Ministry overview

Ministry's vision statement

The Ministry of Energy (ENERGY) is responsible for the provincial energy sector, striving to make Ontario strong, healthy, prosperous, and open for business.

Ministry core commitments and key deliverables

ENERGY sets the legislative and policy framework to ensure all Ontarians have a safe, reliable, clean and affordable energy supply, distribution and transmission, and choices in their energy use. ENERGY develops and advises on all aspects of energy policy for Ontario, including electricity, natural gas, petroleum products and low-carbon fuels.

A top priority of the government is to reduce electricity bills for families, farms and small businesses. As part of this commitment, ENERGY provides electricity rate mitigation which provides direct relief on eligible residential, farm, and small business electricity bills, in addition to removing a portion of the cost of renewable energy contracts.

ENERGY works with partners and stakeholders to develop policies supporting cost-effective energy supply, transmission and distribution systems; to consider and advance innovative solutions and technologies; to promote energy conservation and energy efficiency; and to power the economy so that Ontario is Open for Business.

ENERGY is responsible for Government Business Enterprises whose incomes contribute to the fiscal plan. This reflects contributions from Hydro One Limited (Hydro One) and the wholly owned Ontario Power Generation (OPG). It also oversees the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) and the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO).

COVID-19 Response

ENERGY has continued to play a central role in the provincial COVID-19 response, providing relief support to families, farms and businesses severely impacted by the pandemic. The Ministry’s actions included:

Pricing changes for regulated price plan customers

As part of the province’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak and public health measures put in place, ENERGY has acted quickly to provide direct rate relief for those billed through the Regulated Price Plan (RPP), which includes residential, small business and farm customers.

ENERGY's support to RPP customers also included the continued offering of customer choice of price plans, allowing RPP customers to choose to be billed at tiered or time-of-use (TOU) rates.

Extensions to energy efficiency project deadlines in response to supply chain disruptions.

ENERGY and the IESO have helped to mitigate COVID-19-related impacts on businesses and institutions who have been put at risk of not receiving energy-efficiency incentives, by extending the completion deadlines for projects contracted under legacy electricity conservation and demand management (CDM) program frameworks (the 2015-2019 Conservation First Framework and the 2019-2020 Interim Framework).

Ministry programs

ENERGY carries out its mandate under three activities: Ministry Administration, Energy Development and Management, and Electricity Price Mitigation.

Ministry administration program

Ministry Administration provides executive direction and strategic business and resource planning services to ensure the efficient and effective delivery of ministry programs. It supports ministry operations through advice and services in the areas of human resources, business planning, accounting and administration, and professional support services such as legal and audit services. It provides core strategic support in the areas of corporate/strategic policy, communications (including French language services), and freedom of information requests.

Energy development and management program

The Ministry is responsible for developing Ontario’s energy policy framework, which is central to the building of a strong and prosperous economy.

Energy conservation programs

Energy conservation helps to cost-effectively meet energy system needs and to make energy bills affordable for Ontarians. The ministry provides policy guidance or direction and oversees a suite of cost-effective conservation and energy efficiency programs – funded by electricity and natural gas ratepayers – which have evolved in the province over the last 30 years.

Electricity conservation and demand management (CDM) programs are delivered by the IESO and funded through the electricity rate base through the Global Adjustment. Natural gas conservation demand side management (DSM) programs are delivered by Enbridge Gas Inc., with oversight of the OEB, and funded through the respective electricity and natural gas ratepayers.

A 2021-2024 electricity CDM Framework is in place with funding of up to $692M over four years, focused on cost-effectively meeting electricity system and customer needs. The Framework is providing continued energy conservation opportunities for customers who need them most, including commercial, industrial, institutional, First Nations and income-eligible consumers. It also features increased competitive procurements and calls for proposals in order to improve cost-effectiveness and solicit consumer-based solutions.

As of Q2 2022, the IESO is in the midst of a Mid-Term Review (MTR) of the 2021-2024 CDM Framework that is considering the alignment of the CDM program offerings with energy system and consumer needs in Ontario. As part of the MTR, the IESO will make recommendations to inform changes for the last two years of the Framework (i.e., 2023 and 2024).

The IESO is also reviewing the results of its Energy Efficiency Auction pilot as part of the MTR, which will help inform future competitive procurement approaches for CDM.

ENERGY is working with the IESO to leverage the province’s world-class clean electricity grid by developing a voluntary clean energy credit (CEC) registry. A CEC registry in Ontario could help businesses meet their environmental and sustainability goals, support ratepayers by enabling proceeds from CEC sales to flow to the rate base and help our efforts to further decarbonize by supporting investment in new clean or renewable generation.

Separately, the OEB has approved Enbridge’s delivery of its suite of DSM programs offered from 2015-2021 into 2022, with a 2022 budget of $132M, while reviewing Enbridge’s application for 2023-2027 programming.

Conservation Programs for Residential Low-Income and First Nation Customers

  • Electricity
    • IESO's Energy Affordability Program (EAP) helps income-eligible households manage their energy costs by providing in-home energy assessments and electricity saving measures and upgrades at no cost. EAP is available province-wide, including on First Nation reserves. The EAP replaces two previous programs for low-income and income-eligible customers – the Home Assistance Program and the Affordability Fund program, respectively – streamlining and simplifying access to energy savings measures for those in need.
    • First Nation Conservation Programs are distinct from province-wide CDM programs, as they are customized to assist on-reserve First Nation communities to provide building energy efficiency measures. During the term of the 2021-2024 CDM Framework, the IESO extended programs that were offered under the previous Interim Framework, to allow services which had been disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic to be completed: The First Nation Conservation Program, Conservation on the Coast, and the Remote First Nation Pilot Program (for soon-to-be-connected First Nation communities) provide free home energy efficiency assessments and energy savings measures. Going forward, First Nation communities continue to have access to the EAP.
  • Natural Gas Conservation Programs
    • Delivered by Enbridge Gas, the Home Efficiency Rebate and Residential Adaptive Thermostats programs provide financial incentives to residential natural gas customers for making energy efficient home upgrades.
    • The Home Winterproofing program, delivered by Enbridge Gas, provides income-eligible customers with free home improvements such as insulation and draft proofing and is coordinated with the IESO's EAP. This program is also delivered to on-reserve First Nation communities connected to Enbridge services.
  • Business Programs
    • Electricity conservation programs, delivered by the IESO, provide financial incentives and training to help businesses reduce their electricity use and manage costs through energy audits, retrofits, and process and system improvements, and is also transitioning to include greater opportunities for competitive procurements and calls for proposals to solicit customer-based solutions.
    • The Small Business program offers small business customers turn-key solutions that identify and install standardized lighting and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) measures.
    • Through the Local Initiatives Program, the IESO is working with LDCs in four target areas in the province to help demonstrate the use of targeted CDM as a cost-effective resource to help address known regional and/or local system needs.
    • The Industrial Energy Efficiency Program is a new customer-focused program launched in April 2022 for large transmission and distribution connected industrial consumers with an emphasis on process improvements and system optimization projects.
    • A new First Nation Community Buildings Retrofit Program (CBRP) was launched in July 2022, and targets Band-owned commercial and institutional buildings located on-reserve.
  • Natural gas conservation programs, delivered by Enbridge Gas, provide businesses with incentives for efficient building equipment and systems retrofits such as space heating, water heating and food services equipment.
  • Other energy conservation and demand response initiatives
    • The Industrial Conservation Initiative (ICI) allows all electricity consumers with average peak monthly electricity demand over one megawatt (MW), as well as manufacturers and greenhouses over 500 kilowatts (kW), to lower their electricity costs by reducing their demand during the top five peak hours of the year. The outcome benefits companies financially and benefits the electricity system by deferring the need for new peak generation. The IESO transitioned from a demand-response auction to a capacity auction to enable competition between additional resource types and put downward pressure on prices. The IESO held its second capacity auction in December 2021, resulting in a summer clearing price ($264.99/MW-day) that was higher than the first capacity auction ($197.58/MW-day) but lower than any of the IESO demand-response auctions held since December 2015. The winter clearing price ($60.00/MW-day) was significantly lower than any of the previous IESO auctions. Demand-response providers represented the majority of capacity procured.

On April 1, 2022, the government approved changes to the Industrial Consultation Initiative (ICI) that came into effect May 1, 2022. The changes reduced the regulatory burden for participants of the program and address other concerns raised by stakeholders during the 2019 Consultation on Industrial Prices. The most notable change to the program is the use of real-time Ontario demand as the basis for determining the five peak hours under ICI, which is aimed at improving cost visibility for ICI participants.

