January 11, 2016

The Honourable Kathleen Wynne
Premier of Ontario
Room 281, Main Legislative Building
Queen's Park
Toronto, Ontario
M7A 1A1

Dear Premier:

I am pleased to report on the Ministry of Energy’s progress on the commitments identified in my mandate letter.

Our mission is to provide Ontarians with a clean, reliable and affordable supply of electricity, guided by our 2013 Long-Term Energy Plan (LTEP).

Putting Conservation First

  • In January 2015, Ontario launched its new six-year Conservation First Framework, which is expected to achieve seven terawatt-hours (TWh) of savings in 2020, and help achieve our conservation target of 30 TWh in 2032.
  • Local distribution companies are making new and innovative programs available to help families and businesses save money on their electricity bills.
  • A new six-year Demand Side Management Framework enables continued delivery of natural gas conservation programs.

Mitigating Electricity Prices for Residential Consumers

  • For a typical Ontario residential consumer, current electricity prices are below those forecast in the LTEP.
  • Beginning January 1, 2016, the Ontario Electricity Support Program is providing ongoing assistance directly on the bills of eligible low-income electricity consumers.
  • We have also removed the Debt Retirement Charge (DRC) from all residential consumers’ bills.

Mitigating Electricity Prices for Businesses

  • We expanded the Industrial Conservation Initiative effective July 2015, reducing the eligibility threshold to three megawatts (MW) from five MW
  • We are planning to remove the DRC for commercial, industrial and other non-residential electricity users for consumption beginning April 1, 2018, nine months earlier than previously estimated.
  • A new application window of the Industrial Electricity Incentive offered reduced electricity rates for eligible companies through a competitive process; to date, the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) has awarded 22 contracts to energy-intensive companies starting or expanding operations in Ontario.

Championing Locally Supported Renewable Energy

  • With approximately 15,200 MW of wind, solar, bioenergy and hydroelectric energy online, Ontario is positioned to meet the LTEP target of having 20,000 MW of clean energy online by 2025.
  • Launched in 2014, the new Large Renewable Procurement program includes requirements to help ensure that local needs are taken into account before contracts are offered.
  • As announced in January 2015, the expanded Lower Mattagami hydroelectric complex is providing 438 MW of new, clean generation. Thunder Bay Generating Station was converted from coal to advanced biomass in early 2015, and the Atikokan Generating Station is the largest 100 per cent biomass facility in North America.

Refurbishing Nuclear Power Plants

  • In November 2015, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) submitted to the ministry its budget and schedule for refurbishment of four nuclear units at Darlington, representing 3,500 MW of emissions–free, low-cost electricity supply. We are reviewing these estimates and implementing continued government oversight of the project, to ensure OPG can complete the refurbishments efficiently and effectively.
  • OPG continues to make investments to improve the performance of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station through to at least 2020 and continues to evaluate options related to Pickering’s end-of-life date.
  • In December 2015, Ontario updated its contract with Bruce Power and will proceed with the refurbishment of six nuclear units at the Tiverton-based site. Our updated contract secures 6,300 MW of emissions-free, low-cost electricity supply and protects the interests of electricity consumers by ensuring Bruce Power assumes full risk for any potential cost overruns or delays.

Strengthening Partnerships with Aboriginal Communities

  • The ministry will continue to work within the principles of the recent Political Accord and continue to uphold the commitments in the LTEP for involving First Nation and Métis communities in new generation and transmission projects, as well as in conservation and community energy planning initiatives.
  • We have responded to a request by the Chiefs of Ontario to create a forum, the First Nations-Ontario Energy Table, to discuss energy-related issues and concerns unique to Aboriginal communities.

Helping Develop a Canadian Energy Strategy

  • The Canadian Energy Strategy was adopted by Canada’s premiers in July 2015. Under the leadership of provincial and territorial ministers of energy, four committees will be formed (energy efficiency, delivery of energy, climate change and a transition to a lower-carbon economy, and technology and innovation) that will identify initiatives of mutual interest that may be implemented to enable further co-operation between jurisdictions in meeting the shared goals of the strategy. The ministers will report back to premiers in 2016.

