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Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Act
Loi sur la qualification professionnelle et l’apprentissage des gens de métier

R.R.O. 1990, REGULATION 1065

No Amendments

IRONWORKER

Historical version for the period December 31, 1990 to July 4, 2007.

This Regulation is made in English only.

1. In this Regulation,

“certified trade” means the trade of ironworker;

“ironworker” means a person who,

(a) in the field, fabricates, assembles, installs, hoists, erects, dismantles, reconditions, adjusts, alters, repairs or services all structural ironwork, precast and prestressed concrete, concrete reinforcing materials, ferrous and non-ferrous materials in curtain wall, ornamental and miscellaneous metal work and all other materials used in lieu thereof and applies sealants where applicable thereto, and moves and places machinery and heavy equipment, and

(b) reads and understands all shop and field drawings, including those taken from original architectural and engineering drawings, that are related to the work operations contained in clause (a),

but does not include a person employed as a shop-man on the fabrication and assembly of materials in an industrial manufacturing plant. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 1.

2. The trade of ironworker is designated as a certified trade for purposes of the Act. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 2.

3. (1) An apprentice training program is established for the certified trade and shall consist of three periods of related training and work experience training of 2,000 hours for each period,

(a) at full-time educational day classes provided at a college of applied arts and technology in the subjects contained in Schedule 1; and

(b) in work experience training provided by the employer of the apprentice in the subjects contained in Schedule 2. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 3 (1).

(2) The total hours of related training and work experience training shall be assigned as shown in Schedules 1 and 2. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 3 (2).

4. The subjects of examination for an apprentice in the certified trade are the subjects contained in Schedules 1 and 2. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 4.

5. Every apprentice in the certified trade must be at least seventeen years of age. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 5.

6. Every apprentice in the certified trade shall be in good physical health and shall provide medical proof thereof. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 6.

7. No apprentice shall be permitted to engage in the certified trade unless he is capable of climbing to and manoeuvring at heights commonly experienced in the certified trade. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 7.

8. (1) Despite subsection 8 (2) of Regulation 1055 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990, every hour worked by an apprentice in excess of regular daily hours of practical work experience training shall be included in computing the hours spent in related training and work experience training. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 8 (1).

(2) The Director shall issue a progress record book to an apprentice in the certified trade for the purpose of recording the time spent by the apprentice in respect of related training and work experience training and the apprentice is responsible for its safekeeping. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 8 (2).

9. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the certified trade, whether for regular daily hours or hours in excess of regular daily hours, shall be not less than,

(a) 60 per cent during the first 1,000 hours of related training and work experience training;

(b) 70 per cent during the second 1,000 hours of related training and work experience training;

(c) 75 per cent during the third 1,000 hours of related training and work experience training;

(d) 80 per cent during the fourth 1,000 hours of related training and work experience training;

(e) 85 per cent during the fifth 1,000 hours of related training and work experience training;

(f) 90 per cent during the sixth 1,000 hours of related training and work experience training,

of the average hourly rate of wages or its equivalent for a journeyman employed by the employer in the certified trade and with whom the apprentice is working. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 9.

10. The number of apprentices who may be employed by an employer in the certified trade shall not exceed,

(a) one apprentice for the first journeyman employed by the employer plus one additional apprentice for each additional seven journeymen employed by the employer in the certified trade; and

(b) one apprentice for the first journeyman employed by the employer plus one additional apprentice for each additional five journeymen employed by the employer in the trade where the employer is engaged solely in the occupational skills described in item 3 or item 4 of Schedule 2. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 10.

11. A contract of apprenticeship shall be entered into by every apprentice with the local apprenticeship committee for the certified trade, established under the Act in the area in which his or her apprenticeship originates and the apprentice is responsible for preparing the reports of work experience and instruction as prescribed in his or her progress report book for submission to such local apprenticeship committee. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 11.

12. The local apprenticeship committee is responsible for periodic review of the progress of each apprentice and for ensuring that the apprentice obtains the prescribed range of work experience and related training as prescribed in the appendix of the progress record book. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 12.