Green Button

On August 26, 2021, ENERGY brought forward, and the government passed a regulation requiring electricity and natural gas distribution companies in Ontario to provide people and businesses with their energy consumption data through the Green Button energy data standard by November 1, 2023.

Green Button lets customers download their natural gas and hourly electricity data in a standardized format from their utility and authorize the secure transfer of this data to applications of their choice. This data can then be accessed on their smartphone or computer. These apps can also analyze the energy data and provide customers with helpful energy-saving tips to reduce their energy bills and personalized retrofit options to achieve long-lasting savings.

An affordable, reliable energy supply

Over 90 per cent of the electricity generated in Ontario in 2021 was emissions-free. Nuclear energy provided approximately 55 per cent of Ontario’s electricity generation, and hydroelectric stations provided approximately 23 per cent of Ontario’s electricity generation. Nuclear and hydropower are Ontario’s reliable sources of round-the-clock “baseload” power. The remainder of the electricity supply comes from a mix of natural gas, wind, solar and bioenergy.

According to the IESO, Ontario is forecasted to have an emerging supply need in 2025-26, that grows through the latter part of the decade. This is a result of the upcoming closure of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, refurbishment schedules of other nuclear facilities, expanding electrification and increasing business investment in the province.

In order to fill this forecasted supply gap, the IESO will need to procure electricity products and services from existing and new resources.

The Ministry is committed to a procurement framework that ensures Ontario has an affordable, reliable, and clean electricity system. This is achieved when resources are procured largely through competitive processes and in a transparent and cost-effective manner. On January 27, 2022, a directive to the IESO was issued to design and undertake multiple procurement mechanisms to meet the supply requirements forecasted by the IESO. These include procuring existing resources through the first Medium-Term Request for Proposals (MT RFPs 1) and future MT RFPs, re-contracting Calstock Generating Station, designing the first Long Term RFP (LT RFP) to procure new build resources, designing a program for existing small hydroelectric facilities, and assessing the suitability of a program for existing larger hydroelectric facilities.

On March 31, 2022, the IESO published the 2022 Annual Acquisition Report (AAR), which showed that capacity needs will be meet through procurement plans, including those from the January 27th directive.

Incentives for early in-service dates for the first LT RFP, a forward capacity auction, an expedited process for same-technology expansions at existing facilities that can enter into service in 2025, an expedited procurement for new-build facilities able to enter service in 2025, and additional Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) programming will also support the province in meeting the electricity capacity need.

The Ministry supports Ontario’s commitment to nuclear energy as a reliable, cost-effective, and emission-free source of electricity. Ontario is progressing with refurbishment of four nuclear units at Darlington Nuclear Generating Station and six at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station over the next 12 years. In 2020 the province announced it was supporting Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) plan to safely extend the life of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, to help meet electricity system needs and provide clean and reliable power during the Darlington and initial Bruce refurbishments during the mid-2020s.

In addition, Ontario is leading the way on the development of next-generation small modular reactors (SMRs) in collaboration with partner provinces (i.e., Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Alberta). SMRs could provide clean energy and economic opportunities for Ontario’s nuclear supply chain. OPG has selected GE Hitachi as its SMRs technology partner and is currently progressing with detailed planning and preparation to deploy Canada’s first grid-scale SMRs at the Darlington new nuclear site by 2028, pending government and regulatory approvals.

Ontario is committed to keeping the cost of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and natural gas affordable for families and businesses. Ensuring a reliable supply of fuels is vital for the province’s economy. As such, Ontario supports the continued operation of Enbridge’s Line 5, which is a key artery that connects North American crude oil to Ontario. Since 2019, the Government of Michigan has taken several legal actions to shut-down Line 5. Ontario is continuing to work with the Government of Canada, our provincial partners, U.S. States and Enbridge to ensure that Line 5 remains in operation.

In April 2022, Ontario released its Low-Carbon Hydrogen Strategy which sets out a vision to accelerate the development of a low-carbon hydrogen economy in the province that will create jobs and reduce emissions. The strategy leverages the province’s strengths, including a highly skilled workforce, clean and affordable electricity, existing storage and pipeline infrastructure, and an innovative industrial sector that is poised to collaborate on hydrogen. The strategy showcases immediate actions and future areas of work to continue collaborating with the private sector, the federal government, Indigenous communities, academic institutions and other stakeholders to support the development of Ontario’s low-carbon hydrogen economy.

Electricity price mitigation program

The Ontario Electricity Rebate (OER) is a transparent on-bill rebate, provided to eligible residential, farm and small business consumers. The percentage of the OER has been adjusted over time as electricity costs change in order to manage the trajectory of the average residential bill.

The government has reduced the frequency of rate setting for consumers charged under the Regulated Price Plan (RPP). As of January 1, 2022, RPP rates are now set once per year, on November 1st, as opposed to twice per year, subject to certain limited exceptions, to provide RPP consumers greater rate stability.

As of January 1, 2021, large and mid-sized industrial and commercial consumers are automatically benefitting from lower electricity bills. Through the Comprehensive Electricity Plan (CEP), the government is funding a portion of non-hydro renewable energy contract costs, so they are no longer being paid by electricity consumers. In 2022, industrial consumers are forecast to see savings of about 15% on their bills, while mid-sized commercial consumers could see savings of about 17% on their bills. Actual savings depend on location and consumption.

Effective January 1, 2022, government is also funding the above-market costs of re-contracted existing biomass electricity generators in northern Ontario through the CEP, as announced in the 2021 Fall Economic Statement.

Furthermore, a suite of electricity rate mitigation programs continues to help Ontarians manage electricity costs.

Eligible consumers can also receive support on their electricity bills through the following programs:

  • Distribution Rate Protection and Rural or Remote Rate Protection provides delivery charge relief for customers of certain prescribed local distribution companies (LDCs).
  • The Ontario Electricity Support Program (OESP) helps eligible low-income consumers by providing a monthly on-bill credit. Credit amounts range from $35 to $75 per month based on household size and income. Enhanced credit amounts, from $52 to $113 per month, are available for customers that are Indigenous, use electric heat, or rely on an approved energy-intensive medical device.
  • The Northern Ontario Energy Credit helps eligible low-to-middle-income northern residents manage energy costs. For the 2022 benefit year, qualifying individuals can receive up to $162 annually and qualifying families (including single parents) can receive up to $249 annually.
  • The First Nations Delivery Credit provides a 100 per cent credit for delivery or service charges for all on-reserve First Nations residential customers of licensed electricity utilities.

Conservation and demand management programs

In-person delivery of electricity and natural gas conservation programs were paused in Spring 2020 in accordance with local and provincial public health policies as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak and associated physical distancing policies and resumed in June 2021. Program intake and back-office functions continued.

ENERGY continues to work with the IESO to understand and address the need for extensions to project in-service deadlines for certain electricity conservation projects and programs, and the OEB is doing the same in its role overseeing Enbridge Gas’ natural gas DSM programs.

Extensions to in-service deadlines of CDM projects contracted under the Conservation First Framework (in place from January 2015 – March 2019) have been implemented three times to date through the issuance of Ministerial Directives (on July 22, 2020, June 10, 2021, and December 09, 2021). The most recent extended deadline for these projects is August 31, 2022, with possibility of another four months of extension to December 31, 2022, that would be available to the projects that meet prescribed set of criteria. CDM projects under the Retrofit and the Process and Systems Upgrade streams of the Interim Framework (2019-2020) have also had in-service deadline extensions December 31, 2022, and June 30, 2023, respectively.

The intent of these extensions has been to help mitigate the effect of COVID-19 disruptions on commercial, institutional, and industrial customers by allowing projects more time to complete.

Ensuring a reliable, safe power supply

In response to the COVID-19 global pandemic, major private and public electricity and natural gas entities are implementing plans to ensure critical operations are maintained with minimum staff on-site. ENERGY is working closely with these entities to help address concerns related to proactive testing, staff management, and equipment and supplies needed to ensure business continuity. The Ministry has also been working closely with these entities and relevant ministries to advise on the government’s COVID-19 policies relevant to the energy sector (e.g., declaration of essential businesses and emergency childcare for frontline workers). In order to ensure an effective response and plan for recovery, ENERGY convened sector leaders in a Ministerial Advisory Council and contributed to cross-government recovery planning through the Electricity Sector Strategy.

2022-23 Strategic plan

On March 24, 2021, the government released Ontario’s Action Plan: Protecting People’s Health and Our Economy, signifying the next phase of Ontario's response to COVID-19. The Ministry of Energy is supporting Ontario’s Action Plan through the following programs and initiatives.

