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Highway Traffic Act
Code de la route

ONTARIO REGULATION 316/03

operation of off-road vehicles on highways

Consolidation Period: From June 8, 2016 to the e-Laws currency date.

Last amendment: O. Reg. 181/16.

This Regulation is made in English only.

CONTENTS

PART I
DEFINITIONS

1.

Definitions

PART II
OPERATION ON CLASSES OF HIGHWAYS

2.

Operation on highways generally prohibited

3.

Prohibited highways

4.

Permitted provincial highways for certain off-road vehicles

4.1

Permitted municipal highways for certain off-road vehicles

5.

Highways on Crown lands or within provincial parks or conservation reserves

PART III
REGULATION OF OFF-ROAD VEHICLES ON HIGHWAYS

6.

Conditions for off-road vehicles to be operated on highways

Equipment Requirements

7.

Weight and width of multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles , etc.

7.1

Weight of all-terrain vehicles

8.

Tires

9.

Motor vehicle safety standards

10.

Equipment configuration and performance requirements

10.1

Safety equipment for multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles and recreational off-highway vehicles

11.

Equipment installed at time of manufacture and manufacturer’s label

12.

Braking system

13.

Lamps

14.

Windshield

15.

No obstruction of view

Operation Requirements

16.

Permit

17.

Insurance

18.

Driver’s licence conditions

19.

Helmet

19.1

Seat belts on multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles or recreational off-highway vehicles

19.2

Passengers on all-terrain vehicles

19.3

No passengers under the age of eight

19.4

No riding on a trailer

20.

Application of Highway Traffic Act

21.

Application of Off-Road Vehicles Act

22.

Maximum speed

23.

Environmental protection

24.

Rules of the road

PART IV
EXEMPTIONS

25.

Definitions

26.

Crossing a highway

27.

Farmers and trappers

28.

Public work functions

29.

Far northern Ontario and unorganized territory

Schedule A

Highways prohibited to all off-road vehicles

Schedule B

Highways permitted to all-terrain vehicles, multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles and recreational off-highway vehicles

Schedule C

Areas in far northern ontario and unorganized territory

 

part I
Definitions

Definitions

1. In this Regulation,

“all-terrain vehicle” means an off-road vehicle that,

(a) has four wheels, the tires of which are all in contact with the ground,

(b) has steering handlebars,

(c) has a seat that is designed to be straddled by the driver, and

(d) is designed to carry,

(i) a driver only and no passengers, or

(ii) a driver and only one passenger, if the vehicle,

(A) has one passenger seat that is designed to be straddled by the passenger while sitting facing forward behind the driver, and

(B) is equipped with foot rests for the passenger that are separate from the foot rests for the driver;

“multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle” means an off-road vehicle that,

(a) has four or more wheels, the tires of which are all in contact with the ground,

(b) has a steering wheel for steering control,

(c) has seats that are not designed to be straddled, and

(d) has a minimum cargo capacity of 159 kilograms;

“off-road vehicle” has the same meaning as in the Off-Road Vehicles Act;

“recreational off-highway vehicle” means an off-road vehicle that,

(a) has four or more wheels, the tires of which are all in contact with the ground,

(b) has a steering wheel for steering control,

(c) has seats that are not designed to be straddled, and

(d) has an engine displacement equal to or less than 1,000 cubic centimetres;

“seat belt assembly” means a device or assembly composed of a strap or straps, webbing or similar material that restrains the movement of a person in order to prevent or mitigate injury to the person. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 1; O. Reg. 135/15, s. 1.

Part II
Operation on classes of highways

Operation on highways generally prohibited

2. An off-road vehicle shall not be driven on any highway except,

(a) as specified in this Part;

(b) as permitted by Part IV; or

(c) as permitted by clause 2 (2) (a) of the Off-Road Vehicles Act.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 2.

Prohibited highways

3. Except as permitted by section 28, no off-road vehicle shall be driven on a highway listed in Schedule A.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 3.

Permitted provincial highways for certain off-road vehicles

4. (1) Subject to subsection (2), no off-road vehicle shall be driven on a highway listed in Schedule B. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 2.

(2) All-terrain vehicles, multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles and recreational off-highway vehicles may be driven on a highway listed in Schedule B if the requirements of Part III are met. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 2.

Permitted municipal highways for certain off-road vehicles

4.1 (1) Subject to subsection (2), an off-road vehicle may be driven on a highway or part of a highway in a municipality if,

(a) a by-law made by the municipality under subsection 191.8 (3) of the Act permits the operation of the off-road vehicle on the highway or part of the highway;

(b) the off-road vehicle is driven only during the months or hours specified in the by-law, in the case where the by-law limits the operation of the off-road vehicle on the highway or part of the highway within the municipality to certain months or hours; and

(c) the requirements of Part III are met. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 2.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to an off-road vehicle other than,

(a) an all-terrain vehicle;

(b) a multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle; and

(c) a recreational off-highway vehicle. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 2.

Highways on Crown lands or within provincial parks or conservation reserves

5. An off-road vehicle may be driven on a highway or part of a highway that is on Crown land administered under the Public Lands Act or that is within a provincial park or conservation reserve within the meaning of the Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, 2006, unless the operation of the off-road vehicle on the highway or part of the highway is prohibited by the road authority or is otherwise prohibited by law. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 2.

part Iii
regulation of off-road vehicles on highways

Conditions for off-road vehicles to be operated on highways

6. An off-road vehicle shall not be operated on a highway unless it meets the requirements of sections 7 to 15 and it is operated in accordance with sections 16 to 24.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 6.

Equipment Requirements

Weight and width of multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles , etc.