Protecting Ontario’s Interests in Pipeline Development

  • Ontario has been proactive in its approach to the Energy East pipeline project and will participate in the National Energy Board (NEB) regulatory review. The province asked the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) to undertake a review of the proponent’s application. The OEB report, released in August 2015, will inform Ontario’s participation in the NEB regulatory proceeding, and provides advice on ensuring balance between the economic and environmental risks of the project and the expected benefits for Ontarians.
  • Ontario and Québec have formed a working group to identify common interests and positions concerning the Energy East project. This working group will remain active throughout the regulatory proceeding.

In addition to these key priorities, the ministry is making progress on the following:

  • The Initial Public Offering (IPO) of Hydro One has now closed with approximately 16 per cent of the shares in the company now trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbol “H”. Approximately $1.8 billion in total gross proceeds were raised through the IPO. With this transaction, the government remains on track to realize approximately $9 billion in net proceeds. Of these net proceeds, $5 billion will go toward debt and $4 billion will support the Trillium Trust, which, in turn, will be used to fund investments in transit, transportation and other priority infrastructure projects. The government plans to continue with subsequent share sales in the future, ultimately selling down to approximately 40 per cent ownership.
  • Regional electricity planning is underway or complete in 14 of Ontario’s 21 electricity regions. Planning in the remaining regions will begin by 2018. Regional plans promote conservation and consider other cost-effective solutions, such as local generation, transmission and distribution investments.
  • We are actively promoting Ontario’s energy expertise by attracting investment to the province and by promoting our industry and knowledge abroad.
  • In May 2015, Ontario and Québec finalized a seasonal electricity capacity sharing agreement that takes advantage of the fact that electricity demand peaks in the winter in Québec and in the summer in Ontario.
  • At the joint meeting of Cabinet ministers on September 11, 2015, Ontario and Québec signed a Memorandum of Understanding to explore the potential for a medium-term electricity trade agreement. The two provinces are mandating their agencies, Ontario’s IESO and Hydro-Québec Energy Marketing, to engage in discussions on an agreement that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, provide value to Ontario ratepayers and complement other government policy initiatives.
  • We continue to invest in technologies that modernize our electricity grid, particularly through our Smart Grid Fund, which has spurred economic development and innovation.
  • We are working with the Ministry of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure, as well as Enbridge, Union Gas and local communities, to find creative and affordable opportunities to expand natural gas availability.
  • The ministry’s agencies continue to identify opportunities to achieve savings and efficiencies. The IESO and the Ontario Power Authority have successfully merged, and between 2012 and 2014 Hydro One and Ontario Power Generation achieved combined efficiency savings of approximately $500 million.

The ministry is committed to continuing its work on the mandate letter priorities.