Long-term energy planning reform

The Ministry is reviewing Ontario’s long-term energy planning framework to increase the effectiveness, transparency, and accountability of energy decision-making in Ontario. Empowering independent, agency-led planning will protect the interests of ratepayers, improve investment certainty, and restore confidence in energy decision-making.

As part of this process, ENERGY invited individuals, organizations, and Indigenous partners to share their ideas and perspectives on how to best to achieve these goals. In general, stakeholders expressed support for undertaking reforms to Ontario’s long-term energy planning process in line with the stated principles. Key themes present across submissions included:

  • The need for clear, high-level government policy direction;
  • The importance of integrated, coordinated planning across energy sectors;
  • A focus on independent, agency-led planning;
  • The importance of independent planning oversight, with an emphasis on the role of the OEB as independent regulator; and
  • The need for enhanced stakeholder and public participation.

In response to the advice received, the Ministry is moving forward with two key initiatives in support of integrated long-term planning:

  1. Establishment of an Electrification and Energy Transition Panel that will provide essential expertise and advice to the Minister on how to coordinate long-term energy planning, considering growing energy demand, emerging technologies, environmental considerations and affordability.
  2. Commissioning of an independent, cost-effective pathways study to better understand how to optimize technology and prepare the energy system for electrification.

Together, the Panel and Study will provide an effective pathway to improved long-term planning and the electrification of energy services. Integrated planning will benefit both ratepayers and energy companies by creating a more predictable investment environment, making life more affordable and Ontario more competitive.

Natural gas expansion

In December 2018, the government passed the Access to Natural Gas Act, 2018. This legislation facilitates expansion of natural gas by charging existing gas customers $1 per month to help improve the economic viability of prescribed natural gas projects that would otherwise be uneconomic to build.

Ontario announced that the OEB would be accepting proposals for Phase 2 projects starting March 5, 2020. The OEB ultimately received 210 eligible proposals with a combined funding request of $2.6 billion, far exceeding the original allocation of $130 million. As a result, the government increased the budget to $234 million and applied a selection methodology that resulted in a portfolio of 28 projects that best advance the objectives of the program, and which will ultimately provide natural gas to 43 communities across the province. These projects were prescribed in regulation in June 2021. Design, permitting, and construction of a number of projects is well underway, and all are required to have applied for leave to construct (where necessary) no later than December 31, 2025. Funds for the program are collected from existing natural gas ratepayers and do not impact the province’s finances.

In response to continued demand for more affordable energy in rural Ontario, a third phase of the program was announced in the 2022 Ontario Budget. Scoping is underway and will be informed by stakeholder consultations anticipated to be launched in fall 2022.

Ontario’s energy transition and electrification

Clean Home Heating Initiative

Pending final approvals of the 2022 Ontario Budget, ENERGY has allocated up to $4.5 million to fund a Clean Home Heating Initiative, in partnership with Enbridge Gas Inc., that would help families in London, St. Catharines, Peterborough, and Sault Ste. Marie keep costs down. This provincial initiative would build on a 100-home Hybrid Heating Pilot Program which was launched last summer in the City of London, to reach up to 1,000 homes.

Electric heat pumps operate like an air conditioner in the summer but can also operate in reverse in cooler seasons to provide home heating. With the addition of smart controls, a hybrid heating system automatically switches between the heat pump and a home's existing natural gas furnace, depending on which source is least expensive while also achieving greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Today, buildings remain the third largest source of emissions in Ontario, after transportation and industry. This initiative would be expected to reduce a household’s energy bills by up to $80 per year, and their greenhouse gas emissions by up to 30%.

Ultra-low overnight Time-of-Use (TOU) price plan

In November 2021, the Minister of Energy requested that the OEB examine and provide advice by April 1, 2022, on the design of a new optional enhanced TOU price plan to further incent demand-shifting away from peak periods to lower-demand periods. The objectives established in the Minister’s letter were to provide more customer choice, prepare the electricity system for electrification, and support decarbonization.

The new price plan would include an ultra-low overnight rate. Shifting electricity use to overnight hours would make better use of Ontario’s clean electricity supply when province-wide demand is low, increasing grid efficiency, and generating value for all Ontario ratepayers. An ultra-low overnight rate could also further support decarbonization by using more nighttime electricity, which is typically generated from non-emitting resources.

The government will consider the OEB's report along with stakeholder feedback received through the Ministry’s recent proposal on the Environmental Registry of Ontario and the OEB's consultation held earlier this year, with the intent of enabling distributors to make the new price plan available to their customers beginning May 1, 2023, or as soon as possible thereafter. All LDCs will be required to offer the new price plan by November 1, 2023.

Keeping energy costs low for families, small businesses and farmers

As provincial efforts turn to recovering from COVID-19, ENERGY is focused on supporting Ontarians by helping to keep the cost of energy low for families, small businesses and farmers. ENERGY's suite of electricity rate mitigation programs are integral in keeping electricity rates stable.

ENERGY continues to deliver the Ontario Electricity Rebate (OER) program, which provides direct relief on eligible residential, farm and small business electricity bills. Additionally, as part of the CEP, the government is removing a portion of the cost of renewable energy contracts from consumers’ electricity bills.

ENERGY and the IESO are looking for opportunities to expand and enhance CDM programming in the province to contribute to addressing emerging electricity system needs, including responding to the needs of growing greenhouses sector as identified in the 2022 Annual Acquisition Report and as part of the IESO's Mid-Term Review (MTR) of the 2021-2024 CDM Framework, now underway.

Ontario also recently made changes to expand the net metering framework to provide further opportunities for consumers to save on their electricity bills and achieve their sustainability goals. Net metering is a billing arrangement between an electricity customer and their local distribution company (LDC) that allows the customer to generate electricity for their own use using renewable generation systems. When the customer generates more than what they need at any given time, that electricity is sent to the grid for a credit on their electricity bill.

As of July 1, 2022, regulatory amendments came into effect that clarify the eligibility of third-party ownership arrangements, including leasing, financing and power purchase agreements with third party generators. These changes broaden access to net metering for more Ontarians by allowing third-party energy service providers to finance the upfront capital costs of renewable generation systems.

Table 1: Ministry Planned Expenditures 2022-23 ($M)
COVID-19 Approvals0.0
Other Operating$6,575.2
Other Capital$26.1
Total$6,601.3

Detailed financial information

Table 2: Operating and Capital Summary by Vote
Votes/ProgramsEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2019-20*footnote 1 ($)
Operating ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2901-01 Ministry Administration12,983,40022,4000.212,961,00012,090,60012,567,636
2902-01 Energy Development and Management28,877,100(30,486,600)(51.4)59,363,700313,458,200919,781,349
2905-01 Electricity Price Migration6,273,650,600(217,531,000)(3.4)6,491,181,6006,316,583,7005,538,561,914
Total Operating Expense to be Voted6,315,511,100(247,995,200)(3.8)6,563,506,3006,642,132,5006,471,000,899
Statutory Appropriations66,014(22,378)(25.3)88,39288,41488,346
Ministry Total Operating Expense6,315,577,114(248,017,578)(3.8)6,563,594,6926,642,220,9146,471,089,245
Consolidation - Independent Electricity System Operator211,696,5003,865,4001.9207,831,100207,485,600200,777,016
Consolidation - Ontario Energy Board47,575,100(1,153,100)(2.4)48,728,20046,316,90040,949,469
Consolidation - Fair Hydro Trust1,000--1,0001,000(63,711,400)
Consolidation - General Real Estate Portfolio36,0,600--360,600(572,400)-
Total Including Consolidation & Adjustments6,575,210,314(245,305,278)(3.6)6,820,515,5926,895,452,0146,649,104,330
Operating AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2902-03 Energy Development and Management270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Total Operating Assets to be Voted270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Ministry Total Operating Assets270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Capital ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2902-04 Energy Development and Management1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Expense to be Voted1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Statutory Appropriations1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Ministry Total Capital Expense2,000N/AN/A2,0002,000N/A
Consolidation - Independent Electricity System Operator24,643,000571,5002.424,071,50021,896,22123,603,138
Consolidation - Ontario Energy Board1,412,300184,30015.01,228,0001,145,800915,000
Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments26,057,300755,8003.025,301,50023,044,02124,518,138
Capital AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2902-05 Energy Development and Management1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Assets to be Voted1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Ministry Total Capital Assets1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets)6,601,267,614(244,549,478)(3.6)6,845,817,0926,918,496,0356,673,622,468
Historic Trend Analysis Data
ItemActuals 2019-20*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Estimates 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Estimates 2022-23 ($)
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets)416,371,3646,673,622,4686,845,817,0926,601,267,614
N/AN/A1503%3%-4%