7. (1) If the off-road vehicle is a multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle, it must,

(a) weigh 1,814 kilograms or less; and

(b) have an overall width not greater than 2.03 metres, excluding mirrors. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(2) If the off-road vehicle is a recreational off-highway vehicle, it must,

(a) weigh 1,700 kilograms or less; and

(b) have an overall width not greater than 2.03 metres, excluding mirrors. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Weight of all-terrain vehicles

7.1 (1) If the off-road vehicle is an all-terrain vehicle that was manufactured after December 31, 2001, the weight carried on the all-terrain vehicle must not exceed the maximum weight capacity as shown on the overloading warning label affixed by the manufacturer. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the weight carried on the all-terrain vehicle includes the weight of the driver, any passenger, the cargo and accessories, and the trailer tongue weight, if any, but does not include the vehicle curb weight. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Tires

8. All the tires on the off-road vehicle must be inflated to the manufacturer’s recommended settings for normal operation. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Motor vehicle safety standards

9. If the off-road vehicle is an all-terrain vehicle, it must meet the motor vehicle safety standards prescribed for restricted-use motorcycles in the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations made under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Canada) applicable when the vehicle was manufactured. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Equipment configuration and performance requirements

10. If the off-road vehicle was manufactured after December 31, 2001, it must meet the equipment configuration and performance requirements set out in at least one of the following standards that are applicable to that class of off-road vehicle:

1. ANSI/SVIA-1-2001, entitled American National Standard for Four Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles — Equipment, Configuration, and Performance Requirements, approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. on February 15, 2001 and published by the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America.

2. ANSI/SVIA 1-2007, entitled American National Standard for Four Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles, approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. on July 23, 2007 and published by the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America.

3. ANSI/SVIA 1-2010, entitled American National Standard for Four Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles, approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. on December 23, 2010 and published by the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America.

4. ANSI/ROHVA 1-2011, entitled American National Standard for Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles, approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. on July 11, 2011 and published by the Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association.

5. COHV 1-2012, entitled Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council Standard for Four Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles, approved on September 26, 2012 and published by the Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council.

6. COHV 2-2012, entitled Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council Standard for Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles, approved on September 26, 2012 and published by the Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council.

7. ANSI/OPEI B71.9-2012, entitled American National Standard for Multipurpose Off-Highway Utility Vehicles, approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. on March 6, 2012 and published by the American National Standards Institute, Inc.

8. COHV 3-2013, entitled Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council Standard for Multipurpose Off-Highway Utility Vehicles, approved on April 3, 2013 and published by the Canadian Off-Highway Vehicle Distributors Council.

9. ANSI/ROHVA 1-2014, entitled American National Standard for Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles, approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. on September 24, 2014 and published by the Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Safety equipment for multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles and recreational off-highway vehicles

10.1 (1) If the off-road vehicle is a multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle, it must be equipped with an occupant protective structure and comply with subsection (3). O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(2) If the off-road vehicle is a recreational off-highway vehicle, it must be equipped with a roll-over protective structure and comply with subsection (3). O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(3) A multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle or a recreational off-highway vehicle must be equipped,

(a) with a handle or device that may be grasped by an occupant to provide support and to assist the occupant in keeping his or her arms and hands within the vehicle;

(b) for each seating position, with a seat belt assembly that is in good working order and that includes a strap or straps sufficient to restrain both the pelvis and the torso; and

(c) with a rear view mirror. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Equipment installed at time of manufacture and manufacturer’s label

11. (1) A component, equipment or other feature of the off-road vehicle that was part of the vehicle when manufactured and that is required by section 9, 10 or 10.1 must operate properly and must not be missing, partly or wholly inoperable or modified so as to reduce its effectiveness. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(2) A component, equipment or other feature of the off-road vehicle that is specified in the definition of “all-terrain vehicle”, “multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle” or “recreational off-highway vehicle” in section 1 or that is required by section 9, 10 or 10.1 must have been installed at the time the vehicle was manufactured. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(3) If the off-road vehicle was manufactured after December 31, 2001, it must display in plain view the label that was affixed to the vehicle at the time of its manufacture to show the manufacturer’s certification of the standard or standards listed in section 10 to which the vehicle conforms. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(4) If the off-road vehicle is an all-terrain vehicle manufactured after December 31, 2001, it must display in plain view the overloading warning label that was affixed to the vehicle at the time of its manufacture to show the maximum weight capacity. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Braking system

12. (1) The off-road vehicle must be equipped with service brakes that comply with the requirements set out in at least one of the standards listed in section 10 that are applicable to that class of off-road vehicle. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

(2) The off-road vehicle must be equipped with a parking brake or parking mechanism that complies with the requirements set out in at least one of the standards listed in section 10 that are applicable to that class of off-road vehicle. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 3.

Lamps

13. (1) Despite subsection 62 (1) of the Act, the off-road vehicle must be equipped with one or two lamps that emit a white light on the front of the vehicle and one or two lamps that emit a red light at the rear of the vehicle.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (1).

(2) The lamps required by subsection (1) must be lit at all times the off-road vehicle is operated on the highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (2).

(3) The subsections of section 62 of the Act that refer to lamps required under subsections (1), (2) or (3) of that section shall be read as if referring to the lamps required under subsection (1) of this section.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (3).

(4) The lamps required on the front of an off-road vehicle by subsection (1) must be aimed such that the high intensity portion of the beam is directed below the horizontal line through the centre of the lamp from which it comes, at a distance of 7.6 metres ahead of the lamp, when the vehicle is not loaded.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (4).

(5) If the off-road vehicle was manufactured after January 1, 1998, it must be equipped with a stop lamp or lamps on the rear of the vehicle that emit a red light when any service brake is applied. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (5); O. Reg. 135/15, s. 4 (1).

(6) A stop lamp required under subsection (5) may be incorporated with a rear lamp or may be a separate lamp.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (6).

