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O. Reg. 392/23: ADEQUATE AND EFFECTIVE POLICING (GENERAL)

under Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, S.O. 2019, c. 1, Sched. 1

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current December 18, 2023 (e-Laws currency date)

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Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019

ONTARIO REGULATION 392/23

ADEQUATE AND EFFECTIVE POLICING (GENERAL)

Consolidation Period: From December 18, 2023 to the e-Laws currency date.

Note: THIS REGULATION IS NOT YET IN FORCE. It comes into force (except section 19 and Schedule 1) on April 1, 2024, the day subsection 2 (1) of Schedule 1 (Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019) to the Comprehensive Ontario Police Services Act, 2019 comes into force.

No amendments.

This is the English version of a bilingual regulation.

CONTENTS

Interpretation

1.

Interpretation

Adequate and Effective Policing

2.

Generally applicable standard

Crime Prevention

3.

Standards

4.

Procedures

Law Enforcement

5.

Standards

6.

Procedures

Maintaining the Public Peace

7.

Standards

8.

Procedures

Emergency Response

9.

Standards

10.

Procedures

11.

Other duties of chief of police

12.

Other duties under Extreme Incident Response Plan

Assistance to Victims of Crime

13.

Standards

14.

Procedures

Additional Policing Functions

15.

Dispatching

16.

Compliance with other legal duties

Other Matters re Provision of Policing Functions

17.

Supervision

18.

Capability

19.

Equipment and other resources

20.

Emergency plan

21.

Operational plan for certain incidents

22.

Compliance with written procedures

23.

Quality assurance

24.

Policies to be established

Schedule 1

Required equipment and other resources

 

Interpretation

Interpretation

1. (1) In this Regulation,

“critical infrastructure” means processes, systems, facilities, technologies, networks, assets and services essential to the health, safety, security or economic well-being of Canadians and to the effective functioning of government, including processes, systems, facilities, technologies, networks, assets or services that are interconnected and interdependent with those of another province or territory of Canada or the United States; (“infrastructures essentielles”)

“incident commander” means, as applicable, an incident commander and any class of incident commander, including a major incident commander, critical incident commander and major critical incident commander; (“commandant des opérations sur le lieu de l’incident”)

“extreme incident” means, in relation to a police service, a situation in which there is reason to suspect that,

(a) a terrorism offence within the meaning of section 2 of the Criminal Code (Canada) that will cause or has caused casualties or negative impacts to critical infrastructure in the police service’s area of policing responsibility will be or has been committed,

(b) a criminal offence that will cause or has caused mass casualties will be or has been committed, and the effects of that offence could potentially exceed the capacity of the police service,

(c) a criminal offence that will cause or has caused negative impacts to critical infrastructure, requiring a response by the police service that could potentially exceed its capacity, will be or has been committed,

(d) multiple active attacker incidents, at least one of which is in the police service’s area of policing responsibility, will occur or are occurring, simultaneously, and there is reason to suspect the incidents are related, or

(e) a protest, demonstration or occupation that will pose a serious threat to human life or critical infrastructure will occur or is occurring; (“incident d’une extrême gravité”)

“Extreme Incident Response Plan” means the document titled “Extreme Incident Response Plan” approved by the Minister, dated November 2023 and available on a website of the Government of Ontario; (“Plan d’intervention en cas d’incident d’une extrême gravité”)

“police service’s area of policing responsibility” means, in relation to a police service, the area in which the police service board or Commissioner, as the case may be, has policing responsibility; (“secteur de responsabilité en matière de services policiers du service de police”)

“policing needs of the community” means, in relation to a police service, the policing needs of the people in the police service’s area of policing responsibility, based on such factors as crime, call for service and public disorder analyses, criminal intelligence, road safety information and any other relevant factor; (“besoins de la collectivité en matière de services policiers”)

“Use of Force and Weapons Regulation” means Ontario Regulation 391/23 (Use of Force and Weapons) made under the Act (“Règlement sur l’usage de la force et des armes”).

(2) A requirement in this Regulation that there be capacity to deploy a specified minimum number of people to an incident shall not, for greater certainty, be read as requiring a minimum of that number of people to be deployed to every applicable incident.

(3) A requirement in this Regulation respecting the provision of a policing function may, for greater certainty, be met by entering into an agreement under section 14 of the Act, if permitted by the regulations made for the purposes of that section.

Adequate and Effective Policing

Generally applicable standard

2. (1) A policing function shall be provided to an extent and in a manner that is reasonable, having regard to the following factors:

1. The policing needs of the community.

2. The geographic and socio-demographic characteristics of the police service’s area of policing responsibility.

3. The extent to and manner in which the policing function is effectively provided in similar communities in Ontario.

4. The extent to which past provision of the policing function by the police service has been effective in addressing the policing needs of the community.

5. Best practices respecting the policing function.

(2) Consideration of a factor listed in subsection (1) shall be based on quantitative and qualitative information, to the extent that such information is available in relation to the factor.