For additional financial information, see:

Agencies, Boards and Commissions (ABCs)
ItemEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO)N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Operating Expense211,696,5003,865,4001.9207,831,100207,485,600200,777,016
Capital Expense24,643,000571,5002.424,071,50021,896,22123,603,138
Total IESO Consolidation Adjustments236,339,5004,436,9001.9231,902,600229,381,821224,380,154
Ontario Energy Board (OEB)N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Operating Expense47,575,100(1,153,100)(2.4)48,728,20046,316,90040,949,469
Capital Expense1,412,300184,30015.01,228,8001,145,800915,000
Total OEB Consolidation Adjustments48,987,400(968,800)(1.9)49,956,20047,462,70041,864,469
Other AdjustmentsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Operating Expense Adjustment - Fair Hydro Trust (FHT)1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000(63,711,400)
Operating Expense Adjustment - General Real Estate Portfolio (GREP)360,600N/AN/A360,600(572,400)N/A
Total Other Adjustments361,600N/AN/A361,600(571,400)(63,711,400)

Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO)

The IESO manages real-time operations of Ontario’s power grid system by balancing supply of and demand for electricity, designing and procuring delivery of conservation and demand management programs, planning for the province’s future energy needs, and designing a more efficient electricity marketplace to support sector evolution. The IESO's mandate is embodied in the Electricity Act, 1998.

The IESO's expenses are consolidated onto the ministry’s financial accounts. Its annual operating costs are recovered from annual fees set by the OEB for domestic and export market participants.

COVID-19 Response:

Ontario’s electricity system remains stable and reliable, and the IESO is well equipped to manage changing grid conditions. In order to ensure the provincial power system continues to operate reliably and safely, the IESO continues to actively assess the impact of COVID-19 as it works through the system and as electricity demand responds. Ongoing efforts include closely monitoring demand, revising forecasts and responding to changing system needs.

Ontario Energy Board (OEB)

The OEB is an independent economic regulator of the province’s electricity and natural gas sectors. It oversees Ontario’s energy utilities to ensure the public interest is served.

The OEB's mandate and powers in relation to the energy sector are set out primarily in three statutes – the Ontario Energy Board Act, 1998; the Electricity Act, 1998 and the Energy Consumer Protection Act, 2010, and the regulations made under these statutes. Other statutes, such as the Statutory Powers and Procedure Act, 1990, also inform the OEB's authority.

Modernizing the OEB is a key commitment made by the government under Bill 87, the Fixing the Hydro Mess Act, 2019. In October 2020, the government reformed the OEB's governance structure with the appointment of a new Board Chair and Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer, and a Chief Commissioner. There were also several newly appointed Commissioners to execute the OEB's adjudicative functions. The OEB Modernization initiative included a two-year transition period, which concludes in fall 2022. The new governance structure is in place and the organization has advanced many key policy initiatives.

The OEB's annual operating expenses are consolidated onto the ministry’s financial records. Its operations and activities are fully funded by its regulated stakeholders in the gas and electricity sectors, under the cost-assessment authority in Ontario Regulation 16/08 (Assessment of Expenses and Expenditures) of the Ontario Energy Board Act, 1998.

COVID-19 response:

The OEB has allowed for the creation of deferral accounts to track the costs and losses that energy sector entities are experiencing as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

To support its stakeholders during the pandemic the OEB pivoted to a completely virtual format for technical conferences, settlement conferences, and oral hearings. Furthermore, in June 2020 the OEB moved to an entirely electronic record for all its regulatory proceedings, permanently eliminating its previous requirement of submitting hard copies of all documents submitted in a proceeding.

Ministry organization chart

  • Minister of Energy
    • Deputy Minister Energy
      • Communications Service Branch
      • IT Services
      • Legal Services
      • Energy Supply Policy Division
        • Electricity Policy, Economics & System Planning Branch
        • Fuels Policy & Liaison Branch
        • Nuclear Supply Branch
      • Strategic, Network & Agency Policy Division
        • Distribution & Consumer Assistance Policy Branch
        • Energy Networks & Indigenous Policy Branch
        • LDC Outreach & Network Branch
        • Governance, Strategy & Analytics Branch
      • Conservation & Renewable Energy Division
        • Conservation & Energy Efficiency Branch
        • Conservation Programs & Partnerships Branch
        • Renewables Integration & Distributed Energy Resources Branch
      • Corporate Management Division*footnote 2
        • Corporate Services
        • Controllership Office & Service Management
        • Human Resources Business Branch

2021-22 Annual report

1. COVID-19 response: supporting people and businesses with energy costs

Pricing changes for regulated price plan customers

Emergency pricing relief for Regulated Price Plan (RPP) consumers has been put in place on three occasions to respond to various public health measures put in place during the COVID-19 outbreak, providing rate relief to eligible residential, farm, and small business consumers while they were asked to stay home or change how they operated their business.

  • From March 24 to May 31, 2020, the government applied the off-peak electricity rate for consumers on Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing for all hours of each day.
  • From January 1 to February 22, 2021, the government applied the off-peak electricity rate for all RPP consumers (TOU and tiered) for all hours of each day. 
  • On January 18, 2022, ENERGY announced that in response to modified Step Two public health measures, the off-peak TOU rate would be implemented for all RPP consumers (including those paying tiered rates) from January 18 to February 7, 2022. This rate change was enabled through amendments to O. Reg. 95/05: Classes of Consumers and Determination of Rates.

The key metric of success for all instances was that relief was effectively and efficiently delivered by LDCs and unit sub-metering providers (USMPs) to most (i.e., all eligible) of the province’s more than 5 million residential, small business, and farm consumers. The pricing change was transparently and automatically applied (i.e., on the bill, no application) to all eligible RPP consumers effective on the start date of each off-peak TOU instance, or retroactively on customer bills where it was not operationally feasible for LDCs to apply the pricing change proactively. A typical residential consumer paying TOU prices would expect to see a bill reduction of approximately 13% for the days that this rate was most recently in place in January/February 2022. Individual customer benefits depend on their total consumption, consumption behaviours, and service territory.

2022 RPP Off-Peak Initiative
Estimated bill savings over 21 days
(January 18-February 7)
CustomerSavingsas %Notes
Residential TOU$10.6313%700 kWh Customer
Residential Tiered$7.9010%700 kWh Customer
Small Business TOU$149.1215%10,000 kWh Customer
Small Business Tiered$220.8621%10,000 kWh Customer

The government and its agencies are tracking the impacts of the outbreak on electricity and natural gas consumers and will continue to evaluate the need to stabilize or reduce costs for all consumers.

Global Adjustment deferral

In Spring 2020, through a combination of emergency orders and regulatory amendments, the government deferred Global Adjustment (GA) costs for Class A and non-RPP Class B consumers. This action provided stability in prices during the earlier part of the COVID-19 outbreak when electricity consumption was lower. These costs were recovered in full throughout 2021 from the same consumer classes that benefitted from the deferral.

COVID-19 Energy Assistance Program

The COVID-19 Energy Assistance Program (CEAP) was announced by the Province on June 1, 2020 and launched on July 13, 2020. The Small Business stream launched on August 31, 2020. In March 2021, the program was extended into fiscal year 2021-22 as the ongoing pandemic created a continuing need for this type of assistance. In FY 21-22 CEAP offered $17 million of assistance to residential and small business consumers who had overdue amounts on their electricity and/or natural gas owing due to bills incurred since March 17, 2020. 

  • Eligible consumers could receive an on-bill credit of up to $750 for residential customers, and up to $1,500 for small businesses and registered charities, on each of their electricity and/or natural gas bills.

Keeping Ontario safe and open: Energy Cost Rebate Grant (ECRG)

On November 6, 2020, the temporary property tax and energy cost rebate program was announced to support the government’s Keeping Ontario Safe and Open Framework.

The grant identified new funding for businesses required to close or significantly restrict services in areas subject to modified Stage 2 public health restrictions, or, in areas categorized as Control, Lockdown or Provide-wide Shutdown.

The rebates covered the length of time that a business was required to temporarily close or significantly restrict services as a result of COVID-19 restrictions. Applications for the program closed June 30, 2021, with the grant assisted in over 27,250 unique businesses assisted with their energy costs.