(7) The off-road vehicle must be equipped with,

(a) one yellow reflex reflector on each side at the front;

(b) one red reflex reflector on each side at the rear; and

(c) one or more red reflex reflectors on the rear. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 13 (7); O. Reg. 135/15, s. 4 (2).

(8) The reflex reflectors required by subsection (7) must comply with the requirements of the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations made under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Canada) if those requirements were applicable to the vehicle when the vehicle was manufactured. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 4 (3).

Windshield

14. The off-road vehicle need not be equipped with a windshield, but if it is, the windshield must satisfy the requirements prescribed for a motorcycle windshield under subsection 1 (10) of Schedule 6 to Regulation 611 of the Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1990.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 14.

No obstruction of view

15. (1) There must not be any object or non-transparent material placed on or attached to the off-road vehicle that obstructs the driver’s view of traffic approaching from any direction at an intersection, or of traffic approaching from the rear of the vehicle.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 15 (1).

(2) If the off-road vehicle is towing a trailer, the trailer or load must not obstruct the driver’s view of traffic approaching from any direction at an intersection, or of traffic approaching from the rear of the vehicle.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 15 (2).

Operation Requirements

Permit

16. (1) The off-road vehicle shall not be operated on a highway unless a permit under section 5 of the Off-Road Vehicles Act has been issued in respect of that vehicle and a number plate showing the number of the permit is displayed on the vehicle as required under that Act. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 5.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to an off-road vehicle operated under the authority of a permit issued under section 7 of the Highway Traffic Act, as provided by section 7 of the Off-Road Vehicles Act.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 16 (2).

Insurance

17. The off-road vehicle shall be insured in accordance with section 2 of the Compulsory Automobile Insurance Act and section 15 of the Off-Road Vehicles Act.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 17.

Driver’s licence conditions

18. (1) The driver of the off-road vehicle shall hold a valid Class A, B, C, D, E, F, G, G2, M or M2 driver’s licence issued under the Act unless he or she is exempt, under section 34 of the Act, from the application of section 32 of the Act. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(2) If the driver of the off-road vehicle holds a Class G2 or Class M2 driver’s licence and is under the age of 20, there must not be, between the hours of midnight and 5 a.m., more than one passenger on the off-road vehicle who is under the age of 20, other than a person who is a member of the novice driver’s immediate family, as defined in subsection 6 (6) of Ontario Regulation 340/94 (Drivers’ Licences) made under the Act. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(3) Despite subsection (2), if the holder of the Class G2 or Class M2 driver’s licence has held a valid driver’s licence of that class for the immediately preceding six months or longer, the maximum number of passengers under the age of 20 allowed is three. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(4) The age distinctions in this section apply despite the Human Rights Code. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(5) Subsections (2) and (3) are subject to the requirements with respect to passengers set out in sections 19.1, 19.2 and 19.3. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

Helmet

19. (1) The driver of the off-road vehicle and every passenger on the vehicle shall wear a helmet that complies with section 19 of the Off-Road Vehicles Act. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(2) No person shall drive an off-road vehicle on a highway with a passenger on the vehicle unless the passenger is wearing a helmet as required by subsection (1). O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

Seat belts on multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles or recreational off-highway vehicles

19.1 (1) Every passenger on a multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle or a recreational off-highway vehicle on a highway shall,

(a) occupy a seating position for which a seat belt assembly has been provided; and

(b) wear the complete seat belt assembly as required by subsection (4). O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(2) No person shall drive a multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle or a recreational off-highway vehicle on a highway unless he or she is wearing a complete seat belt assembly as required by subsection (4). O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(3) No person shall drive a multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicle or a recreational off-highway vehicle on a highway with a passenger on the vehicle, unless the passenger is,

(a) occupying a seating position for which a seat belt assembly has been provided; and

(b) wearing the complete seat belt assembly as required by subsection (4). O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

(4) A seat belt assembly shall be worn so that,

(a) the strap of each restraint is securely fastened and worn firmly against the body in the intended position; and

(b) no more than one person is wearing any strap of the seat belt assembly at any one time. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

Passengers on all-terrain vehicles

19.2 No person shall drive an all-terrain vehicle on a highway with a passenger on the vehicle unless,

(a) the vehicle is designed to carry both a driver and a passenger; and

(b) the passenger is straddling the passenger seat behind the driver while facing forward with his or her feet securely on the separate foot rests intended for the passenger. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

No passengers under the age of eight

19.3 No person shall drive an off-road vehicle on a highway with a passenger on the vehicle who is under the age of eight. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

No riding on a trailer

19.4 No person shall drive an off-road vehicle on a highway while it is towing a trailer or any other attachment if there is a passenger on the trailer or other attachment. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 6.

Application of Highway Traffic Act

20. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this Regulation, the provisions of the Act and its regulations applicable to motor vehicles apply with necessary modifications to the operation of an off-road vehicle on a highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 20 (1).

(2) Subsection 62 (19), sections 64 and 66 and subsection 76 (1) of the Act do not apply to the operation of an off-road vehicle on a highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 20 (2).

Application of Off-Road Vehicles Act

21. The Off-Road Vehicles Act and the regulations made under that Act that apply to the operation of off-road vehicles off the highway apply with necessary modifications to the operation of an off-road vehicle on a highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 21.

Maximum speed

22. The off-road vehicle shall not be driven at a rate of speed greater than,

(a) 20 kilometres per hour, if the speed limit established under the Act for that part of the highway is not greater than 50 kilometres per hour; or

(b) 50 kilometres per hour, if the speed limit established under the Act for that part of the highway is greater than 50 kilometres per hour.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 22.

Environmental protection

23. (1) The off-road vehicle shall not be operated in such a manner as to,

(a) discharge a contaminant or cause or permit the discharge of a contaminant into the natural environment that may have an adverse effect on the environment or impair the quality of any waters; or

(b) contravene any conditions, restrictions and prohibitions imposed by any legislation and related regulations enacted to protect the environment.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 23 (1).