(3) In the event of a conflict between this section and any other provision of this Regulation or of another regulation made under subsection 261 (1) of the Act, the other provision prevails to the extent of the conflict.

Crime Prevention

Standards

3. The following standards for adequate and effective policing, relating to crime prevention, are prescribed:

1. Crime prevention shall involve the provision of crime prevention initiatives, including community-based crime prevention initiatives.

2. Crime prevention initiatives shall be consistent with,

i. the strategic plan adopted under section 39 or 61 of the Act that applies with respect to the police service, and

ii. the policing needs of the community.

3. Crime prevention initiatives shall be monitored and regularly evaluated to determine their effectiveness and the ongoing need for them.

Procedures

4. Every chief of police shall establish written procedures on crime prevention initiatives.

Law Enforcement

Standards

5. (1) The following standards for adequate and effective policing, relating primarily to law enforcement, are prescribed:

1. Community patrol shall be provided, using a police service’s own police officers, and shall consist of,

i. general patrol, and

ii. directed patrol in the areas and at the times where it is considered necessary or appropriate.

2. Police services shall have,

i. a criminal intelligence process that meets the requirements of subsection (2),

ii. crime analysis, call for service analysis and public disorder analysis capacities, and

iii. investigative supports, including supports in the areas of crime scene analysis, forensic identification services, canine tracking, technical collision investigation and reconstruction, breath analysis by a breath analysis technician, drug recognition expert evaluation, standardized field sobriety testing, physical surveillance, electronic interception of private communications, video and photographic surveillance and behavioural science services.

(2) The criminal intelligence process referred to in subparagraph 2 i of subsection (1) shall include,

(a) the collection of intelligence information, including,

(i) an intelligence collection plan that at a minimum addresses the resources to be used for the collection of intelligence information where needed, and

(ii) the gathering of information covertly and overtly as needed;

(b) the processing and collation of intelligence information, including,

(i) the storage of intelligence information in record management systems or intelligence databases, as applicable, and

(ii) the management and retrieval of collected intelligence information;

(c) the analysis and evaluation of intelligence information, including,

(i) the assessment of the reliability and validity of information and its source,

(ii) the analysis of information to assess its usefulness, and

(iii) the analysis and collation of information to create intelligence products;

(d) the dissemination of intelligence information, including,

(i) ensuring that appropriate classifications and restrictions, such as notices indicating the level of confidentiality clearance required, are included on intelligence products,

(ii) protocols for the timely approvals and sharing of intelligence information within the police service,

(iii) protocols for the timely approvals and sharing of intelligence information with other police services, law enforcement agencies, intelligence agencies such as Criminal Intelligence Service Ontario, appropriate government agencies and other organizations, as applicable,

(iv) protocols for the timely approvals and sharing of intelligence information through intelligence databases, as applicable,

(v) protocols for the exigent sharing of intelligence information where there is a potential imminent risk to life or critical infrastructure, and

(vi) a process to record and track the dissemination of intelligence information; and

(e) the maintenance of intelligence information in a manner that ensures its security.

Procedures

6. (1) Every chief of police shall establish the following written procedures:

1. Procedures on community patrol that address when and where directed patrol is considered necessary or appropriate, based on the policing needs of the community.

2. Procedures on traffic direction and enforcement, including traffic patrol.

3. Procedures for when more than one police officer must respond to an occurrence or call for service.

4. Procedures in respect of,

i. internal task forces,

ii. joint forces operations,

iii. undercover operations,

iv. criminal intelligence,

v. crime, call for service and public disorder analyses,

vi. informants and agents,

vii. witness protection and security,

viii. police response to persons who are in crisis, regardless of whether those persons appear to have a mental illness or a neurodevelopmental disability,

ix. search of the person,

x. search of premises,

xi. arrest,

xii. bail and violent crime,

xiii. detainee care and control,

xiv. detainee transportation, and

xv. property and evidence control.

5. Procedures in respect of the investigative supports listed in subparagraph 2 iii of subsection 5 (1) and any other investigative supports available to members of the police service.

6. Procedures for the provision of law enforcement in respect of all navigable bodies and courses of water within the police service’s area of policing responsibility.

(2) The criminal intelligence procedures required under subparagraph 4 iv of subsection (1) shall, at a minimum, address the collection, use, disclosure, retention, disposal, correction and dissemination of, and access to, criminal intelligence information, as well as related audit procedures.

Maintaining the Public Peace

Standards

7. (1) In this section and section 8,

“public order incident” means an incident requiring the services of a public order unit.

(2) The following standards for adequate and effective policing, relating primarily to maintaining the public peace, are prescribed:

1. Maintaining the public peace shall include the functions of a public order unit.

2. A public order unit shall have the capacity to deploy to a public order incident, at a minimum, a section of the unit consisting of,

i. at least 32 police officers, including a section leader, and

ii. a public order commander.