13. (1) Section 9 and subsection 10 (2) of the Act do not apply to any person who works or is employed in the certified trade. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 13 (1).

(2) Subsection 10 (3) of the Act does not apply to an employer in the certified trade. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 13 (2).

14. A certificate of qualification in the certified trade is not required to be renewed. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, s. 14.

SCHEDULE 1
IRONWORKER

In-School Training

Item

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

 

Course

Subject

Instruction to be Given

     

Total Hours 636

1

Mathematics

(Trade Related)

 

Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, decimal fractions. Conversion of common fractions to decimals. Averages and percentages, linear measurement, simple equations. Ratio and proportion. Angle measurement. Areas of squares, rectangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, triangles. Volumes of cubes and cylindrical objects. Measurement of regular and irregular shaped forms.

2

Blueprint Reading

Architectural Structural, Shop Drawings

Types, methods of making, care and handling of prints. Lines and sections. Material symbols. Construction drawing elements, principles, symbols and dimensions. Auxiliary views. Notes and specifications. Steel frame construction members, framing for ore bridges, power houses, highway bridges, factory and office buildings and conveyors. Design and detail drawings. Column, purlin, strut, brace and beam symbols. Concrete reinforcing drawings for reinforcing bars and concrete reinforced steel accessories. Engineering and placing drawings. Wire mesh drawings. Reinforced concrete design drawings. Welding drawings and symbols, curtain wall, sash and other non-ferrous building trim drawings. Precast concrete drawings. Ornamental drawings for doors, frames, stairs, gratings and grilles.

3

Structural Ironwork

Layout and Fabrication

Methods and procedures for drilling, reaming, burning, cutting, assembling and marking steel members.

   

Erection and Assembly of Structural Steel Shapes

Methods and procedures for performing the functions of hooking-on, tagging, signalling, connecting, fitting, bolting, rivetting, guying, plumbing, aligning and shimming.

   

Connecting

Knowledge of bolting, rivetting, pinning, and welding techniques.

   

Hoisting and Installing

Knowledge of the care and use of mobile land rigs, cranes, guy derricks, stiff-leg derricks, gin poles, high lines and tuggers. Erecting falsework and scaffolding and a knowledge of the breaking strains and working strengths of cables.

   

Care and Use of Tools

Knowledge of chokers, spreaders, chain blocks, rope falls, shackles, rivetting guns, bolting machines, air compressors, burning equipment, welding equipment and jacks. Power activated tools and insert setting tools.

   

Precast Concrete and Laminated Timbers

Methods of handling precast and prestressed members. Hoisting and placing precast columns, beams, roof and floor slabs, architectural precast units, fascia panels and wall panels.

   

Safety Regulations

Safety regulations and procedures for the performance of structural ironwork.

4

Rigging

Care and Use of Tools

Splicing tools.

   

Tying Knots and Making Hitches

Tying knots and making bowline hitches, clovehitch, timber hitch, scaffold hitch, barrel hitch, becket hitch, half hitch and rolling hitch.

   

Splicing

Splicing fibre and wire rope by short splicing, long splicing, crown and back splicing methods.

   

Handling Ropes

Handling fibre and wire rope, including coiling and uncoiling, cutting, fitting clips and clamps, reeving drums and sheaves.

   

Care and Use of Slings

Proper use and positioning of chokers, spreaders, hooks, guy lines and anchorage. Knowledge of the breaking strains and working strengths of hoisting cables.

   

Care and Use of Hoisting Equipment

Knowledge of hoisting equipment including block and tackle, reeving or lacing equipment, chain blocks and come-alongs, skids, rollers, jacks, blocking equipment, cribbing gin poles, stiff-leg derricks, mobile cranes, bull-mooses, and tower cranes.

   

Care and Use of Scaffolding

Knowledge of scaffolding and tower hoists equipment including planking, swinging scaffolds, suspended scaffolds, needle beams, boatswain chairs and safeway scaffolding.

   

Safety

Safety requirements and procedures for the performance of rigging operations.