Sincerely,

Bob Chiarelli signature

Bob Chiarelli
Minister of Energy

Results achieved

Mandate Letter Commitment Progress to Date
Lead efforts to deliver on what continues to be our government’s top energy priority — providing Ontarians with a clean, reliable and affordable supply of electricity.
  • In May 2015, Ontario and Québec finalized a seasonal electricity capacity sharing agreement.
  • Since 2003, approximately $15 billion has been invested to enhance and renew Hydro One’s systems, including upgrades to over 15,000 kilometres of power lines (including both transmission and distribution lines).
  • We plan to launch consultations on the next Long-Term Energy Plan (LTEP), with a continuing mandate to ensure Ontario has a supply of clean, reliable and affordable power.
This includes bringing on new, clean generation and ensuring investment in the transmission system to maintain grid reliability and serve new demand. It remains vitally important to manage the electricity supply mix prudently. Through integrated regional planning, you will identify solutions to meet regional needs, based on consultations that consider unique local requirements, circumstances and community priorities.
  • As announced in January 2015, the expanded Lower Mattagami hydroelectric complex is providing an additional 438 MW of new, clean generation.
  • Atikokan Generating Station is the largest 100 per cent biomass facility in North America.
  • Thunder Bay Generating Station was successfully converted from coal to advanced biomass in early 2015, putting Ontario on the leading edge of advanced biomass research worldwide. 
  • Since 2003, approximately $15 billion has been invested to enhance and renew Hydro One’s systems, including upgrades to over 15,000 kilometres of power lines (including both transmission and distribution lines).
Continuing to implement the 2013 LTEP, which lays out our government’s long-term vision for Ontario’s energy system.
  • The ministry is making progress in implementing Conservation First by launching electricity and natural gas conservation frameworks.
  • The ministry held stakeholder consultations on a net metering program concept proposal from August to October 2015 and is in the process of developing a new program design.
  • The ministry will be holding consultations in early 2016 on requiring the adoption of Green Button for electricity, natural gas and water utilities in Ontario.
Ensuring that energy conservation continues to be one of our key goals as we implement the LTEP. This means helping ease the burden of rising energy costs on Ontario’s ratepayers by pursuing conservation — wherever cost-effective — to meet energy needs when and where we need it.
  • The Conservation First Framework was launched in January 2015 to support provincewide and local electricity conservation programs.
  • The natural gas Demand Side Management framework was launched in December 2014 to support natural gas conservation programs.
  • The ministry has updated the energy efficiency regulation for products and appliances three times since the release of the 2013 Long-Term Energy Plan (LTEP), and the fourth update came into force on January 1, 2016.
Implementing a Conservation First approach to energy planning, approval and procurement processes. You will do so by continuing to work with your ministry’s agencies and with other ministers, including the President of the Treasury Board, the Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure, and the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing.
  • The Ministry of Energy has updated its agency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to include the policy of Conservation First.
Ensuring that the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) and the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) prioritize the implementation of Ontario’s Conservation First approach to invest in conservation first, before new generation, where cost-effective.
  • The conservation was considered first in the 2013 LTEP demand forecast.
  • The Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) is working with local distribution companies (LDCs) to implement the Conservation First Framework.
  • The Conservation First policy is considered in the province's regional planning process.
Working with the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) to incorporate the Conservation First policy into local distributor planning processes for electricity and natural gas utilities — and the natural gas demand side management framework under development.
  • A directive was issued to the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) to put conservation first in distributor planning for electricity and natural gas distributors.
  • The OEB now requires electricity distributor filing requirements to consider conservation.
  • Natural gas utilities are studying the potential role of conservation in deferring infrastructure investments.
  • The Demand Side Management Framework launched in December 2014.
Continuing to help Ontarians by addressing the challenges they face from increasing electricity costs. You will continue to look for savings and efficiencies that will help keep electricity costs affordable for residential consumers.
  • The Conservation First Framework and natural gas Demand Side Management frameworks both support the delivery of residential conservation programs in Ontario to help homes save on their energy bills.
  • The Ontario Electricity Support Program (OESP) is providing an ongoing rate reduction directly on the bills of eligible low-income electricity consumers starting January 1, 2016.
Developing and implementing a new residential electricity assistance program to help make electricity more affordable, particularly for low-income families, who spend a proportionately higher percentage of their income on energy and electricity.