3. A public order unit must be able to be deployed in a reasonable time, having regard to,

i. the policing needs of the community,

ii. the geographic and socio-demographic characteristics of the police service’s area of policing responsibility,

iii. the total population and population density of the police service’s area of policing responsibility,

iv. the presence of critical infrastructure in the location where the public order unit is to be deployed,

v. information about public order incidents in the police service’s area of policing responsibility within at least the previous three years, including information about the scope and severity of the incidents, and

vi. best practices in relation to response times for public order units.

Procedures

8. Every chief of police shall establish the following written procedures:

1. Procedures respecting the functions, responsibilities and reporting relationships of a public order unit and its members, including in relation to the role of a public order commander and, if any, to a police liaison team.

2. Procedures respecting the deployment of a public order unit for planned and unplanned public order incidents, including,

i. setting out the circumstances for deployment,

ii. specifying the process for authorizing deployment, and

iii. identifying operational responsibility for authorizing deployment.

3. Procedures for debriefing a public order incident within the police service following the deployment of a public order unit, which shall include,

i. the preparation of a summary of information regarding the incident, including the nature of the incident, the date, time and location of the incident, the environment in which the incident occurred and the details on the response to the incident by the public order unit, and

ii. an analysis of the outcome of the incident, including what worked well and recommendations for improvements, as well as matters to be addressed through changes to procedures or training.

4. Procedures on police action in respect of labour disputes.

5. Procedures on police action in respect of protests, demonstrations and occupations.

Emergency Response

Standards

9. (1) The following standards for adequate and effective policing, relating primarily to emergency response, are prescribed:

1. Response to emergency calls for service shall be provided, 24 hours a day.

2. Emergency response shall include,

i. the functions of a tactical unit, as set out in subsection (3),

ii. the functions of a hostage rescue team, as set out in subsection (4),

iii. the functions of an incident commander,

iv. the functions of a crisis negotiator, and

v. explosive disposal.

3. The members of a police service providing the emergency response functions listed in paragraph 2 must be able to be deployed within a reasonable time, having regard to,

i. the policing needs of the community,

ii. the geographic and socio-demographic characteristics of the police service’s area of policing responsibility,

iii. the total population and population density of the police service’s area of policing responsibility,

iv. information about incidents requiring the provision of an emergency response function listed in paragraph 2 in the police service’s area of policing responsibility within at least the previous three years, including information about the scope and severity of the incidents, and

v. best practices in relation to emergency response times.

4. A tactical unit or hostage rescue team shall have the capacity to deploy at least 12 full-time tactical officers, including a supervisor, to an incident requiring tactical or hostage rescue services. However, the functions of a tactical unit and hostage rescue team may be provided by a single unit or team that is capable of performing the functions of both a tactical unit and a hostage rescue team.

5. Police officers who are not members of a tactical unit and who are deployed in a containment function, including members of a containment team, shall not, before the arrival of members of a tactical unit, employ offensive tactics unless the police officers believe, on reasonable grounds, that to do so is necessary to protect against the loss of life or serious bodily harm.

6. At least one member of a tactical unit deployed to an incident must have successfully completed the training prescribed by the Minister for the purposes of this paragraph.

7. For the purposes of subparagraph 2 iv, there shall be capacity in the police service to deploy at least two crisis negotiators simultaneously to any incident requiring the functions of a crisis negotiator.

8. Emergency response shall include emergency ground and waterways search, rescue and recovery which, in the case of emergency ground searches for missing persons, shall include capacity to deploy members of a police service to conduct searches and a search manager to coordinate searches and manage searchers.

9. Members of a police service providing emergency ground and waterways search, rescue or recovery must be able to be deployed within a reasonable time, having regard to,

i. the policing needs of the community,

ii. the geographic and socio-demographic characteristics of the police service’s area of policing responsibility,

iii. the total population and population density of the police service’s area of policing responsibility,

iv. information about incidents requiring emergency ground and waterways search, rescue or recovery in the police service’s area of policing responsibility within at least the previous three years, including information about the scope and severity of the incidents, and

v. best practices in relation to response times for emergency ground and waterways search, rescue and recovery.

10. In the case of emergency ground searches, the search manager must ensure that the area covered by the emergency ground search is recorded and that the steps taken to complete the search are documented.

11. A member of a police service shall not be assigned responsibilities respecting the recording of information and decisions during an incident without their having successfully completed the training prescribed by the Minister on that subject.

(2) In paragraph 4 of subsection (1), “full-time tactical officer” means a police officer assigned and dedicated to a tactical unit or hostage rescue team but who, when not training or undertaking tactical or hostage rescue activities, may undertake community patrol.

(3) The functions of a tactical unit are,

(a) containment; and

(b) apprehension of an armed barricaded person.

(4) The functions of a hostage rescue team are,

(a) the functions listed in subsection (3);

(b) explosive forced entry; and

(c) hostage rescue.

