Species at risk by type

A list of species at risk for the selected Ontario region.

Mammals

  • eastern-small-footed-bat

    Eastern Small-footed Myotis (Myotis leibii)

    Status: endangered

    The eastern small-footed bat is the smallest bat and one of the rarest bats in eastern North America.

  • little-brown-bat

    Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus)

    Status: endangered

    Little brown bats are one of only two bat species in Ontario that are known to use human structures as summer maternity colony habitat.

  • northern-long-eared-bat

    Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis)

    Status: endangered

    While most Ontario bats catch their dinner in mid-air, northern long-eared bats have also been observed flying down and picking insects off tree leaves, grasses and the ground.

  • tri-colored-bat

    Tr-colored Bat (Perimyotis subflavus)

    Status: endangered

  • mountain-lion-cougar

    Mountain Lion (Cougar) (Puma concolor)

    Status: endangered

    Cougars rarely chase their prey. They are masters of camouflage and will slowly and silently slink forward and then pounce. The Cougar usually hunts at night.

  • american-badger

    American Badger (Northwestern Ontario population) (Taxidea taxus)

    Status: endangered

    When threatened, badgers release a foul smelling musk to drive off enemies.

  • american-badger

    American Badger (Southwestern Ontario population) (Taxidea taxus)

    Status: endangered

    When threatened, badgers release a foul smelling musk to drive off enemies.

  • beluga

    Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas)

    Status: special concern

    The Beluga's enlarged forehead is involved in echo-location, in which clicks are emitted to help locate prey and aid in navigation under ice. The forehead is thought to focus the clicks.

  • woodland-vole

    Woodland Vole (Microtus pinetorum)

    Status: special concern

    Woodland Voles are monogamous, and both males and females participate in caring for the young.

  • eastern-mole

    Eastern Mole (Scalopus aquaticus)

    Status: special concern

    Eastern Moles can dig more than a metre in an hour, and their tunnels can be up to a kilometre long.

  • algonquin-wolf

    Algonquin Wolf (Canis sp.)

    Status: threatened

    Ontario is home to the majority of the global range for the Algonquin Wolf. It is also found in Quebec.

  • wolverine

    Wolverine (Gulo gulo)

    Status: threatened

    Wolverines mark their territory with urine and a musty-smelling scent from glands at the base of the tail, which led to its nickname skunk-bear. This scent marker tells other animals, This area is occupied!

  • woodland-caribou

    Caribou, Boreal population (Rangifer tarandus)

    Status: threatened

    Caribou are excellent swimmers with hollow hair that makes them extremely buoyant.

  • grey-fox

    Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)

    Status: threatened

    Grey Foxes can climb trees! They use their sharp, hooked claws to scramble up tree trunks and can even jump from branch to branch.

  • polar-bear

    Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus)

    Status: threatened

    Female polar bears can travel more than 3,500 kilometres in a year.

Updated: October 16, 2017