  • The OEB has been tasked with developing and implementing the Ontario Electricity Support Program, which is providing ongoing assistance directly on the bills of eligible low-income electricity consumers starting January 1, 2016, when the Ontario Clean Energy Benefit ended.
  • Intake for the program began in the fall and the program has been in place since January 1, 2016.
Working with the Ministry of Finance to deliver on our commitment to remove the Debt Retirement Charge (DRC) from residential electricity bills after December 31, 2015. Residential ratepayers will benefit significantly from this change, and it is important that you ensure its effective implementation.
  • Regulatory amendments have been completed by the Ministry of Finance and Ministry of Energy related to this initiative, and letters from the Minister of Energy have been sent to bill issuers with further direction.
  • The Debt Retirement Charge (DRC) has been removed from residential electricity bills for consumption after December 31, 2015.
Continuing to implement initiatives that support Ontario’s businesses by helping them address rising energy costs. I ask that you lead our efforts to meet our commitment in the LTEP to ensure that — where possible and appropriate — industrial electricity rate mitigation programs help support a dynamic and innovative climate for business to thrive, grow and create jobs.
  • The Industrial Electricity Incentive offered reduced electricity rates for companies starting or expanding operations in Ontario.
  • To date, IESO has awarded 22 contracts to energy-intensive companies across the province through the program.
Helping to reduce energy costs for small business owners by implementing a five-point business energy savings plan, including on-bill financing and the expansion of saveONenergy for Business programs.
  • The ministry developed a Five-Point Small Business Energy Savings Plan to help small businesses conserve energy, manage costs and save money.
  • The plan promotes the use of energy conservation managers, markets business conservation programs, works to make on-bill financing available and provides long-term stable funding for conservation initiatives.
Working with the Ontario Power Authority to implement a new stream of the Industrial Electricity Incentive program. This will provide electricity cost relief to companies that are able to establish or expand operations in Ontario.
  • The Industrial Electricity Incentive (IEI) offered reduced electricity rates for companies starting or expanding operations in Ontario.
  • To date, the Independent Electricity Service Operator (IESO) has awarded 22 contracts to energy-intensive companies across the province through the program.
Proceeding with expansion of the Industrial Conservation Initiative (ICI). This will allow more businesses to benefit from lower electricity rates by shifting energy use away from peak periods — which, in turn, will benefit all electricity consumers by decreasing the need for costly peak generation.
  • The government expanded the ICI program.
  • Effective July 2015, the eligibility threshold was reduced from 5 MW to 3 MW for consumers whose primary business is manufacturing, mining, refrigerated warehousing, greenhouses or data processing.
Continuing to lead our government’s commitment to renewable energy, with the aim of having 20,000 megawatts of renewable energy online by 2025. You will continue to monitor progress toward targets for wind, solar, bioenergy and hydroelectricity as part of Ontario energy reporting.
  • The Ministry of Energy continues to monitor progress towards the 2025 renewable energy target of 20,000 MW.
  • Progress toward the 20,000 MW target is reported regularly as part of the Ontario Energy Report, which is available online at: www.ontarioenergyreport.ca/
Continuing to work with the ministry’s agencies to implement a new competitive procurement process for renewable energy projects larger than 500 kilowatts that will take into account local needs and considerations.
  • The Large Renewable Procurement (LRP) program provides municipalities with a stronger voice in the development of renewable energy projects, while ensuring value for ratepayers.
  • The proposal submission period for the first round of LRP (LRP I) closed on September 1, 2015. IESO indicates that 103 proposals totaling 3,613 MW were submitted under LRP I, which has a procurement target of 565 MW.
Continuing to respect the contracts that have been signed with energy producers, while always ensuring that these contracts enable the delivery of sustainable, affordable energy to Ontario’s ratepayers.
  • The IESO continues to respect all contracts signed with electricity producers.
  • By the end of 2014, IESO had executed nine contracts representing 550 megawatts with the province's non-utility generators.
  • The Ministry of Energy continues to work with IESO to provide guidance on the overall renewable energy policy direction.
  • IESO continues to manage electricity generation contracts to ensure a cost-effective supply of energy.
Working with the ministry’s agencies and with municipal partners to ensure that municipalities participate meaningfully and effectively in the decision-making process for the placement of renewable energy projects, including wind and natural gas.
  • The new competitive Large Renewable Procurement (LRP) program includes mandatory community engagement requirements and also allocates points to proposals that demonstrate community engagement over and above the mandatory requirements.
Ensuring that timelines for meeting the LTEP’s energy storage procurement targets are met and that they address the regulatory barriers that limit the ability of energy storage technologies to compete in Ontario’s electricity market. As well, you will explore opportunities to build on the pilot projects through additional procurement.