Procedures

10. (1) Every chief of police shall establish the following written procedures:

1. Procedures respecting the provision of the functions listed in paragraph 2 of subsection 9 (1),

i. setting out the circumstances in which the members of a police service providing the functions will be deployed,

ii. in relation to the functions of tactical units and hostage rescue teams, authorizing the tactical supervisor or incident commanders to determine how many tactical officers are required to be deployed to an incident, and

iii. in relation to the deployment of incident commanders and crisis negotiators,

A. specifying the process for authorizing deployment,

B. identifying operational responsibility for authorizing deployment, and

C. in the case of incident commanders, ensuring that an incident commander assigned to manage an incident has the training prescribed by the Minister that is appropriate to the incident.

2. If the police service has a containment team, procedures for that team, including setting out the circumstances in which the team will be deployed.

3. Procedures on preliminary perimeter control and containment,

i. setting out the circumstances in which preliminary perimeter control and containment will be established,

ii. identifying who has operational responsibility for the establishment of preliminary perimeter control and containment, and

iii. setting out the duties of police officers in respect of establishing preliminary perimeter control and containment until the arrival of a tactical unit or containment team.

4. Procedures relating to extreme incidents that are consistent with the Extreme Incident Response Plan.

5. If the police service has a mobile mental health and addictions crisis team, procedures respecting its functions and the provision of those functions.

6. Procedures on explosive forced entry and explosive disposal,

i. respecting the initial response to occurrences involving found or suspected explosives,

ii. respecting the deployment of police forced entry explosives and explosive disposal services, including,

A. setting out the circumstances for deployment,

B. specifying the process for authorizing deployment, and

C. identifying operational responsibility for authorizing deployment. 

7. Procedures on responses to a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive incident.

8. Procedures on emergency ground search, rescue and recovery,

i. respecting the coordination of searches and management of searchers by a search manager, including the deployment of members of the police service as searchers, and

ii. setting out requirements for the tracking and documentation of emergency ground searches by a search manager for the purposes of paragraph 10 of subsection 9 (1).

9. Procedures on emergency waterways search, rescue and recovery, including underwater search and recovery,

i. respecting the functions, responsibilities and reporting relationships of members of a police service who are responsible for or undertake waterways search, rescue and recovery and of persons who are assisting those members while acting under their direction, and

ii. respecting the deployment of members of the police service for waterways search, rescue and recovery, including,

A. setting out the circumstances for deployment,

B. specifying the process for authorizing deployment, and

C. identifying operational responsibility for authorizing deployment. 

10. Procedures respecting canine units,

i. respecting the functions, responsibilities and reporting relationships of canine units and canine teams, and

ii. respecting the deployment of canine units and canine teams, including,

A. setting out the circumstances for deployment,

B. specifying the process for authorizing deployment, and

C. identifying operational responsibility for authorizing deployment.

(2) For the purposes of paragraph 10 of subsection (1),

“canine team” means a team comprised of a dog and a member of a police service who is a dog handler; (“équipe canine”)

“canine unit” means a unit of two or more canine teams. (“unité canine”)

Other duties of chief of police

11. (1) Every chief of police shall ensure that the following individuals are police officers:

1. A member of a tactical unit or hostage rescue team.

2. A member of a containment team, if any.

3. An incident commander.

4. A crisis negotiator.

(2) Every chief of police shall,

(a) comply with any obligations of chiefs of police set out in the Extreme Incident Response Plan; and

(b) ensure that members of the police service respond to extreme incidents in a manner consistent with the Extreme Incident Response Plan.

(3) Every chief of police shall take reasonable steps to develop partnerships with other emergency service providers and, if any, trained volunteer groups, for the purpose of facilitating coordination of operations in the police service’s area of policing responsibility in relation to the matters listed in paragraphs 7, 8 and 9 of subsection 10 (1).

Other duties under Extreme Incident Response Plan

12. (1) Every police service board shall comply with any obligations of police service boards set out in the Extreme Incident Response Plan.

(2) The Minister shall comply with any obligations of the Minister set out in the Extreme Incident Response Plan.

Assistance to Victims of Crime

Standards

13. The following standards for adequate and effective policing respecting assistance to victims of crime are prescribed:

1. Victims of crime shall be offered assistance as soon as possible.

2. Victims of crime shall be provided with referrals to, as appropriate in the circumstances, emergency services, health care professionals, victim support agencies, social service agencies and other appropriate governmental, non-governmental or community organizations.

Procedures

14. Every chief of police shall establish written procedures on providing assistance to victims that,

(a) reflect the principles of the Victims’ Bill of Rights, 1995 and the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights; and

(b) set out the responsibilities of members of the police service in providing assistance to victims.

Additional Policing Functions

Dispatching

15. (1) For the purposes of paragraph 6 of subsection 11 (1) of the Act, adequate and effective policing includes dispatching members of a police service.

(2) The following standards for adequate and effective policing, relating to the dispatching of members of a police service, are prescribed:

1. A communications centre that operates 24 hours a day with one or more communications operators or dispatchers to answer emergency calls for service and that maintains constant two-way voice communication capability with police officers who are on patrol or responding to emergency calls must be used for the purposes of dispatching members of a police service.