5

Reinforcing Ironwork

Knowledge of Materials

Knowledge of the specifications for bar size designations and size marks, bar tags and colours, wire mesh, stirrups, slab spacers, slab and beam bolsters, chairs and lapping.

   

Placing Steel

Knowledge of the methods of placing steel in floor slabs, beams, columns, walls, piers, footings and stairways.

   

Tying

Knowledge of the method of making snap ties, wrap and snap ties, column ties, wrap and figure eight ties and nail head ties.

   

Cutting and Bending

Knowledge of the method of cutting, bending, and fabricating steel bars for columns, beams, floor slabs, and stirrup and a detailed knowledge of bend allowances.

   

Tools and Associate Equipment

Knowledge of the care and use of pliers, safety belts and reels, twisters, hickey bars, bolt cutters, bending tables and jigs, power shears and burning equipment.

   

Laying of Pans

Methods of installation.

   

Post Tensioning of Concrete

Methods of post tensioning.

   

Layout Procedures

Knowledge of blueprint reading and bar lists for placing of bars.

   

Welding

Knowledge of welding techniques.

   

Safety Requirements

Knowledge of the safety regulations and procedures for the performance of reinforcing operations.

6

Ornamental Ironwork and Curtain Wall Installations

Layout

Knowledge of the layout methods for doors, frames, gratings and grilles, hand-rails, stairways, platforms, railings, and miscellaneous ironwork.

   

Erecting and Fitting

Knowledge of welding, drilling, burning, bending, fabricating, plumbing and alignment.

   

Curtain Wall, Window Wall and Sash

Knowledge of the care and handling and fabrication of aluminum, brass, bronze, stainless steel and other ferrous and non-ferrous building trim. Methods for the installation of automatic door mechanisms.

   

Installation of Metal Products

Knowledge of the methods for installing extruded aluminum frames, side jambs, head jambs, sash division and corner bars. Familiarization with plans and specifications establishing lines and levels, setting anchors, assembling and installing curtain wall components, levelling, aligning, securing, and installing adapters, flashing and sealants.

   

Care and Use of Tools

Knowledge of ordinary hand tools.

   

Sealing

Knowledge of the care and use of resin base, silicon base, polysulphide base, mastic base and polybutane base sealants.

   

Safety Procedures

Knowledge of the safety regulations and procedures for the performance of ornamental iron and curtain wall work.

7

Welding and Burning Equipment

Electric Arc Welding

Knowledge of the care and use of electrodes, AC & DC welding machines, cables and allied equipment. Fundamentals of manual welding of carbon and alloy steels, including proper fit-up, distortion control and cause and control of weld defects. Purpose and techniques for preheating, post heating and stress relieving.

   

Cutting and Burning

Knowledge and use of oxyacetylene equipment, both hand and machine, for flame cutting steel, and piercing. Knowledge and use of carbon-arc equipment for removing steel, making weld grooves and cutting steel.

   

Safety

Knowledge of first aid treatment for arc burns to eyes and body, and electric shock. Importance of protective equipment and clothing. Hazards of working on or in vessels or tanks or confined areas.

R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, Sched. 1.

SCHEDULE 2
IRONWORKER

In-School Training

Item

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

 

Course

Subject

Work Experience Training

     

Total Hours 2,652

1

Structural Ironworker and Rigging

Layout and Lines

Transferring lines and grades to structure. Laying out structural steel.

   

Selection and Use of Hand Tools (Non-Cutting Tools)

Wrenches, hammers, pins, clamps, leverage tools, air hose clamps, punches.

   

(Cutting Tools)

Cold chisels, handsaws, files, snips, axes, adze, wood boring, wood chisels, flame cutting, carbon arc cutting.

   

(Portable Air Tools)

Impact wrenches, drills and reamers, hammers, grinders and brushes, timber saws, rivet passers.

   

(Portable Electric Tools)

Drills, grinders, impact wrenches, ventilating equipment, lumber saws.

   

(Miscellaneous)

High mechanical advantage machines, forges, heating torches.

   

Rope and Tackle

Selecting rope, installing rope, selecting sheave blocks, installing sheave blocks, installing high line.