  • The procurement target of 50 MW of storage resources concluded in November 2015 with the announcement of nine new energy storage contracts.
  • These projects will inform ongoing work on resolving regulatory barriers to energy storage, as they will provide valuable information about the technologies' ability to supply grid services and the appropriate commercial arrangements to enable them.
Working with Ontario Power Generation and Bruce Power to ensure that the crucial refurbishment of 10 nuclear units at the Darlington and Bruce generating stations over the next 16 years is completed efficiently and effectively.
  • In November 2015, Ontario Power Generation submitted to the ministry its budget and schedule for refurbishment of four nuclear units at Darlington.
  • Ontario Power Generation is on track to commence refurbishing the first unit of Darlington in October 2016, subject to shareholder concurrence.
  • OPG continues to make investments to improve the performance of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station through to at least 2020 and continues to evaluate options related to Pickering’s end-of-life date.
  • In December 2015, Ontario updated its contract with Bruce Power and will proceed with the refurbishment of six nuclear units at the Tiverton-based site starting in 2020.
Working with the Minister of Research and Innovation and with the Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure to continue with implementation of smart meters, smart grid technologies and advancements in customer service and choice.
  • The Smart Grid Assessment and Roadmap report finds a net benefit of $3.8 billion - $9.0 billion for continued smart grid investment.
  • The Smart Grid Forum has released a discussion paper on approaches to utility innovation in Ontario. The ministry is considering the recommendations to realize this value.
  • The Smart Grid Fund supports 28 technology projects. A new call for applications has concluded, and the ministry is reviewing applications.
  • The OEB continues to work with utilities on incorporating smart grid technologies into infrastructure planning.
Working with the Minister of Finance and the President of the Treasury Board to consider recommendations from the Advisory Council on Government Assets on how to maximize the potential of Hydro One and Ontario Power Generation. Your goal is to ensure that Ontarians receive the value they deserve from these government enterprises.
  • On July 17, 2015, the province appointed a new board of directors for Hydro One Inc., to oversee the company as it prepared to become publicly traded, with a renewed focus on customer service excellence and improved performance and reliability.
  • On August 20, 2015, Mayo Schmidt was announced as the Chief Executive Officer of Hydro One. The final prospectus was filed with the Ontario Securities Commission on October 29, 2015.
  • The IPO of shares in Hydro One closed and approximately $1.8 billion in total gross proceeds were raised. With this transaction, the government remains on track to realize approximately $9 billion in net proceeds.
  • Of these net proceeds, $5 billion will go toward debt and $4 billion will support the Trillium Trust, which, in turn, will be used to fund investments in transit, transportation and other priority infrastructure projects.
  • The government plans to continue with subsequent share sales in the future, ultimately selling down to approximately 40 per cent ownership.
  • The province is also moving forward with the advisory council's recommendation to merge Hydro One Brampton with three other large utilities - PowerStream, Enersource and Horizon.
Working with the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) and the IESO to implement legislation merging the two agencies into a single entity. Your goal is a smooth transition that achieves savings and efficiencies for energy ratepayers.
  • The merger took effect January 1, 2015. IESO and OPA are now operating as one organization.
  • The 2016 business plan for the new IESO was submitted to the ministry on September 2, 2015, and is currently under review.
Continuing to work with local distribution companies to ensure that they operate as efficiently as possible and produce savings that will benefit Ontario’s ratepayers. They will do so through options such as voluntary consolidations and innovative partnerships.
  • The province intends to proceed with a sale of Hydro One Brampton to PowerStream, Enersource and Horizon.  Once full shareholder approvals are received, the OEB will review the transaction.
  • The Ministry of Finance has posted proposed amendments to the regulatory registry to reduce transfer tax rates on the sale of publicly owned LDCs to private firms, exempt small MEUs from transfer taxes and capital gains portions of the departure tax.
  • OEB Scorecard: Facilitates comparisons across LDCs to put pressure on underperforming LDCs.
Encouraging municipalities and Aboriginal communities to develop their own community-level energy plans — and identify conservation opportunities and infrastructure priorities — as part of our commitment in the LTEP. You will support these efforts through the Municipal Energy Plan Program and the Aboriginal Community Energy Plans Program.
  • The ministry has approved 13 municipalities for funding under the Municipal Energy Plan (MEP) program including: Chatham-Kent, Kingston, Markham, Newmarket, Temiskaming Shores, Vaughan, Wawa, Woodstock, Sault Ste. Marie, Region of Waterloo, Windsor, Caledon and Middlesex Centre.
  • The Aboriginal Community Energy Plan (ACEP) program, administered by the Independent Electricity System Operator, continues to offer funding support of up to $95,000 to Aboriginal communities to develop their own community energy plans.
  • To date, 44 communities have received funding. Additional funding recipients will be announced soon.