2. A member of a police service must be available 24 hours a day to supervise police communications and dispatch services.

3. Police officers on patrol must be provided with portable two-way voice communication capability that allows the police officers to be in contact with the communications centre when away from their vehicle or on foot patrol.

4. A member of a police service who supervises communications operators and dispatchers must have successfully completed the training prescribed by the Minister on that subject.

(3) Every chief of police shall establish written procedures on communications and dispatch services.

Compliance with other legal duties

16. For the purposes of paragraph 6 of subsection 11 (1) of the Act, adequate and effective policing includes compliance with any duty imposed on a chief of police, police officer, police service or member of a police service, as applicable, under the Children’s Law Reform Act, the Courts of Justice Act, the Police Record Checks Reform Act, 2015 or any other Ontario statute.

Other Matters re Provision of Policing Functions

Supervision

17. (1) Supervision shall be available to members of a police service 24 hours a day in the provision of any policing function.

(2) Every chief of police shall establish written procedures on supervision, including setting out circumstances in which a supervisor must be contacted and when a supervisor must be present at an incident.

Capability

18. Every chief of police shall ensure that the members of the police service, or persons performing a policing function under the direction of a member, are capable of performing the functions assigned to them.

Note: Section 19 comes into force on April 1, 2025, the first anniversary of the day subsection 1 (1) comes into force.

Equipment and other resources

19. (1) Every chief of police shall ensure that the equipment and other resources provided to members of the police service for the purpose of providing a policing function shall include at least the equipment and resources set out in Schedule 1 to this Regulation.

(2) A duty under subsection (1) to provide a weapon to a member of the police service is subject to any applicable requirements under the Use of Force and Weapons Regulation respecting the provision of the weapon to the member.

Emergency plan

20. (1) Every chief of police shall, subject to subsection (2), prepare an emergency plan for the police service setting out the roles and responsibilities of the police service during an emergency and the procedures to be followed during an emergency.

(2) In developing a plan under subsection (1), the chief of police of a police service that is maintained by a police service board shall consult with the municipality or First Nation that maintains the board and any other applicable emergency service providers.

(3) A chief of police to whom subsection (2) applies may adopt as the police service’s emergency plan the emergency plan of the municipality or First Nation, if that emergency plan addresses the roles and responsibilities of the police service during an emergency and the procedures to be followed by members of the police service during an emergency.

Operational plan for certain incidents

21. (1) This section applies if,

(a) an incident requires multiple members of a chief of police’s police service to provide emergency response or maintain the public peace policing functions outside of the police service’s area of policing responsibility; and

(b) the provision of policing functions by the police service in relation to the incident is anticipated to continuously last, or has already continuously lasted, longer than the duration of a normal shift for the involved members of the police service.

(2) The chief of police shall develop an operational plan for the deployment of members of the chief’s police service in relation to the incident described in subsection (1), having regard to any applicable collective agreements.

(3) The operational plan shall address, without limitation, breaks and meals for members of the police service who are deployed in relation to the incident.

(4) The chief of police shall comply with the requirements in the operational plan.

Compliance with written procedures

22. Every chief of police shall ensure that the police service provides policing functions in accordance with the written procedures the chief of police establishes under the Act.

Quality assurance

23. Every police service board and every chief of police shall implement a quality assurance process relating to,

(a) the provision of adequate and effective policing; and

(b) compliance with the Act and the regulations.

Policies to be established

24. (1) The following matters are prescribed for the purposes of clauses 38 (1) (g) and 60 (1) (f) of the Act:

1. The publication of crime analysis, call analysis and public disorder analysis data, and of information on crime trends.

2. Every matter with respect to which a chief of police is required under this Regulation to establish procedures.

(2) Policies established for the purposes of paragraph 1 of subsection (1) shall require that the data and information be published annually on the internet.

25. Omitted (provides for coming into force of provisions of this Regulation).

Note: Schedule 1 comes into force on April 1, 2025, the first anniversary of the day subsection 1 (1) comes into force.

Schedule 1
Required Equipment and Other Resources

Definitions

1. In this Schedule,

“CS” means 2-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile; (“CS”)

“OC” means oleoresin capsicum. (“OC”)

Public order units

2. (1) Every member of a public order unit shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. Body armour that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type II body armour as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor NIJ Standard-0101.06, as amended from time to time, is of subdued colour or matte finishing, and has the word “Police” or “POLICE” prominently and clearly legible on the front and rear.

2. A helmet that, at a minimum, meets the standards established in the National Institute of Justice’s NIJ Standard for Riot Helmets and Face Shields NIJ Standard-0104.02, as amended from time to time.

3. A shield that is designed for riot or crowd control and is easily manipulated with one hand, is constructed of clear material and has the word “POLICE” prominently and clearly legible on the shield.