   

Scaffolds and Falsework

Selecting a hanging scaffold. Hanging a scaffold. Maintaining hanging scaffolds. Selecting a rigid scaffold or walkway, installing and maintaining rigid scaffold or walkway.

   

Ladders and Stairways

Selection, erecting, maintaining.

   

Barricades and Security

The Occupational Health and Safety Act. Maintaining security. Personal safety equipment.

   

Falsework

Erection. Releasing.

   

Timberwork

Slinging and handling timber structures.

   

Erection Equipment (Cranes)

Types of and usage. Loading, moving and receiving. Setting up. Lifting with cranes. Maintenance.

   

(Derricks)

Types of and usage. Loading. Erecting. Lifting and maintenance.

   

(Hoists and Winches)

Types and usage. Installation. Operation.

   

(Jacks)

Types and usage. Setting up. Operating. Maintenance.

   

(Heavy Moving Equipment)

Types, characteristics and purpose. Using.

   

(Other Erection Equipment)

Types and usage.

   

Erection Techniques (Evaluating Structures)

Types and characteristics.

   

(Shipping and Handling)

Loading and unloading structural steel and plate, and precast concrete.

   

(Slinging and Hooking-on)

Methods and procedures.

   

(Connecting)

Methods and procedures.

   

(Field Fabrication)

Methods and procedures.

   

(Plumbing and Alignment)

Methods and procedures for columns, spandrels, girts and elevator shafts.

   

Fastening Techniques (Welding)

Types of electrodes. Equipment. Methods and procedures.

   

(Bolting)

Types of bolts. Usage of bolting equipment. Methods and procedures.

   

(Rivetting)

Types of rivets. Usage of rivetting equipment. Methods and procedures.

   

(Heavy Structural Pins)

Installation.

   

Inspection and Testing (Weldments)

Inspection methods and procedures.

   

(Bolts)

Methods and procedures.

   

(Rivets)

Methods and procedures.

   

Safety Procedures

Knowledge of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and all safe practices of the trade.

     

Total Hours 872

2

Concrete Reinforcing

Drawings and Codes

Types of plans, placing plans, sections, schedules, Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute recommended practices and Canadian Standards Association A23-1960 standards, trade terminology, applicable reference tables and coding.

   

Types of Reinforced Concrete Construction

What is reinforced concrete — buildings, arches, shells, domes, bridges, bins and tanks — prestressed concrete, distinctive structure — reinforced concrete theory. Slip forming for continuous pour.

   

Application of Steel to Individual Members

Slabs, beams, joists, spandrel beams, columns, piers, footings, foundation mats, grade beams, sheet piling, bearing piles, caissons, retaining walls, cantilever slabs, cantilever beams, precast plank, slabs with hollow cores, double tees, stringers, abutments, wing wall single tees, tilt up slabs and fascia panels.

   

Reinforcing Bar Fabrication

Grades of steel, deformed or plain bars, standard and special sizes, bar lengths and bending; power and hand shears and benders, oxyacetylene equipment, bundling and tagging, bar markings and tolerances.

   

Application of Welded Wire Fabric

Common style, laps and placing temperature reinforecement, main reinforcement of solid slabs, slabs on ground.

   

Placing Bars in Structures

Receiving, checking, sorting preassembled units, handling by hand or power, placing according to approved shop drawings, bar supports and spacers, lappings, and splicing, tying and welding, repairs, permissible variations, mill scale removal, placement in individual members and structures, laying of pans and post tensioning of concrete.

   

Care and Use of Tools and Equipment

Chokers, slings, hoist signals, scales, and tapes, pliers, wire reel, bolt cutter, power shears, bar benders, hickey, oxyacetylene burning and welding equipment, arc welding equipment.

   

Inspection

General, check lists.

   

Safety Requirements

Knowledge of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and all safe practices of the trade.

   

Welding

Arc and processes other than arc welding for making joints in reinforcing steel.

     

Total Hours 1,070

3

Curtain Wall

Layout and Lines

Measuring job prior to starting work; establishing centres, checking masonry opening, use of plumb lines, dumpy level and transit level.