(2) The off-road vehicle shall not be operated in such a manner that it causes or is likely to cause,

(a) a risk to the safety of any person;

(b) harm or material discomfort to any person from dust, emissions or noise;

(c) harm, injury or damage, either directly or indirectly, to any property, flora or fauna; or

(d) alteration, disruption or destruction to the natural environment, including erosion damage or degradation of the right of way.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 23 (2).

(3) The off-road vehicle shall not be driven in or through a river, stream or other watercourse on a highway if doing so would or would be likely to alter, disrupt or destroy any fish habitat.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 23 (3).

Rules of the road

24. (1) The off-road vehicle shall be driven on the shoulder of the highway in the same direction as the traffic using the same side of the highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (1).

(2) Despite subsection (1), the off-road vehicle may be driven on the roadway in the same direction as the traffic using the same side of the highway if,

(a) there is no shoulder;

(b) the shoulder of the highway is obstructed and cannot be used by the off-road vehicle; or

(c) the shoulder is not wide enough to allow the off-road vehicle to be driven with all of its tires remaining completely off of the roadway. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (2); O. Reg. 135/15, s. 7 (1).

(3) Despite subsection (1), the off-road vehicle shall not be driven on the shoulder but shall be driven on the roadway in the same direction as the traffic using the same side of the highway if it is being driven across a level railway crossing.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (3).

(4) When driven on the shoulder of the highway, the off-road vehicle shall be driven as close to and parallel with the right edge of the shoulder as can be done practicably and safely.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (4).

(5) When driven on the roadway pursuant to subsection (2), the off-road vehicle shall be driven as close to and parallel with the right edge of the roadway as can be done practicably and safely.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (5).

(6) When entering the shoulder or the roadway, the off-road vehicle shall yield the right of way to vehicles already using the shoulder or the roadway, as the case may be, and shall enter the shoulder or roadway only when it is safe to do so.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (6).

(7) The off-road vehicle shall not be driven in the median strip of the highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (7).

(8) The off-road vehicle shall not be driven on any part of the highway that is designated as a construction zone under subsection 128 (8) of the Act or on any other part of the highway where construction work or highway maintenance is being carried out, unless the off-road vehicle is operating as a vehicle described in subsection 128 (13) of the Act or as a road service vehicle.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (8).

(9) If part or all of the highway is closed under subsection 134 (2) of the Act, the off-road vehicle shall not be driven on any adjacent part of the highway that may be open, unless the off-road vehicle is operating as a vehicle described in subsection 128 (13) of the Act or as a road service vehicle.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (9).

(10) The off-road vehicle shall not overtake and pass any moving motor vehicle or motorized snow vehicle at any time when both the off-road vehicle and the other vehicle are travelling on the same shoulder or roadway of the highway.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (10).

(11) Despite subsection (10), an off-road vehicle may overtake and pass another off-road vehicle when both are travelling on the shoulder if the movement can be made in safety while remaining on the shoulder and to the left of the off-road vehicle being overtaken and passed.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (11).

(12) If the off-road vehicle is an all-terrain vehicle, the person driving the all-terrain vehicle on the highway may, despite clause 142 (4) (b) of the Act, indicate the intention to turn right by extending the right hand and arm horizontally beyond the right side of the vehicle. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 7 (2).

(13) Before commencing a left turn in the manner required by subsection 141 (5), (6) or (7) of the Act, the off-road vehicle shall, without interfering with the movement of traffic travelling in the same direction as the off-road vehicle, move away from the shoulder or from the right edge of the roadway, as the case may be, and be positioned on the roadway in the position from which the left turn is to be made.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (13).

(14) Upon completing a left turn, the off-road vehicle shall, without interfering with the movement of traffic travelling in the same direction as the off-road vehicle, move back to the right edge of the roadway or shoulder, as the case may be.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 24 (14).

part iv
exemptions

Definitions

25. In this Part,

“emergency” means a situation that constitutes a danger to life or property;

“employee” means,

(a) a person employed in the service of the Crown or any agency of the Crown,

(b) a police officer, conservation officer or other person appointed for the preservation and maintenance of the public peace or any officer appointed for enforcing or carrying out the provisions of this Act or the Off-Road Vehicles Act,

(c) a firefighter as defined in the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997,

(d) an employee of an ambulance service as defined in the Ambulance Act,

(e) an employee of a municipality or of a local board as defined in the Municipal Affairs Act,

(f) an employee of a board, commission or other local authority exercising any power with respect to municipal affairs or purposes, or

(g) an employee or agent of the operator of a water, gas, electric heat, light or power works, telegraph and telephone lines, a railway, a street railway, works for the transmission of gas, oil, water or electrical power or energy or any similar works supplying the general public with necessaries or conveniences. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 25.

Crossing a highway

26. Part III of this Regulation does not apply to a person who drives an off-road vehicle directly across a highway pursuant to clause 2 (2) (a) of the Off-Road Vehicles Act.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 26.

Farmers and trappers

27. (1) Sections 7, 8, 9, 10, 10.1, 11 and 18 do not apply to the operation of an off-road vehicle as described in clause 2 (2) (b) of the Off-Road Vehicles Act if,

(a) the driver of the vehicle holds a valid driver’s licence; and

(b) the number of passengers on the off-road vehicle does not exceed the number of seating positions that were installed at the time the vehicle was manufactured. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 8 (1).

(2) Despite sections 4 and 4.1, an off-road vehicle may be operated as described in clause 2 (2) (b) of the Off-Road Vehicles Act on any highway other than a highway listed in Schedule A if the conditions described in clauses (1) (a) and (b) are met. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 27 (2); O. Reg. 135/15, s. 8 (2).