4. A non-collapsible baton that is between 24 and 26 inches in length.

5. A respiratory mask that,

i. provides CS chemical agent protection,

ii. contains a filtration canister,

iii. is designed not to impair peripheral vision,

iv. contains a filter system that will not interfere with the ambidextrous shoulder-firing of a weapon, and

v. provides hydration capabilities.

6. Reinforced heavy-duty boots that have steel shank or carbon fibre protection and toe impact protection and a chemical and puncture resistant sole.

7. Gloves that are fire-resistant and provide impact protection.

8. An outer layer of clothing that is fire-resistant and provides body impact protection and deflection.

9. An inner layer of clothing that is flame-resistant.

10. An individual first-aid kit that contains, at a minimum, disinfectant, one pressure bandage, one tourniquet, one hemostatic gauze dressing, one pair of gloves, one pair of shears and one chest seal.

11. Protective eyewear that has ballistic capabilities that offer effective eye protection against fragmentation, is designed not to impair peripheral vision and includes clear, anti-fogging lenses.

12. A flashlight that has an illumination of a minimum of 60 lumens as measured in an integrated sphere and is durable and water-resistant.

13. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

14. A conducted energy weapon prescribed by the Use of Force and Weapons Regulation.

(2) Every public order unit shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. Portable fire suppression equipment.

2. A portable water eyewash station for OC and CS decontamination.

3. A portable loud hailing system.

4. A firearm that is a 37 or 40 mm launcher suitable for chemical munitions or impact munitions.

5. A canister system containing OC that is designed to be launched or hand delivered.

6. A canister system containing CS that is designed to be launched or hand delivered.

7. A remotely-piloted aircraft system.

Containment teams

3. (1) Every member of a containment team shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. Body armour that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type III body armour as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor NIJ Standard-0101.06, as amended from time to time, is of subdued colour or matte finishing and has the word “Police” or “POLICE” prominently and clearly legible on the front and rear.

2. A helmet that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type II ballistic helmets as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s NIJ Standard for Ballistic Helmets 0106.01, as amended from time to time, and is of a subdued colour or matte finishing.

3. A semi-automatic rifle that is equipped with a minimum of two magazines that each have a minimum capacity of 30 rounds.

4. A conducted energy weapon prescribed by the Use of Force and Weapons Regulation.

5. A firearm-mounted light for every firearm.

6. A pair of binoculars with a minimum specification of 10 x 50.

7. Protective eyewear that has ballistic capabilities that offer effective eye protection against fragmentation, is designed not to impair peripheral vision and includes clear, anti-fogging lenses.

8. Gloves that are flame-resistant.

9. Boots that are water-resistant and provide cold weather protection.

10. Outer and inner layers of clothing that are flame-resistant.

11. An individual first-aid kit that contains, at a minimum, disinfectant, one pressure bandage, one tourniquet, one hemostatic gauze dressing, one pair of gloves, one pair of shears and one chest seal.

12. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

(2) Every containment team shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A firearm that is a 37 or 40 mm launcher suitable for impact munitions.

2. A portable loud hailing system.

3. A tire deflation device.

4. A mobile device with internet and intranet access.

5. At least two night vision optical devices.

Tactical units and hostage rescue teams

4. (1) Every member of a tactical unit or hostage rescue team shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. Body armour that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type III body armour as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor NIJ Standard-0101.06, as amended from time to time, is of subdued colour or matte finishing and has the word “Police” or “POLICE” prominently and clearly legible on the front and rear.

2. A helmet that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type II ballistic helmets as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s NIJ Standard for Ballistic Helmets 0106.01, as amended from time to time, and is of a subdued colour or matte finishing.

3. A semi-automatic rifle that is equipped with a minimum of two magazines that each have a minimum capacity of 30 rounds.

4. A conducted energy weapon prescribed by the Use of Force and Weapons Regulation.

5. A pair of binoculars with a minimum specification of 10 x 50.

6. A night vision optical device.

7. A firearm-mounted light for every firearm.

8. A weapon sighting system that allows for day or night usage.

9. Protective eyewear that has ballistic capabilities that offer effective eye protection against fragmentation, is designed not to impair peripheral vision and includes clear, anti-fogging lenses.

10. Gloves that are flame-resistant.

11. Boots that are water-resistant and provide cold weather protection.

12. Outer and inner layers of clothing that are flame-resistant.

13. An individual first-aid kit that contains, at a minimum, disinfectant, one pressure bandage, one tourniquet, one hemostatic gauze dressing, one pair of gloves, one pair of shears and one chest seal.

14. A respiratory mask that,

i. provides CS chemical agent protection,

ii. contains a filtration canister,

iii. is designed not to impair peripheral vision,

iv. contains a filter system that will not interfere with the ambidextrous shoulder-firing of a weapon, and

v. provides hydration capabilities.

15. Hearing protection that does not inhibit radio and voice communications and is designed to be worn in conjunction with a ballistic helmet.

16. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

(2) Every tactical unit or hostage rescue team shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. At least two ballistic shields that, at a minimum, meet the standards for Type III-A armour as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s Ballistic Resistant Protective Materials NIJ Standard 0108.01, as amended from time to time. 