   

Handling Materials

Importance of special care of finished products such as fabricated aluminum and stainless steel. Methods of onsite storage of curtain wall materials and selection of storage areas.

   

Hoisting Materials

Hoists and tuggers, use of slings, chokers, spreaders, hoisting materials, palletized materials, pre-assembled frames.

   

Assembling on the Site

Planning the work, methods to be used, tool and equipment requirements, use of simple electric tools, drills, screw guns and application of sealants to joinery, working from shop drawings and auxiliary part lists or bills of materials, recognition of commonly used screws by size and type, recognition of fabrication errors or omitted operations by reference to shop drawings, corrective re-fabrication, knowledge of sizes of drill bits, taps and use of rivetting tools, knowledge of application of neoprene and polyvinyl chloride glazing and thermal separator strips. Distribution of assembled sections ready for erection.

   

Loose Connection of Curtain Wall Sections or Components

Erection by “stick” system, vertical mullions, horizontals spigotted in place. Erection of frame or panel system.

   

Line-up and Weld

Aligning and plumbing wall to previously established lines and centres. Bolting and shimming to suit. Freezing of anchors by welding. Use of level and transit.

   

Alternate Anchoring Systems

Inserts in concrete, masonry drilling, use of power actuated tools.

   

Application of Insulations

Perimeter, floor slab, spandrel pan and insulation, types of insulations and adhesives used.

   

Application of Interior Forms

Formed shapes, gutters, use of painted or porcelain enamel trims.

   

Installation of Sash into Curtain Wall

Hopper type centre pivotted, double hung.

   

Swing Stage Work (Manual and Electric)

How to erect and safety requirements for handling materials when working on a stage, application of spandrel panels, exterior mullions or trims. Rigging power tools for stage work. Moving swing stages. Exterior caulking from a swing stage.

   

Use of Caulking and Sealants

Knowledge of application method and limitations, use of hand caulking tools and air tools.

   

Installation of Formed Materials

Field fitting of copings and soffits.

   

Application of Protective Coatings and Paper

When is protection necessary? Precautions to be taken, removal procedures.

   

Installation of Doors, Entrances and Louvres

Methods of frame erection, butt, centre pivotted and off-set pivot doors, overhead closers, floor closers, automatic closers, glazing procedures for doors.

   

Installation of Punched Opening Frames and Sash

Checking opening, levelling and plumbing to ensure optimum operation of sash.

   

Installation of Operating Sash

Single and double hung sash. Side hinged, bottom hinged and top projected out casements. Centre pivoted sash.

   

Paperwork

Practical reading of architectural and shop drawings, understanding of architectural specifications, co-ordination of shop drawings, making reports in writing from out of town locations.

   

Built-up Stages

Erection Methods.

   

Safety Procedures

Knowledge of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and all safe practices of the trade.

   

Auxiliary Knowledge

Care and cleaning of aluminum and stainless steel; anodizing, extruding of aluminum; first aid.

     

Total Hours 770

4

Ornamental and Miscellaneous Ironwork

Drawings

Reading and understanding of shop drawings. Ability to co-ordinate product placement from shop and architectural drawings.

   

Layout and Lines

Checking masonry and concrete openings, establishing column centres, wall relations, and floor heights, use of plumb lines and levels.

   

Hoisting Materials

Use of hoists and tuggers, use of rope and tackle, slings.

   

Assembly and Installation

Assembling and installing by bolting and welding; standard stairs and fire escapes, spiral stairs, steel handrails, stainless steel, bronze and aluminum handrails, ladders and cages, catwalk framing, plate and grating flooring, collapsible gates, wire screens and grilles, wire partitions, fences and gates, flagpoles, mail chutes, ferrous and non-ferrous building fascias and panelling, canopies, doors, entrances and louvres related products.

   

Care and Clean-up of Stainless Steel and Non-Ferrous Materials

Use of abrasive and buffing equipment and materials.

   

Safety Requirements

Knowledge of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and all safe practices of the trade.

R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 1065, Sched. 2.