Public work functions

28. (1) An employee who is acting in the course of his or her employment or in response to an emergency may operate an off-road vehicle on a highway, including a highway listed in Schedule A or B, in accordance with this Regulation despite any provision that would provide otherwise in Parts II, IV and VI of the Act.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 28 (1).

(2) Sections 7, 8, 9, 10, 10.1, 11 and 18 do not apply to the operation of an off-road vehicle on a highway by an employee who is driving the off-road vehicle in the course of his or her employment or in response to an emergency if,

(a) the employee holds a valid driver’s licence; and

(b) the number of passengers on the off-road vehicle does not exceed the number of seating positions that were installed at the time the vehicle was manufactured. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 9 (1).

(3) Sections 4 and 4.1 do not apply to the operation of an off-road vehicle permitted under subsection (1). O. Reg. 316/03, s. 28 (3); O. Reg. 135/15, s. 9 (2).

(4) Despite section 24, an employee who is permitted under subsections (1) and (2) to operate an off-road vehicle on a highway listed in Schedule A may only drive the off-road vehicle on a part of the highway that is not the roadway or the shoulder.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 28 (4).

Far northern Ontario and unorganized territory

29. (1) A person may operate an off-road vehicle on a highway in an area of the province described in Schedule C in accordance with this Regulation despite any provision that would provide otherwise in Parts II, IV and VI of the Act.  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 29 (1).

(2) Sections 9, 10, 10.1, 11, 16 and 18 do not apply to the operation of an off-road vehicle on a highway in an area of the province described in Schedule C if,

(a) the driver of the off-road vehicle is at least 16 years old;

(b) the driver of the off-road vehicle holds a valid driver’s licence or motorized snow vehicle operator’s licence; and

(c) the number of passengers on the off-road vehicle does not exceed the number of seating positions that were installed at the time vehicle was manufactured. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 10 (1).

(3) Despite sections 4 and 4.1, an off-road vehicle may be operated on any highway other than a highway listed in Schedule A in an area of the province described in Schedule C if the conditions described in clauses (2) (a), (b) and (c) are met. O. Reg. 316/03, s. 29 (3); O. Reg. 135/15, s. 10 (2).

(4) This section does not apply with respect to a highway or part of a highway that is under the jurisdiction of a municipality if the municipality has by by-law prohibited the operation of the off-road vehicle on the highway or part of the highway. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 10 (3).

(5) This section does not apply with respect to a highway or part of a highway that is described in section 5 if the operation of the off-road vehicle is prohibited on the highway or part of the highway. O. Reg. 135/15, s. 10 (3).

30. Omitted (revokes other Regulations).  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 30.

31. Omitted (provides for coming into force of provisions of this Regulation).  O. Reg. 316/03, s. 31.

SCHEDULE A
HIGHWAYS PROHIBITED TO ALL OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

1. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 69, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 409, 410, 412, 416, 417, 420 and 427 and the Queen Elizabeth Way.

1.1 That part of the King’s Highway known as Highway 407 East.

1.2 The private toll highway known as Highway 407.

2. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 where that highway is contiguous with the King’s Highway known as No. 403.

3. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 24 where that highway is contiguous with the King’s Highway known as No. 403.

4. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 35 where that highway is contiguous with the King’s Highway known as No. 115.

5. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 58 where that highway is contiguous with the King’s Highway known as No. 406.

6. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 3 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the eastern limit of the roadway known as Ron McNeil Line (also known as Elgin County Road 52) where Ron McNeil Line continues as the roadway known as Ford Drive in the Township of Southwold and a point situate at its intersection with the west junction of the roadway known as Centennial Avenue in the Municipality of Central Elgin.

7. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 3 (also known as Huron Church Road) in the County of Essex lying between a point situate at its intersection with the westerly limit of the roadway known as Outer Drive in the Town of Tecumseh and a point situate at its intersection with the easterly limit of the roadways known as Industrial Drive and Northwood Street in the City of Windsor.

8. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 in the County of Haldimand lying between a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Argyle Street South and a point situate at its intersection with the southern limit of the roadway known as Seneca Greens Road.

8.1 That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the northerly limit of the King’s Highway known as No. 403 in the City of Burlington and the City of Hamilton and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 5 in the City of Hamilton.

9. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 401 in the Township of Puslinch and a point situate at its intersection with the south junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 where King’s Highway No. 7 continues as the roadway known as Wellington Street (also known as Wellington County Road 124) in the City of Guelph.

10. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 6 and 7 in the City of Guelph lying between a point situate at its intersection with the south junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 where King’s Highway No. 7 continues as the roadway known as Wellington Street (also known as Wellington County Road 124) and a point situate at its intersection with the north junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 where King’s Highway No. 7 continues as the roadway known as Woodlawn Road.

11. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 417 in the City of Ottawa and a point situate 150 metres measured easterly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as McNeely Avenue in the Town of Carleton Place.

12. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 in the City of Kitchener lying between a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Victoria Street and a point situate at its intersection with the east junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 8 where King’s Highway No. 8 continues as the roadway known as King Street.

13. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 7 and 8 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the eastern limit of the roadway known as Waterloo Road 5 in the Township of Wilmot and a point situate at its intersection with the east junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 8 where King’s Highway No. 8 continues as the roadway known as King Street in the City of Kitchener.

14. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 7 and 115 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the west junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 in the Township of Cavan Monaghan and a point situate at its intersection with the east junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 in the City of Peterborough.

15. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 8 in the City of Kitchener lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 401 and a point situate at its intersection with the east junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 7 where King’s Highway No. 7 continues as the roadway known as King Street.

16. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the City of Orillia lying between a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Memorial Avenue and a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Laclie Street.

17. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 11 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the south junction of the King’s Highway known as No. 17 in the City of North Bay and a point situate at its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Muskoka Road 169 (also known as Bethune Drive) in the Town of Gravenhurst in the District Municipality of Muskoka.

18. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 26 in the County of Simcoe lying between a point situate 50 metres measured westerly from its intersection with the centre line of the King’s Highway known as No. 7149 in the Town of Wasaga Beach and a point situate 50 metres measured easterly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Poplar Sideroad in the Town of Collingwood.

19. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 11 and 17 in the City of North Bay lying between a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Seymour Street and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 (also known as Algonquin Avenue).

20. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 11 and 17 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Lakeshore Drive in the Municipality of Shuniah and a point situate at its intersection with the centre line of the King’s Highway known as No. 130 in the Municipality of Oliver Paipoonge.

21. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 17 in the City of North Bay lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 (also known as Algonquin Avenue) and a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Gormanville Road.

22. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 17 in the City of Greater Sudbury lying between a point situate at its intersection with the middle junction of the roadway known as Municipal Road 55 and a point situate 1100 metres measured westerly from its intersection with the west junction of the roadway known as Municipal Road 55.

23. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 58 in the City of Thorold lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 406 and a point situate at its intersection with the westerly limit of the roadway known as Niagara Regional Road No. 57 (also known as Thorold Stone Road).

23.1 That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 60 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the centre line of the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the geographic township of Chaffey and a point situate 1000 metres measured westerly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Hidden Valley Road in the Town of Huntsville, in the District of Muskoka.

23.2. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 60 lying between a point situate 300 metres measured southerly from the middle of the Headstone Creek Bridge (at the east entrance of Algonquin Provincial Park) in the District of Nipissing and a point situate at its intersection with the northern boundary of the Township of Algonquin Highlands (being the westerly boundary of Algonquin Park), in the County of Haliburton.

24. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 61 in the City of Thunder Bay lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 and a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Chippewa Road.

25. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 69 in the Territorial District of Sudbury lying between a point situate 1890 metres measured southerly from its intersection with the centre line of the King’s Highway known as No. 637 in the Township of Servos and a point situate 1585 metres measured southerly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Estaire Road in the City of Greater Sudbury.

26. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 85 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 7 (also known as Victoria Street) in the City of Kitchener and a point situate 385 metres measured northerly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Waterloo Regional Road 15 (also known as King Street) in the Township of Woolwich.

27. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 115 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as Nos. 35 and 115 in the Municipality of Clarington and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 7 in the Township of Cavan Monaghan.

28. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 137 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 401 in the Township of Leeds and The Thousand Islands and a point situate 15 metres measured southerly from the south abutment of the Thousand Island Bridge.

29. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 7087 (also known as E. C. Row Expressway) in the City of Windsor in the County of Essex lying between a point situate at its intersection with the northerly limit of the King’s Highway known as No. 7902 (also known as Ojibway Parkway) and a point situate 365 metres measured easterly from its intersection with the centre line of the King’s Highway known as No. 3 (also known as Huron Church Road).

30. All of the King’s Highway known as No. 7274 (also known as Highway 6/Airport Road Connection).

31. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 7902 (also known as Ojibway Parkway) in the City of Windsor in the County of Essex lying between a point situate at its intersection with the northerly limit of the south junction of the roadway known as Broadway Street and a point situate at its intersection with the easterly limit of the Essex Terminal Railway right-of-way.

32. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 7908 (also known as Essex County Road 9/Howard Avenue Diversion) in the Town of Tecumseh in the County of Essex lying between a point situate at its intersection with the southerly limit of the King’s Highway known as No. 3 and a point situate at its intersection with the northerly limit of the roadways known as Laurier Parkway and South Talbot Road where the King’s Highway known as No. 7908 continues as the roadway known as Essex County Road 9.

O. Reg. 134/15, s. 1; O. Reg. 333/15, s. 1; O. Reg. 181/16, s. 1.

Schedule B
HIGHWAYS PERMITTED TO All-Terrain vehicles, multi-purpose off-highway utility vehicles and recreational off-highway vehicles

1. All of the Secondary and Tertiary highways known as and numbered 500 to 899, but not including that part of the Secondary highway known as No. 587 south of a point situate 3.6 km southerly from its intersection with the highway known as Pass Lake Cross Road in the Municipality of Shuniah, in the District of Thunder Bay, being within the boundary of Sleeping Giant Provincial Park.

2. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 7036 (also known as Potter Road in the Township of Newmarket), 7037 (also known as Hanna Road in the Township of Lamarche and the Township of Hanna), 7041 (also known as Main Street in the Township of Curtin), 7042 (also known as Old Wanup Road in the Township of Dill and Secord Road in the Township of Secord and the Township of Burwash), 7044 (also known as Old Cartier Road  in the Township of Cartier, the Township of Hart and the Township of Cascaden), 7140 (also known as Geneva Lake Mine Road in the Township of Moncrieff), 7151 (also known as Mesomikenda Lake Road in the Township of Neville and the Township of Chester), 7162 (also known as Ontario Street in the Township of Armour), 7182 (also known as Shebeshekong Road in the Township of Shawanaga and the Township of Carling), 7188 (also known as Katrine Road in the Township of Armour), 7279 (also known as Estaire Road in the Township of Dill and the Township of Burwash), 7285 (also known as Nelson Road in the Township of Burwash), 7286 (also known as Bentley Road in the Township of Dill), 7287 (also known as Shebeshekong Road in the Township of Carling), 7289 (also known as Lake Joseph Road in the Township of Seguin, the Township of Medora and the Township of Freeman), 7290 (also known as Lake Joseph Road in the Township of Seguin), 7291 (also known as Muskoka Road in the Township of Strong), 7292 (also known as Sinclair Lane in the Township of Strong), 7293 (also known as Green Road in the Township of Strong), 7294 (also known as Sunny Ridge Road in the Township of Strong), 7295 (also known as North Horn Lake Road in the Township of Strong), 7296 (also known as Valley View Road in the Township of Strong), 7297 (also known as South Service Road in the Township of Armour), 7298 (also known as Pickerel and Jack Lake Road and Berriedale Road in the Township of Armour), 7909 (also known as Nobel Road in the Township of Carling and the Township of McDougall) and 7910 (also known as Avro Arrow Road in the Township of McDougall).