ENERGY Ontario Business Costs Rebate Program (OBCRP)

The OBCRP was announced on December 22, 2021, to provide support for property tax and energy costs to businesses that were most impacted by public health measures in response to the Omicron variant of COVID-19

The program supported eligible businesses that were required to close or reduce capacity to 50% or lower (including a requirement to temporarily close). The rebate amount was provided at 50 per cent or 100 per cent of these costs depending on the degree to which the business was subject to public health restrictions.

Applications for the program closed on March 14, 2022, and over 16,200 unique businesses received energy financial support through the grant.

2. Supporting Ontario families and businesses looking to make upgrades to lower electricity and natural gas costs

In 2019, ENERGY terminated the 2015-2020 electricity conservation and demand management (CDM) Framework and initiated a transition to an interim, scaled-down and centralized program framework. These frameworks are forecasted to exceed their 8.7 TWh target while achieving a savings of up to $442 million from the 2015-2020 Framework.

To offset construction/supply chain disruptions caused by COVID-19 and reduce financial burden to businesses, in July 2020, ENERGY enabled a six-month extension to June 30, 2021 to project deadlines for commercial, institutional and industrial customers with outstanding contracts under the 2015-20 CDM Framework.

On September 30, 2020, an Order in Council and Minister’s Directive was issued to the IESO to launch a new, four-year electricity conservation and demand management (CDM) Framework focused on cost-effectively meeting electricity system and customer needs. IESO successfully launched the Framework on January 1, 2021, which also includes a new streamlined Energy Affordability Program (EAP) for households struggling to pay their electricity bills. EAP provides free electricity saving measures to help participating households manage their electricity-use and lower their electricity costs by up to $1,000 per year.

On April 4, 2021, the Minister of Energy asked the IESO to report back by July 29, 2022, with options for additional or expanded CDM programs to address urgent system needs as identified in the 2022 Annual Acquisition Report (AAR) as well as to respond to needs of the growing greenhouse sector.

On May 3, 2021, Enbridge Gas submitted its 2022–2027 DSM plan to the OEB. Enbridge Gas had taken direction from the OEB on having modest budget increases to balance short-term bill impacts with long-term savings opportunities for ratepayers. Considering the need to fully review the Enbridge Gas multi-year DSM proposal, the OEB extended the currently approved 2021 DSM budget of $132,106,917 for the duration of 2022. The budget includes programming for residential, affordable housing, commercial, and industrial market sectors. The multi-year DSM term from 2023–2027 will be subject to a full review.

3. Ensuring there is a reliable source of energy for all Ontarians

Upcoming procurements to meet system needs

The IESO is responsible for planning for the province’s future energy needs, while paying close attention to how the sector is evolving. However, ENERGY is responsible for providing the policy oversight for supply procurement and planning. 

According to the IESO, Ontario is forecasted to have an emerging supply need in 2025-26, that grows through the latter part of the decade. This is a result of the upcoming closure of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, refurbishment schedules of other nuclear facilities, expanding electrification and increasing business investment in the province. In order to fill this forecasted supply requirement, the IESO will need to procure electricity products and services from existing and new resources. On January 27, 2022, a directive to the IESO was issued to design and undertake multiple procurement mechanisms to meet the supply gap forecasted by the IESO. These include procuring existing resources through the first Medium-Term Request for Proposals (MT RFP 1) and future MT RFPs, re-contracting Calstock Generating Station, contracting the Oneida Energy Storage Project, designing the first Long Term RFP (LT RFP) to procure new build resources, designing a program for existing small hydroelectric facilities, and assessing the suitability of a program for existing larger hydroelectric facilities. On March 31, 2022, the IESO published the 2022 Annual Acquisition Report (AAR), which showed that capacity needs in the years up to and including 2024 are expected to be met through acquisition plans already underway through the January 27 directive. However, additional needs are expected to emerge as early as 2025, which would require additional actions.

The additional needs are due to a combination of higher than forecasted electricity demand and the IESO's updated estimate of capacity contributions from existing procurement plans being lower than previously forecasted.

Nuclear refurbishments and Pickering operation to 2025

The Ministry provides policy oversight of Ontario’s nuclear refurbishments. Ontario is progressing with refurbishment of four nuclear units at Darlington Nuclear Generating Station and six at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station over the next 12 years. The refurbishments will secure a long-term supply of reliable and cost-effective baseload power for decades to come.

In June 2020, OPG successfully completed the first Darlington refurbishment (i.e., Unit 2) on budget in the midst of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. In September 2020, OPG commenced the second Darlington refurbishment (i.e., Unit 3) after putting in place mitigation measures for the pandemic. Darlington Unit 3 refurbishment is progressing within budget and schedule, and work is currently underway on the replacement of key reactor components. In February 2022, OPG commenced the third Darlington refurbishment (i.e., Unit 1), marking the first time that two Darlington units are undergoing refurbishment at the same time. The final Darlington unit (i.e., Unit 4) is expected to commence refurbishment in September 2023. Overall, the four-unit project is on track to be complete on time and on budget.

The IESO continues to oversee implementation of the Bruce refurbishment agreement, including ongoing investments in the life extension of the Bruce nuclear units. Bruce Unit 6 refurbishment commenced in January 2020. Due to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, Bruce Power temporarily reduced refurbishment outage work and put in place measures to address COVID-19. Full refurbishment work has now resumed, and Unit 6 remains on track to be complete within budget and schedule despite the challenges of the pandemic. The second Bruce unit refurbishment (i.e., Unit 3) is expected to commence in February 2023.

Pickering is currently authorized to operate until 2024 by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). OPG is planning to further optimize the shutdown schedule for Pickering beyond 2024, subject to regulatory approval from the CNSC. Continued operation of Pickering during the mid-2020s would help meet electricity system needs and provide clean and reliable power during the Darlington and initial Bruce refurbishments. It will also sustain thousands of jobs in Durham region for longer and allow OPG to better manage the transition to the end of Pickering commercial operations.

Small Modular Reactors (SMRs)

The Ministry is responsible for developing and implementing Ontario’s SMR policies, programs and initiatives. As the representative of OPG's sole shareholder (i.e., Ontario government), the Ministry is also responsible for providing policy oversight of OPG's Darlington SMR Project.

In December 2019, Ontario signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Saskatchewan and New Brunswick, committing to collaborate on the development and deployment of SMRs. In April 2021, the three provinces released a Feasibility Study and business case for SMRs and welcomed Alberta as the latest signatory to the SMR MOU. In March 2022, Ontario along with its SMR MOU partner provinces released a Strategic Plan to build on the Feasibility Study and outline the path forward on SMRs. The Strategic Plan highlights how SMRs can provide safe, reliable and zero-emissions energy while creating new economic opportunities. The report identifies five key priority areas for SMR development and deployment.

In December 2021, following government approval, OPG announced the selection of GE Hitachi’s BWRX-300 SMR technology for the Darlington SMR project. OPG is currently proceeding with detailed planning and preparation work with GE Hitachi (e.g., undertaking site preparation work, obtaining a construction licence from the CNSC) in order to deploy the first Darlington SMR by 2028.

Facilitating natural gas expansion

In January 2021, the Ministry posted a regulatory proposal on the Environmental Registry of Ontario to increase the cost threshold for hydrocarbon pipelines that require Ontario Energy Board; (OEB) approval through its Leave-to-Construct process from $2 million to $10 million. This proposal would support Ontario’s commitment to regulatory burden reduction and providing a reliable and cost-effective energy supply.

Support for Enbridge Line 5

Enbridge Line 5 is a light crude oil and natural gas liquids (NGLs) pipeline with a capacity of 540,000 barrels per day and is a critical piece of energy infrastructure for Ontario’s refining and petrochemical sectors.

In November 2020, Michigan’s Governor took legal action in state court to shut down Line 5 under the Straits of Mackinac by revoking an easement granted in 1953, effective in May 2021. In November 2021, Governor Whitmer voluntarily dismissed her suit against Enbridge that was ordered to stay in federal court.

In June 2019, Michigan’s Attorney General filed a separate lawsuit in Michigan state court against Enbridge to shut down Line 5. The lawsuit was held in abeyance while other lawsuits between Michigan and Enbridge were reviewed. As of December 2021, the lawsuit has been reactivated. Legal proceedings are ongoing.

In October 2021, the Government of Canada invoked a 1977 Treaty with the United States on Transit Pipelines to dispute Michigan’s efforts to shut down Line 5. Negotiations under the Treaty are ongoing.