2. At least two blast shields designed specifically for explosive entry.

3. At least two marksman rifles that are equipped with a magnifying optical sight with night vision capability.

4. A firearm that is a 37 or 40 mm launcher suitable for chemical munitions or impact munitions.

5. A canister system containing OC that is designed to be launched or hand delivered.

6. A canister system containing CS that is designed to be launched or hand delivered.

7. A tire deflation device.

8. Fire suppression equipment.

9. The following breaching tools:

i. Entry rams.

ii. Pry bars.

iii. Break-rake tools.

iv. Sledgehammers.

v. A Halligan tool.

vi. Heavy-duty bolt cutters.

10. A portable loud hailing system.

11. Ropes of various gauges, lengths and strengths, having regard to reasonably-expected training and operational use.

12. Noise flash distraction devices and smoke canisters.

13. A minimum of one extendable ladder that is of a matte finish, capable of multi-officer use and has a minimum height of six feet.

14. A mobile device with internet and intranet access.

15. A satellite phone.

16. A remotely-piloted aircraft system.

Crisis negotiators

5. (1) Every crisis negotiator shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A computer or tablet with templates, forms, checklists, access to records management systems and applications to monitor social media.

2. A portable field phone equipped with one-way monitoring capability.

3. A telephone system for dedicated connection to the field phone, complete with a logging monitor capable of recording, and ample recording storage capability.

4. A portable recording device.

5. Cell phone with data, voice and text capabilities.

6. A portable loud hailing system.

(2) If a crisis negotiator is deployed with a unit or team whose members have a higher level of ballistic protection, the crisis negotiator shall be provided with the same level of ballistic protection as the members of that unit or team.

Incident commanders

6. Every incident commander shall be provided the following equipment and other resources:

1. A computer or tablet with templates, forms, checklists, access to records management systems and applications to monitor social media.

2. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

3. A mobile device with internet and intranet access.

4. A dedicated communication device for the command post or command centre.

5. A satellite phone.

6. A mobile command post or a command centre, as necessary, that,

i. is capable of housing of a minimum of eight persons,

ii. can be expanded as required to support the police operations, and

iii. has a separate and secure area for a negotiation team.

Canine units

7. (1) Every member of a canine unit shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. Body armour that, at a minimum, meet the standards for Type II body armour as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor NIJ Standard-0101.06, as amended from time to time, is of a subdued colour or matte finishing and has the word “Police” or “POLICE” prominently and clearly legible on the front and rear.

2. A pair of binoculars with a minimum specification of 10 x 50.

3. A night vision optical device.

4. A firearm-mounted light for every firearm.

5. A weapon sighting system that allows for day or night usage.

6. A flashlight with an illumination of a minimum of 60 lumens as measured in an integrated sphere and that is durable and water-resistant.

7. Protective eyewear that has ballistic capabilities that offer effective eye protection against fragmentation, is designed not to impair peripheral vision and includes clear, anti-fogging lenses.

8. A multi-purpose tool.

9. An individual first-aid kit that contains, at a minimum, disinfectant, one pressure bandage, one tourniquet, one hemostatic gauze dressing, one pair of gloves, one pair of shears, one chest seal, veterinary wrap and reasonable first-aid supplies for the canine.

10. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

(2) If a member of a canine unit is deployed with a unit or team whose members have a higher level of ballistic protection, the member of the canine unit shall be provided with the same level of ballistic protection as members of that other unit or team.

(3) Every canine unit shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A mobile device with internet and intranet access.

2. A dedicated vehicle that has air conditioning and a heating system, a vehicle interior temperature detection and warning system and, if carrying explosive detection training aids, a monitored intrusion alarm.

3. A police canine home kennel for each canine.

Explosive disposal units

8. (1) Every member of an explosive disposal unit shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

2. Protective eyewear that has ballistic capabilities that offer effective eye protection against fragmentation, is designed not to impair peripheral vision and includes clear, anti-fogging lenses.

3. A multi-purpose tool.

4. Gloves that provide flash protection.

5. Boots that are water-resistant and provide cold weather protection.

6. Outer and inner layers of clothing that provide flash protection.

7. An individual first-aid kit that contains, at a minimum, disinfectant, one pressure bandage, one tourniquet, one hemostatic gauze dressing, one pair of gloves, one pair of shears and one chest seal.

8. A flashlight with an illumination of a minimum of 60 lumens as measured in an integrated sphere and is durable and water-resistant.

(2) Every member of an explosives disposal unit who performs explosive forced entry shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. Body armour that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type III body armour as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor NIJ Standard-0101.06, as amended from time to time, is of subdued colour or matte finishing and has the word “Police” or “POLICE” prominently and clearly legible on the front and rear.

2. A helmet that, at a minimum, meets the standards for Type II ballistic helmets as classified by the National Institute of Justice’s NIJ Standard for Ballistic Helmets 0106.01, as amended from time to time, and is of a subdued colour or matte finishing.