  • In June 2015, updates to MEP program materials were made to clarify that the program is eligible to all Ontario municipalities. Earlier versions of program materials targeted small and medium-sized municipalities.
  • The Minister of Energy communicated the MEP program updates in a letter to the Chair of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario Task Force.
Working with other ministries and agencies to ensure that First Nation and Métis communities are consulted on any energy activity that could adversely affect their Aboriginal or treaty rights. Our government has recognized that Aboriginal participation in the energy sector is one of the keys to the economic development of First Nation and Métis communities.
  • Continued co-ordination with other ministries to ensure that the duty to consult is met on any energy projects/activities that have the potential to impact Aboriginal and treaty rights.
  • This includes delegation of certain procedural aspects of consultation to proponents and providing oversight.
  • Participation in interministerial working groups to improve co-ordination and consistency in approaches.
Continuing to support and encourage participation by First Nation and Métis communities in new generation and transmission projects — and in conservation initiatives. You will do so through programs such as the Aboriginal Energy Partnerships Program.
  • New Aboriginal conservation programs being developed under the Conservation First Framework.
  • The Aboriginal Renewable Energy Fund recently closed in advance of the launch of the Energy Partnerships Program.
  • Once launched, the new program will provide Aboriginal communities with development and partnership funding for renewable energy projects, as well as partnership funding for transmission projects.
  • There are approximately 60 First Nation and Métis communities and groups involved in wind, solar and hydroelectric projects across the province.
  • These communities and groups are participating in more than 500 different projects, representing over 1,500 MW of clean energy capacity. This includes approximately 800 MW of Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) contracted projects and contract offers, and approximately 700 MW in non-FIT generation.
Connecting remote communities is a priority for Ontario. Success in connecting remote communities will depend on contributions from all of the parties that will benefit from it, which includes the federal government. The province looks forward to a fair cost-sharing agreement with its federal counterparts to make sure this project becomes a reality for First Nation communities.
  • IESO released an updated technical report and business case for the connection of remote communities in August 2014.
  • The analysis indicates that transmission connection of up to 21 communities would result in savings relative to the continued use of diesel generation in remote communities over the next 40 years. Savings would accrue to the federal government and provincial ratepayers who currently subsidize the costs of diesel.
  • Ontario has provided data and analysis to the federal government to support its business case, and discussions with the federal government are ongoing.
  • Recognizing the unique nature of this project, new funding and cost recovery mechanisms are being considered by Ontario.
  • In July 2015, Ontario joined Manitoba, Québec, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories and Yukon in establishing a Pan-Canadian Task Force to reduce the use of diesel fuel to generate electricity in remote communities.
  • The task force will be a forum for sharing information and best practices for electricity service in remote communities. Key objectives are identifying barriers to diesel reduction and opportunities for collaboration.
You will also work with the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, the federal government, and other agencies and ministries as needed to ensure communities are positioned to benefit from grid connection or a reduction in their dependence on diesel. This will support stronger, healthier northern remote communities by reducing barriers to growth, increasing economic development opportunities, ensuring access to clean energy, and improving social and living conditions for residents.  For those communities where connection to the provincial grid is not viable, you will promote local options, such as renewable energy generation, to help reduce reliance on diesel fuel.
  • The Remote Electrification Readiness Program, administered by the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, supports communities in developing readiness plans to prepare for connection to the provincial grid.
  • The new Energy Partnerships Program, in development, will include a funding stream to assist those communities that are not identified as economic to connect to the provincial grid to explore renewable energy solutions.
Working with the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and with the Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure to develop and support ways to promote Ontario’s energy expertise abroad. This will include nuclear refurbishments, the elimination of dirty coal generation, smart grid implementation and technical expertise in transmission and distribution.
  • The ministry supported Research and Innovation Minister Moridi's nuclear/smart grid mission to South Korea in April 2015 and hosted South Korean and Indian reverse smart grid trade missions October 5 to 9, 2015.
  • We are engaging the energy industry to identify opportunities to support the Premier’s Mission to India in January/February 2016 and planning an international conference on key energy issues for October 2016.
  • We are working with partners such as the Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade and the Advanced Energy Centre to identify high-value export markets and develop strategies to support entry by Ontario's energy industry.