Ontario’s low-carbon hydrogen strategy

November 2020, the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) launched a consultation process to develop the province’s first-ever low carbon hydrogen strategy. MECP conducted extensive consultations throughout 2021-22 with industry, academia, environmental groups, Indigenous communities and the public. The Ministry of Energy was tasked with preparing the strategy for release.

Northern transmission expansion

ENERGY supports the Wataynikaneyap Power Project to connect 16 remote First Nation communities to the provincial electricity grid and ending their reliance on costly and unsustainable diesel generation.

Ontario is in the process of reinforcing and expanding its transmission network in the northern region of the province to ensure businesses and residents, including remote First Nation communities, have access to a reliable power supply. The East-West Tie project was recently completed and added 450 km of new line between Thunder Bay and Wawa; and the Wataynikaneyap Power Project which is currently under construction will add 1800 km of new line from Dinorwec to Pickle Lake and further north to connect 16 First Nation communities to the grid.

ENERGY is responsible for Ontario’s construction loan of up to $1.34B to Wataynikaneyap that is part of a negotiated funding framework with the Federal Government. Working with the Ontario Financing Authority as a loan administrative agent, ENERGY issues advance requests to fund the project and works to protect the provincial interest under the funding agreements. 

As of May 2022, the Wataynikaneyap Project has made substantial construction progress. This includes the clearing of 1,348 km of transmission corridor, installation of 2,089 transmission stower and 587 km of transmission line has been strung. Community connections are scheduled to occur through 2022 and 4, with the energization of the Line to Pickle Lake and connection of two First Nation Communities occurring in the summer and fall of 2022-2023. Wataynikaneyap Project is transformational because it is majority-owned by a partnership of 22 First Nations who have the goal of 100% First Nation ownership as the project builds revenues over time.

NextBridge announced the completion of the East West Tie in April 2022. This project has been a priority to Ontario as it is required to provide reliable and adequate supply of electricity to northern Ontario to support economic growth. The East West Tie is also an example of a successful transmission project that partnered with local Indigenous communities to partially own and assist in the construction of the line.

4. Providing support for Ontario's job creators

Electricity price mitigation for industrial and commercial consumers

During the government’s 2019 industrial electricity pricing consultation, businesses highlighted that the cost of electricity was impacting their competitiveness. As a result, the government took action to support businesses through the COVID-19 pandemic and into recovery.

Effective January 1, 2021, the government is funding a portion of Global Adjustment (GA) associated with the cost of non-hydro renewable energy contracts (i.e., wind, solar and bioenergy), reducing costs for all electricity consumers. This measure helps provide for people and businesses and keep Ontario open for business by making electricity prices more competitive. In 2022, industrial consumers could see savings of about 15% on their bills, while mid-sized commercial consumers could see savings of about 17% on their bills. Actual savings depend on location and consumption.

In addition, the government approved changes to the Industrial Conservation Initiative (ICI) that took effect May 1, 2022, to enhance fairness and improve transparency in billing for participants. The changes are aimed at addressing concerns raised by stakeholders during the 2019 industrial pricing consultation specific to the challenges of identifying and responding to peak demand events, as well as reducing regulatory burden. The changes include:

  • Using real-time Ontario demand as the basis for determining the five peak hours under ICI to improve cost visibility for ICI participants;
  • Updating the ICI eligibility provision related to Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) programs to ensure consumers in CDM programs can continue to participate in ICI; and 
  • Allowing the IESO or local distribution companies to administer transfers of ownership of ICI facilities for their customers, to streamline the transfer process.

5. Continuing efforts to bring accountability to the energy sector

Building off profound efforts to improve transparency and accountability to the energy sector, the Ministry continues to administer the single, transparent on-bill rebate known as the Ontario Electricity Rebate (OER). Electricity bills clearly display the rebate provided under OER for residential consumers, farms and small businesses. The percentage of the OER has been adjusted over time as electricity costs change in order to manage the trajectory of the average residential bill.

6. Strengthening trust in the OEB

Through Bill 87, the Fixing the Hydro Mess Act, 2019, the government reformed the OEB's governance structure, modernizing the OEB to become a best-in-class energy regulator. In October 2020, new leadership was appointed to the OEB. This included appointment of a new Board of Directors responsible for governance and management oversight, a Chief Executive Officer to provide leadership for operations and policy, and a Chief Commissioner responsible for the adjudicative function of the OEB.

In December 2021, further amendments to the Ontario Energy Board Act, 1998 gave the OEB additional tools to ensure it could attract and retain the highly qualified Commissioners who carry out the OEB's adjudicative function.

OEB modernization is enhancing the performance of energy sector; increasing transparency, accountability, and confidence in the OEB; and facilitating innovation. Since the new leadership took office, the OEB has begun making improvements in multiple areas of operations including regulatory processes, stakeholder engagement approaches and performance standards, to the benefit of Ontario ratepayers.

7. Empowering Ontarians to reduce their energy bills

Green Button

On August 26, 2021, the government passed a new Green Button regulation that will give Ontario families and businesses more control over their electricity and natural gas bills. The Green Button standard will allow energy consumers to track their energy use, reduce bills and save money. Studies have found that easy access to energy data, which Green Button can help provide, can help consumers make informed decisions and achieve energy savings. Ontario is the first jurisdiction in Canada to mandate the standard.

Under the Green Button regulation, all regulated Ontario electricity and natural gas utilities are required to provide Green Button to their customers by November 1, 2023. This builds on progress made by London Hydro and Festival Hydro, which voluntarily offered Green Button to their customers, giving the families and businesses in their regions the first opportunity to find additional bill savings. Since passage of the regulation, two utilities in Ontario – Essex Power and Westario Power – have already announced Green Button solutions for their customers.

Green Button lets customers download their natural gas and hourly electricity data in a standardized format from their utility and authorize the secure transfer of this data to applications of their choice. This real time data can then be accessed on their smartphone or computer. These apps can also analyze the energy data and provide customers with helpful energy-saving tips to reduce their energy bills and personalized retrofit options to achieve long-lasting savings.

Ontario’s energy reporting regulations for broader public sector organizations and the owners of large buildings gives them the tools and data they need to understand the energy usage patterns of their buildings. Building owners can use this information to manage their usage and costs and identify opportunities to improve building energy performance.

The energy use information submitted by those organizations and businesses is posted on Ontario’s Data Catalogue. Making information publicly available demonstrates government leadership in energy conservation and enables private sector market actors to make smarter investments (e.g., building upgrades, buying, selling and leasing).

Through its Municipal Energy Plan program Ontario provides municipalities with funding to map how energy is used across their community. This information helps municipalities integrate energy use with land use planning, economic development and climate change action plans. To date Ontario has approved 39 applications for funding, representing 58 municipalities across Ontario.

Community Net Metering (CNM)

Ontario’s Net Metering and Community Net Metering (CNM) regulations provide opportunities for consumers to save on their electricity bills and achieve their sustainability goals. The net metering regulation (O. Reg. 541/05: Net Metering) requires local distribution companies (LDCs) to offer net metering to eligible customers. A customer who is billed on a net-metered basis can lower their electricity bill by can generating electricity for their own use using a renewable generation system to offset their consumption from the grid, and they can also receive a credit on their electricity bill for electricity they send to the grid when they are generating more than what they need at any given time.

On September 28, 2021, the government introduced a new regulation (O. Reg. 679/21: Community Net Metering Projects) authorizing the demonstration of CNM, which is a model that would allow communities to work together to generate renewable energy and lower their electricity bills. The regulation provides a framework for arrangements involving a central customer who manages and operates several load facilities, renewable generation facilities and any energy storage facilities participating in a CNM demonstration project. At this time, there is only one authorized demonstration project, the West Five development in London, Ontario. Learnings from the demonstration project will inform government policy and regulatory design, should the model be considered for broader implementation in the future.

White Pines decommissioning

The White Pines Wind Project Termination Act, 2018 requires the decommissioning of the White Pines Wind Project and, to ensure a safe and complete decommissioning of the project. The Ministry worked with the developer, wpd White Pines Wind Incorporated (wpd) and with the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) to ensure the project was decommissioned in accordance with MECP's Closure of the White Pines Wind Facility regulation (O. Reg. 237/19) and that the project site was maintained in a clean and safe condition throughout this process. Decommissioning of the project was completed in December 2019. All components of the windfarm (including access roads and turbine foundations) have been removed as directed by the landowners. The site is now in a 12-month period of environmental monitoring under the direction of MECP.