3. A blast shield designed for explosive entry.

(3) Every explosive disposal unit shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A robot that must have remote means of performing reconnaissance and delivery of tools.

2. At least one bomb suit that meets the standards in the National Institute of Justice’s Public Safety Bomb Suit NIJ Standard 0117.01, as amended from time to time.

3. Tools for disruption, such as a barrelled disruption system and water impulse disruptors.

4. A hook and line kit.

5. A Category A Kit to diagnose and render safe an explosive.

6. At least one portable x-ray machine.

7. Range tools, including blast lines, galvanometers and blasting machines and detonator cans.

8. Hand tools to support the maintenance and operational needs of the explosive disposal unit.

9. A portable lighting system that has an illumination of a minimum of 1000 lumens as measured in an integrated sphere and is durable and water-resistant.

10. Access to a containment vessel.

11. A bomb truck that is able to,

i. transport all explosive disposal unit equipment required for calls for service, along with the unit members, and

ii. accommodate rapid access magazines to store detonators and explosives in accordance with the National Standard of Canada Standard CAN/BNQ 2910–510/2015 entitled Explosives — Quantity Distances, as amended from time to time.

12. A mobile device with internet and intranet access.

13. A remotely piloted aircraft system.

14. A satellite phone.

15. Fire suppression equipment.

Emergency ground or waterway search

9. (1) Every member of a police service acting as an emergency ground or waterway searcher shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A GPS device capable of tracking searchers.

2. A compass and a topographical map of the area policed by the police service.

3. A flashlight with an illumination of a minimum of 60 lumens as measured in an integrated sphere and is durable and water-resistant.

4. A head lamp.

5. A backpack for search team equipment.

6. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

7. Protective eyewear that has ballistic capabilities that offer effective eye protection against fragmentation, is designed not to impair peripheral vision and includes clear, anti-fogging lenses.

8. Footwear, gloves, outerwear suitable for the environment and headgear.

9. A highly-visible search and rescue vest.

(2) Every search manager managing an emergency ground or waterway search shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources:

1. A computer or tablet with search and rescue mapping software able to track the search progress.

2. A satellite phone.

3. A mobile command post or a command centre, as necessary.

4. A mobile device with internet and intranet access.

(3) Every emergency ground or waterway search team shall be provided with at least one night vision optical device.

Underwater search and recovery units

10. (1) Every member of a unit responsible for underwater search and recovery shall be provided the following equipment and other resources:

1. A portable radio with capability for encrypted, dedicated and multi-channel communications, along with earpieces.

2. A satellite phone.

3. A two-way wireless and hardwired surface-to-diver and diver-to-diver voice communications system.

4. A diver recall device.

5. A waterproof personal white strobe light.

6. A waterproof personal illumination device.

7. An individual first-aid kit that contains, at a minimum, disinfectant, one pressure bandage, one tourniquet, one hemostatic gauze dressing, one pair of gloves, one pair of shears and one chest seal.

8. Decompression tables.

9. A bio-hazard kit.

10. A HAZMAT information kit.

11. Heavy duty bolt cutters.

12. Personal flotation devices.

13. Police tape for cordoning off an area.

14. Dive flags.

15. A personal equipment bag.

16. Line-tending gloves suitable for underwater search and recovery.

17. Lines.

18. Carabiners.

19. Outerwear suitable for the environment.

20. A field maintenance tool kit.

21. An underwater forensics kit.

22. A climate-controlled shelter.

23. Binoculars with a minimum specification of 10 x 50.

24. Firearm storage and a firearm-locking device.

(2) Each member of a unit responsible for underwater search and recovery shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources for the purpose of performing a diving operation using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA), in addition to the equipment and other resources listed under subsection (1):

1. A full face mask with communications capability.

2. A vulcanized rubber variable-volume dry suit with an integrated dry hood, dry suit gloves and thermal undergarments for use with the dry suit.

3. A buoyancy compensator.

4. Fins.

5. A weight system.

6. A diving harness.

7. A safety line.

8. A knife and a secondary cutting tool.

9. A timing device.

10. A depth gauge.

11. A submersible pressure gauge.

12. An 80 cubic foot main air supply cylinder with a regulator.

13. A bail out air supply, with a regulator and a gas switching block.

(3) Each member of a unit responsible for underwater search and recovery shall be provided with the following equipment and other resources for the purpose of performing a surface air supply diving operation, in addition to the equipment and other resources listed under subsection (1):

1. A full face mask or helmet with communications capability.

2. A vulcanized rubber variable-volume dry suit with an integrated dry hood or mating locking collar, dry suit gloves and thermal undergarments for use with the dry suit.

3. A weight system.

4. A diving harness.

5. A safety line.

6. A timing device.

7. A pneumofathometer hose and gauge.

8. A bail out air supply with a gas switching block.

9. A two-diver air delivery panel, together with adequate primary and redundant secondary air supply to the panel.

 

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