3. That part of the King’s Highway known as Nos. 94, 105, 118, 124, 125, 127, 130 and 141.

4. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 4 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Huron County Road 12 (also known as Kippen Road) in the Municipality of Huron East, in the County of Huron, and a point situate at the north end of the structure known as the Bayfield River Bridge (at the southern boundary of the former Town of Clinton) in the Municipality of Central Huron, in the County of Huron.

5. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the south junction of the highway known as Bruce County Road No. 9 (also known as Colpoy Bay Road) in the Town of South Bruce Peninsula, in the County of Bruce, and a point situate 400 metres measured north of the centre line of the roadway known as Dyers Bay Road in the Municipality of Northern Bruce Peninsula, in the County of Bruce.

6. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Water Street in the Township of Tehkummah, in the District of Manitoulin, and a point situate 2,000 metres measured northerly from the centre line of the highway known as Whites Point Road in the Town of Northeastern Manitoulin and the Islands, in the District of Manitoulin.

7. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 lying between a point situate at 330 metres measured southerly from the middle of the swing bridge over the Little Current North Channel in the Town of Northeastern Manitoulin and the Islands in the District of Manitoulin and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Foster Drive in the Town of Espanola in the District of Sudbury.

8. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 8 lying between a point situate 1.3 kilometres measured westerly from the centre line of the western most intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 23, in the Municipality of West Perth, in the County of Perth, and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Centennial Drive in the Municipality of Huron East, in the County of Huron.

9. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 8 lying between a point situate 100 metres measured easterly from the centre line of the highway known as Huron Street in the Municipality of West Perth, in the County of Perth, and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Ransford Street in the Municipality of Central Huron, in the County of Huron.

10. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 9 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as West Heritage Street in the Township of Howick, in the County of Huron, and a point situate 500 metres measured southerly from the centre line of the roadway known as Bruce Road 6 East (also known as Absalom Street) in the Municipality of South Bruce, in the County of Bruce.

11. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 9 lying between a point situate 600 metres measured northerly from the intersection with the highway known as Bruce Road 24 (also known as Absalom Street) in the Municipality of South Bruce, in the County of Bruce, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 21 in the Municipality of Kincardine, in the County of Bruce.

12. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 11 lying between a point situate at its western most intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 71 east of the Settlement Area of Barwick, in the Township of Chapple, in the Reserve of the Manitou Rapids First Nation, in the District of Rainy River, and a point situate 300 metres measured easterly from the centre line of the highway known as Miller Street North at the eastern boundary of the Town of Rainy River, in the District of Rainy River.

13. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 11B lying between a point situate at its northern most intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the Town of Atikokan, in the District of Rainy River, and a point situate at its intersection with the Secondary Highway known as No. 622 in the District of Rainy River.

14. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 23 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 7 in the Township of Lucan Biddulph, in the County of Middlesex, and a point situate 1.1 kilometres measured southerly from its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 8 in the Municipality of West Perth, in the County of Perth.

15. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 23 lying between a point situate 1.1 kilometres measured northerly from its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 8 in the Municipality of West Perth, in the County of Perth, and a point situate at its intersection with the roadway known as Perth Line No. 44 in the Municipality of North Perth, in the County of Perth.

16. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 28 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Peterborough County Road 504 in the Township of North Kawartha, in the County of Peterborough, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 118 in the Town of Bancroft, in the County of Hastings.

17. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 28 lying between a point situate 880 metres measured easterly from the centre line of the highway known as Hastings Street in the Town of Bancroft, in the County of Hastings, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 41 in the Township of Addington Highlands, in the County of Lennox and Addington.

18. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 35 lying between a point situate 200 metres measured northerly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Horseshoe Lake Road in the Township of Minden Hills, in the County of Haliburton, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 60 in the Township of Lake of Bays, in the District of Muskoka.

18.1 That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 35 lying between a point situate at its southern most intersection with the roadway known as Haliburton County Road 121 in the Township of Minden Hills, in the County of Haliburton, and a point situate 4300 metres measured southerly from its intersection with the roadway known as Deep Bay Road in the Township of Minden Hills, in the County of Haliburton.

19. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 41 lying between a point situate at the Frontenac and the Lennox and Addington County Boundary (Bon Echo Provincial Park North Boundary) in the Township of Addington Highlands, in the County of Lennox and Addington, and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Renfrew County Road 512 (also known as Foymount Road) in the Township of Bonnechere Valley, in the County of Renfrew.

20. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 41 lying between a point situate 800 metres measured northerly from the centre line of its southern most intersection with the King’s Highways known as No. 60 (also known as Bonnechere Street) in the Township of Bonnechere Valley, in the County of Renfrew, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No.17 in the Township of Laurentian Valley, in the County of Renfrew.

21. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 60 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Cotieville Road in the Township of Horton, in the County of Renfrew, and a point situate at its intersection with a point measured 500 metres westerly from the centre line of the highway known as Ott Road in the Township of Bonnechere Valley, in the County of Renfrew.

22. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 60 in the County of Renfrew lying between a point situate 800 metres measured northerly from its intersection with the roadway known as Bridge Street in the Township of Bonnechere Valley and a point situate 800 metres measured easterly from its intersection with the roadway known as Renfrew County Road 62 South in the Township of Madawaska Valley.

23. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 60 lying between a point situate 500 metres measured westerly from the centre line of its western most intersection with County Road No. 62 in the Township of Madawaska Valley, in the County of Renfrew, and a point situate 300 metres measured southerly from the middle of the Headstone Creek Bridge (at the east entrance of Algonquin Provincial Park) in the District of Nipissing.

24. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 60 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the northern boundary of the Township of Algonquin Highlands (being the western boundary of Algonquin Park) in the County of Haliburton, and a point situate 1000 metres measured westerly from its intersection with the centre line of the roadway known as Hidden Valley Road in the Town of Huntsville, in the District of Muskoka.

25. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 61 lying between a point situate with the international boundary between Canada and the United States of America in the Municipality of Neebing, in the District of Thunder Bay, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 130 in the Municipality of Oliver Paipoonge, in the District of Thunder Bay.

26. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 62 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 7 in the Township of Madoc, in the County of Hastings, and a point situate 300 metres measured southerly from the centre line of the highway known as Bay Lake Road in the Town of Bancroft, in the County of Hastings.

27. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 62 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Hybla Road in the Municipality of Hastings Highlands, in the County of Hastings, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No.127 in the Municipality of Hastings Highlands, in the County of Hastings.

28. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 63 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Peninsula Road in the City of North Bay, in the District of Nipissing, and a point situate at its intersection with the boundary of the Province of Ontario and the Province of Quebec in the District of Nipissing.

29. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 64 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 69 in the Municipality of French River, in the District of Sudbury, and a point situate at its western most intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 17 in the Municipality of West Nipissing, in the District of Nipissing.

30. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 64 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Highway 17 in the Municipality of West Nipissing, in the District of Nipissing, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the District of Nipissing.

31. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 65 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the boundary of the Province of Ontario and the Province of Quebec, in the District of Timiskaming, and a point situate at its intersection with Armstrong Street in the City of Temiskaming Shores, in the District of Timiskaming.

32. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 65 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the City of Temiskaming Shores, in the District of Timiskaming, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 66 in the Township of Matachewan, in the District of Timiskaming.

33. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 66 lying between a point situate at its intersection with King’s Highway known as Highway No. 11 in the District of Timiskaming and a point situate at its intersection with the Secondary Highway known as No. 566 in the Township of Matachewan, in the District of Timiskaming.

34. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 72 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 17 in the District of Kenora and a point situate at its intersection with the railway tracks of the Canadian National Railway in the Municipality of Sioux Lookout, in the District of Kenora.

35. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 89 lying between a point situate 800 metres measured westerly from the centre line of its western most intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 10 in the Town of Shelburne, in the County of Dufferin, and a point situate 1.4 kilometres measured easterly from the centre line of the King’s Highway known as No. 6 in the Township of Wellington North, in the County of Wellington.

36. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 89 lying between a point situate 1.8 kilometres measured westerly from its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 6 in the Township of Wellington North, in the County of Wellington, and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as County Road 2 in the Town of Minto, in the County of Wellington.

37. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 101 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the boundary of the Province of Ontario and the Province of Quebec in the Township of Black River-Matheson, in the District of Cochrane, and a point situate at the middle of the bridge over the Black River in the Township of Black River-Matheson, in the District of Cochrane.

38. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 101 lying between a point situate at its western most intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the Township of Black River-Matheson, in the District of Cochrane, and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Peninsula Road in the City of Timmins, in the District of Cochrane.

39. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 101 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 144 in the City of Timmins, in the District of Cochrane, and a point situate 75 metres measured easterly from the centre line of the highway known as Gladstone Avenue in the Municipality of Wawa, in the District of Algoma.

40. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 108 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 17 in the Township of The North Shore, in the District of Algoma, and a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Esten Drive South in the City of Elliot Lake, in the District of Algoma.

41. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 112 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the District of Timiskaming and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 66 in the Town of Kirkland Lake, in the District of Timiskaming.

42. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 118 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Haliburton Lake Road 14 in the Municipality of Dysart et al, in the County of Haliburton, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 11 in the Town of Bracebridge, in the District of Muskoka.

43. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 118 lying between a point situate at its intersection with a point 500 metres measured easterly from the centre line of the highway known as Fred Jones Road in the Municipality of Dysart et al, in the County of Haliburton, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 28 in the Township of Faraday, in the County of Hastings.

44. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 129 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway know as No. 17 in the Town of Thessalon, in the District of Algoma, and a point situate at its southern most intersection with the roadway known as Old Highway 129 in the Township of Chapleau, in the District of Sudbury.

45. Revoked: O. Reg. 181/16, s. 2 (13).

46. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 132 lying between a point situate at 1.5 kilometres measured west of the centre line of the highway known as Renfrew County Road 33 (also known as Lochiel Avenue) in the Town of Renfew in the County of Renfrew and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 41 in the Township of Bonnechere Valley in the County of Renfrew.

47. That part of the King’s Highway known as No. 144 lying between a point situate at its intersection with the highway known as Old Cartier Road in the Geographic Township of Cartier, in the District of Sudbury, and a point situate at its intersection with the King’s Highway known as No. 101 in the City of Timmins, in the District of Cochrane.

48. Revoked: O. Reg. 135/15, s. 11 (5).

O. Reg. 316/03, Sched. B; O. Reg. 135/15, s. 11; O. Reg. 181/16, s. 2.

Schedule C
areas in Far northern ontario and unorganized territory

1. The areas in the districts of Kenora and Thunder Bay north of the railway tracks of the Canadian National Railways passing through the municipalities of Malachi, Minaki, Quibell, Sioux Lookout, Savant Lake, Armstrong and Nakina.

2. The area in the Territorial District of Cochrane north of 50 degrees latitude.

3. The area in the Territorial District of Algoma north of the railway tracks of the Canadian Pacific Railway passing through the municipalities of Amyot, Franz and Missanabie.

4. All highways that are in unorganized territory and that are under the jurisdiction and control of a road authority other than the Ministry.

O. Reg. 316/03, Sched. C.