Table 3: Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures 2021-22
ItemMinistry Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2021-22 *footnote 3
COVID-19 Approvals290.8
Other Operating6,600.9
Other Capital23.0
Staff Strength **footnote 4 (as of March 31, 2022)191.25

Part II: Detailed financials 2022-23

A. Ministry summary information

The Ministry of Energy is responsible for setting the legislative and policy framework to provide Ontarians with an affordable supply of energy and more choices in their energy use. The Ministry develops and advises on all aspects of energy policy for Ontario, including electricity, natural gas and oil. It oversees the Ontario Energy Board and the Independent Electricity System Operator. The Ministry also represents the shareholder in dealings with Ontario Power Generation and represents the Province as a shareholder of Hydro One, managing its investment in and the governance relationship with this publicly traded company. The Ministry is also responsible for updating and developing policy related to long-term energy planning. The Ministry is also responsible for fulfilling the Crown’s Duty to Consult on energy projects and policies. The Ministry of Energy works with many partners inside and outside government to promote energy conservation, develop the electricity generation, transmission, distribution and other energy-related facilities that help power our economy, and ensure that Ontario remains one of the best places in the world in which to live, work, invest and raise a family.

Table A1: Operating and Capital Summary by Vote
Votes/ProgramsEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Operating ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2901-01 Ministry Administration12,983,40022,4000.212,961,00012,090,60012,567,636
2902-01 Energy Development and Management28,877,100(30,486,600)(51.4)59,363,700313,458,200919,781,349
2905-01 Electricity Price Migration6,273,650,600(217,531,000)(3.4)6,491,181,6006,316,583,7005,538,561,914
Total Operating Expense to be Voted6,315,511,100(247,995,200)(3.8)6,563,506,3006,642,132,5006,471,000,899
Statutory Appropriations66,014(22,378)(25.3)88,39288,41488,346
Ministry Total Operating Expense6,315,577,114(248,017,578)(3.8)6,563,594,6926,642,220,9146,471,089,245
Consolidation - Independent Electricity System Operator211,696,5003,865,4001.9207,831,100207,485,600200,777,016
Consolidation - Ontario Energy Board47,575,100(1,153,100)(2.4)48,728,20046,316,90040,949,469
Consolidation - Fair Hydro Trust1,000--1,0001,000(63,711,400)
Consolidation - General Real Estate Portfolio36,0,600--360,600(572,400)-
Total Including Consolidation & Adjustments6,575,210,314(245,305,278)(3.6)6,820,515,5926,895,452,0146,649,104,330
Operating AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2902-03 Energy Development and Management270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Total Operating Assets to be Voted270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Ministry Total Operating Assets270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Capital ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2902-04 Energy Development and Management1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Expense to be Voted1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Statutory Appropriations1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Ministry Total Capital Expense2,000N/AN/A2,0002,000N/A
Consolidation - Independent Electricity System Operator24,643,000571,5002.424,071,50021,896,22123,603,138
Consolidation - Ontario Energy Board1,412,300184,30015.01,228,0001,145,800915,000
Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments26,057,300755,8003.025,301,50023,044,02124,518,138
Capital AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
2902-05 Energy Development and Management1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Assets to be Voted1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Ministry Total Capital Assets1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets)6,601,267,614(244,549,478)(3.6)6,845,817,0926,918,496,0356,673,622,468
Historic Trend Analysis Data
ItemActuals 2019-20*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Estimates 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Estimates 2020-21 ($)
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets)416,371,3646,673,622,4686,845,817,0926,601,267,614
N/AN/A1503%3%-4%
Table A2: Operating Summary by Vote and Standard Account
Standard Account*footnote 4Vote 2901 Ministry Administration ($)Vote 2902 Energy Development and Management ($)Vote 2905 Electricity Price Mitigation ($)Total Ministry ($)Total Ministry (%**footnote 5)
Operating ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Salaries and Wages7,258,50014,871,300N/A22,129,8000.4
Employee Benefits824,1001,683,000N/A2,507,1000.0
Transportation and Communications312,700385,000N/A697,7000.0
Services5,069,6004,659,800N/A9,729,4000.2
Supplies and Equipment343,600312,600N/A656,2000.0
Transfer PaymentsN/A6,965,4006,273,650,6006,280,616,00099.4
Other TransactionsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Less: Recoveries825,100N/AN/A825,1000.0
Total12,983,40028,877,1006,273,650,6006,315,511,100100.0
Percent of Total Ministry0.20.599.3100.0100.0
Operating AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Deposits and Prepaid ExpensesN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Advances and Recoverable AmountsN/A1,000N/A1,0000.0
Loans and InvestmentsN/A270,750,000N/A270,750,000100.0
Inventory Held for ResaleN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Less: RecoveriesN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
TotalN/A270,751,000N/A270,751,000100.0
Percent of Total MinistryN/A100.0N/A100.0N/A
Image
A graphic in form of a pie chart, data representing Operating Summary by Vote in three categories; Ministry Administration, Energy Development and Management, and Electricity Price Migration.
Operating Summary by Vote
Vote/ItemAmount
Vote 2901 - Ministry Administration12,983,400
Vote 2902 - Energy Development and Management299,628,100
Vote 2905 - Electricity Price Mitigation6,273,650,600
Image
A graphic in form of a pie chart, data representing Operating Summary by Standard Account in four categories; Operating Asset, Payroll, Other Direct Operating Expense and Transfer Payments.
Operating Summary by Standard Account
Standard AccountAmount
Payroll24,636,900
ODOE11,908,400
Transfer Payments6,280,616,000
Operating Asset270,751,000
Table A3: Capital Summary by Vote and Standard Account
Standard Account*footnote 4Vote 2901 Ministry Administration ($)Vote 2902 Energy Development and Management ($)Vote 2905 Electricity Price Mitigation ($)Total Ministry ($)Total Ministry (%**footnote 5)
Capital ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Salaries and WagesN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Employee BenefitsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Transportation and CommunicationsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
ServicesN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Supplies and EquipmentN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Transfer PaymentsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Other TransactionsN/A2,000N/A2,000100.00
Less: RecoveriesN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
TotalN/A2,000N/A2,000100.0
Percent of Total MinistryN/A100.0N/A100.0100.0
Capital AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
LandN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
BuildingsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Transportation InfrastructureN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Dams and engineering structuresN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Machinery and EquipmentN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Information Technology HardwareN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Business Application SoftwareN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Land and Marine FleetN/A1,000N/A1,0000.0
AircraftN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Less: RecoveriesN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
TotalN/A1,000N/A1,000N/A
Percent of Total MinistryN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Table A4: Reconciliation to Previously Published Data
Operating ExpenseEstimates 2021-22 ($)Actual 2020-21 ($)
Total Operating Expense Previously Published *footnote 6N/AN/A
Government Reorganization:N/AN/A
Transfer of functions from other Ministries6,563,594,6926,471,089,245
Restated Total Operating Expense6,563,594,6926,471,089,245
Operating AssetsEstimates 2021-22 ($)Actual 2020-21 ($)
Total Operating Expense Previously Published*footnote 6N/AN/A
Government Reorganization:N/AN/A
Transfer of functions from other Ministries507,000,000234,800,000
Restated Total Operating Expense507,000,000234,800,000
Capital ExpenseEstimates 2021-22 ($)Actual 2020-21 ($)
Total Capital Expense Previously Published*footnote 6N/AN/A
Change in AccountingN/AN/A
Transfer of functions from other Ministries2,000N/A
Restated Total Capital Expense2,000N/A
Capital AssetsEstimates 2021-22 ($)Actual 2020-21 ($)
Total Capital Expense Previously Published*footnote 6N/AN/A
Government Reorganization:N/AN/A
Transfer of functions from other Ministries1,000N/A
Restated Total Capital Assets1,000N/A

B. Vote summary information

Ministry administration program - Vote 2901

This program works to achieve ministry and government objectives by providing executive direction, strategic advice and vital corporate services, including communications, strategic human resources, accessibility, French Language Services, information technology and business solutions, legal services, Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy activities, information and records management, accommodations and facilities management, emergency management, continuity of operations planning, procurement, controllership and accounting, and strategic and resource planning and allocation activities.

Energy development and management - Vote 2902

This program is responsible for developing Ontario's energy policy framework, which is central to the building of a strong and prosperous economy. It provides leadership and support to the energy sector to ensure clean, reliable, affordable and sustainable energy supply, transmission and distribution systems. The program supports energy conservation and efficiency, grid modernization, and the development of cleaner forms of energy. This program also oversees engagement and consultation with First Nations and Métis on provincial energy sector activities and projects while facilitating the participation of Indigenous communities in the energy sector. The program is also responsible for overseeing a construction loan for the Watay Transmission Project.