Collaborating, including across borders, on the development of a strategy to ensure a clean, reliable and sustainable energy supply. You will work with other ministers, including the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, of Intergovernmental Affairs, and of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure on the development of a Canadian Energy Strategy with other provinces and territories. The strategy should balance national interests with the unique profiles, priorities and needs of individual provinces and territories.
  • At the Annual Premiers’ Conference on July 17, 2015, premiers adopted the Canadian Energy Strategy (CES).
  • Under the leadership of provincial and territorial ministers of energy, four committees will be formed (energy efficiency, delivery of energy, climate change and a transition to a lower-carbon economy, and technology and innovation) to enable further cooperation between jurisdictions in meeting the shared goals of the CES. Ministers of energy are to report back to premiers in 2016.
  • Establishment of the Pan-Canadian Task Force on Reducing Diesel Use in remote communities will support the creation of a clean, reliable and sustainable energy supply for remote First Nation and Métis communities.
Ensuring that the strategy includes co-ordinated efforts to improve energy efficiency and conservation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, foster innovation in the energy sector and facilitate the safe transportation and transmission of energy. You will work with the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change to encourage federal partnership in addressing the climate change challenge — which is both local and global in scale.
  • The CES is guided by principles that are designed to promote an environmentally and socially responsible energy sector through initiatives such as carbon pricing, while also promoting developments in conservation and energy efficiency.
Ensuring that the strategy facilitates electricity imports and exports between Ontario and its neighbouring provinces by identifying barriers, solutions and opportunities for the development of interconnected transmission infrastructure.
  • The CES is guided by principles that are designed to ensure a secure supply of energy for all Canadians through open and safe energy transportation and transmission networks to allow for enhanced production and distribution of clean and low-carbon energy.
  • On September 11, 2015, Ontario and Québec signed an MOU to explore a medium-term agreement for energy that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide savings to Ontario ratepayers.
Supporting programs led by the Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure (MEDEI) to help ensure that Ontario residents and industries are able to share in affordable supplies of natural gas. These programs, outlined below, will give consumers in underserved communities more energy choices, make commercial transportation more affordable, attract new industry to Ontario and benefit our agricultural producers.
  • The Ministry of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure (MEDEI) initiated stakeholder consultations and released Building Ontario Up – Discussion Guide for Moving Ontario Forward – Outside the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), seeking input on natural gas loan and grant program design.
  • The Ministry of Energy is working with MEDEI on natural gas expansion strategy.
Helping the Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure establish and implement a new Natural Gas Access Loan. Our government will provide up to $200 million over two years through this program to help communities partner with utilities to extend access to natural gas supplies.
  • MEDEI initiated stakeholder consultations and released Building Ontario Up – Discussion Guide for Moving Ontario Forward – Outside the GTHA, seeking input on natural gas loan and grant program design.
  • The Ministry of Energy is working with MEDEI on a natural gas expansion strategy.
Helping the Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure establish and implement a $30 million Natural Gas Economic Development Grant to accelerate projects with clear economic development potential.
  • MEDEI initiated stakeholder consultations and released Building Ontario Up – Discussion Guide for Moving Ontario Forward – Outside the GTHA, seeking input on natural gas loan and grant program design.
  • The Ministry of Energy is working with MEDEI on a natural gas expansion strategy.
Continuing to intervene in regulatory hearings about major pipeline proposals that directly affect Ontario. You will ensure that these interventions are consistent with Ontario’s six pipeline principles, as outlined in the LTEP.
  • Ontario has been proactive in its approach to Energy East and will participate in the National Energy Board (NEB) regulatory review.
  • In November 2013, the province asked the OEB to review the application. The OEB report was released on August 13, 2015, and will inform Ontario’s participation in the NEB regulatory proceeding. The report provides advice on ensuring an appropriate balance between the economic and environmental risks of the project and the expected benefits for Ontarians.
  • In November 2014, Ontario and Québec formed a working group to identify common interests and positions.
  • Collaborated with the OEB to strengthen the Aboriginal consultation requirements of the environmental guidelines for the location, construction and operation of hydrocarbon pipelines and facilities in Ontario.
  • Engaged with the Ontario Pipeline Coordinating Committee to review environmental assessment documents and ensure adequate Aboriginal consultation has taken place.
Updated: August 16, 2021
Published: January 08, 2016