Electricity price migration - Vote 2905

This program helps Ontarians manage electricity costs.

Vote 2901 - Ministry Administration Program
Table B1: Operating
Votes/ProgramsEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Operating expenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
1 Ministry Administration12,983,40022,4000.212,961,00012,090,60012,567,636
Total Operating Expense to be Voted12,983,40022,4000.212,961,00012,090,60012,567,636
Minister's Salary, the Executive Council Act47,841N/AN/A47,84147,84149,301
Minister without Portfolio's Salary, the Executive Council ActN/A(22,378)(100.0)22,378N/A22,378
Parliamentary Assistant's Salary, the Executive Council Act16,173N/AN/A16,17316,17316,667
Bad Debt Expense, the Financial Administration Act1,000N/AN/A1,000N/AN/A
Total Statutory Appropriations65,014(22,378)(25.6)87,39264,01488,346
Total Operating Expense13,048,414220.013,048,39212,154,61412,655,982
Operating assetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total Operating Assets to be VotedN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total Statutory AppropriationsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total Operating AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Vote 2902 - Energy Development and Management
Table B2: Operating
Votes/ProgramsEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Operating expenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
1 Policy and Programs28,877,100(30,486,600)(51.4)59,363,700313,458,200919,781,349
Total Operating Expense to be Voted28,877,100(30,486,600)(51.4)59,363,700313,458,200919,781,349
Bad Debt Expense, the Financial Administration Act1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Statutory Appropriations1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Operating Expense28,878,100(30,486,600)(51.4)59,364,700313,459,200919,781,349
Operating assetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
3 Energy Development and Management270,751,000-236,249,000-47507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Total Operating Assets to be Voted270,751,000-236,249,000-47507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Total Statutory AppropriationsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total Operating Assets270,751,000-236,249,000-47507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Vote 2902 - Energy Development and Management
Table B3: Capital
Votes/ProgramsEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Capital expenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
4 Energy Development and Management - Expense related to Capital Assets1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Expense to be Voted1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Amortization Expense, the Financial Administration Act1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Statutory Appropriations1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Operating Expense2,000N/AN/A2,0002,000N/A
Capital AssetsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
5 Energy Development and Management1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Assets to be Voted1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Total Capital Assets1,000N/AN/A1,0001,000N/A
Vote 2905 - Electricity Price Mitigation
Table B4: Operating
Votes/ProgramsEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Operating ExpenseN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
1 Electricity Price Mitigation Programs6,273,650,600(217,531,000)(3.4)6,491,181,6006,316,583,7005,538,651,914
Total Operating Expense to be Voted6,273,650,600(217,531,000)(3.4)6,491,181,6006,316,583,7005,538,651,914
Total Operating Expense6,273,650,600(217,531,000)(3.4)6,491,181,6006,316,583,7005,538,651,914

C. Item/sub-item summary information

Vote/Item: 2901 - 01
Vote: Ministry Administration
Item: Ministry Administration
Type: Operating Expense

Item/sub-item description

Regular business

This program works to achieve ministry and government objectives by providing executive direction, strategic advice and vital corporate services, including communications, strategic human resources, accessibility, French Language Services, information technology and business solutions, legal services, Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy activities, information and records management, accommodations and facilities management, emergency management, continuity of operations planning, procurement, controllership and accounting, and strategic and resource planning and allocation activities.

Table C1: Comparative details - operating expense

Vote/Item: 2901 - 01
Vote: Ministry Administration
Item: Ministry Administration
Type: Operating Expense

Standard AccountEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Salaries and Wages7,258,50022,4000.37,236,1006,365,7006,414,096
Employee Benefits824,100N/AN/A824,100824,1001,032,055
Transportation and Communication312,700N/AN/A312,700312,70083,790
Services5,069,600N/AN/A5,069,6005,069,6005,012,792
Supplies and Equipment343,600N/AN/A343,600343,60024,903
Other TransactionsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Total12,983,40022,4000.212,961,00012,090,60012,567,636

Explanation for estimates changes from 2021-22

Vote 2901-01 allocation increased by $0.02 million from 2021-22. The main change is due to an inter-ministry transfer for Ministry Without Portfolio Stat. Salary ($0.02 million increase).

Vote/Item: 2902 - 01
Vote: Energy Development and Management
Item: Policy and Programs
Type: Operating Expense

Item/sub-item description

Regular business

Policy and Programs develops the structural, legislative and regulatory approaches necessary for a reliable electricity sector, maintains shareholder relations with Ontario Power Generation and Hydro One, develops mechanisms to protect and provide choices to energy consumers, provides a structured network for distribution sector engagement and oversees the Ontario Energy Board and the Independent Electricity System Operator. It supports the cost-effective deployment of conservation and energy efficiency, and distributed energy technologies, advances initiatives to modernize Ontario’s nuclear fleet, and supports advanced network development while ensuring delivery through a strong, stable transmission and distribution system.

The ministry participates in federal-provincial, and North America-wide forums on electricity reliability which engage with stakeholders, including North American standards organizations, provincial, federal and U.S. energy agencies, local distribution companies, independent generators, large power consumers, environmental groups, consumer groups and other provinces, territories and the federal governments to review supply adequacy and future transmission and distribution needs, future outlook and to facilitate and advance energy supply and conservation initiatives.

Table C2: Comparative details - operating expense

Vote/Item: 2902 - 01
Vote: Energy Development and Management
Item: Policy and Programs
Type: Operating Expense

Standard AccountEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Salaries and Wages14,871,300N/AN/A14,871,30013,120,80012,354,674
Employee Benefits1,683,000N/AN/A1,683,0001,683,0001,803,801
Transportation and Communication385,000N/AN/A385,000385,00072,383
Services4,659,800(4,600)(0.1)4,664,4004,664,4002,004,120
Supplies and Equipment312,600N/AN/A312,600312,6003,484
Transfer PaymentsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Energy Support, Engagement and Indigenous Partnership Programs6,965,4004,518,000184.62,447,400109,292,400813,282,455
COVID-19 Response - Energy Rebate GrantN/A(35,000,000)(100.0)35,000,000184,000,00090,260,432
Transfer Payment CN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Transfer Payment DN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Transfer Payment EN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Other Transactions1,000N/AN/A1,000N/AN/A
Total28,878,100(30,486,600)(51.4)59,364,700313,458,200919,781,349
Explanation for Estimates Changes from 2021-22($M)
Energy Support, Engagement and Indigenous Partnership Programs4.5
COVID-19 - Energy Rebate Grant35.0
N/A30.5

Table C3: Comparative details - operating asset

Vote/Item: 2902 - 03
Vote: Energy Development and Management
Item: Energy Development and Management
Type: Operating Asset

Standard AccountEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Advances and Recoverable Amounts1,0001,000N/AN/AN/AN/A
Loans and Investments270,750,000(236,250,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
N/A270,751,000(236,249,000)(46.6)507,000,000342,800,000234,800,000
Explanation for Estimates Changes from 2021-22($M)
Program Forecast Changes(236,250,000)
N/A(236,250,000)

Table C4: Comparative details - capital expense

Vote/Item: 2902 - 04
Vote: Energy Development and Management
Item: Energy Development and Management - Expense related to Capital Assets
Type: Capital Expense

Standard AccountEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Other Transactions2,000N/AN/A2,000N/AN/A
Total2,000N/AN/A2,000N/AN/A

Table C5: Comparative details - capital asset

Vote/Item: 2902 - 05
Vote: Energy Development and Management
Item: Energy Development and Management
Type: Capital Asset

Standard AccountEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Land and Marine Fleet1,000N/AN/A1,000N/AN/A
Total1,000N/AN/A1,000N/AN/A

Table C6: Comparative details - operating expense

Vote/Item: 2905 - 01
Vote: Electricity Price Mitigation
Item: Electricity Price Mitigation Programs
Type: Operating Expense

Regular business

The Electricity Price Mitigation program helps Ontarians manage electricity costs.

Standard AccountEstimates 2022-23 ($)Change from Estimates 2021-22 ($)%Estimates 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Interim Actuals 2021-22*footnote 1 ($)Actuals 2020-21*footnote 1 ($)
Transfer PaymentsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Electricity Rate MitigationN/AN/AN/AN/A36,959,90020,737,300
Rural or Remote Rate Protection Program248,082,8002,092,9000.9245,989,900244,531,500243,808,881
Ontario Electricity Support Program200,408,200(6,631,000)(3.2)207,039,200179,514,000181,739,742
On-Reserve First Nations Delivery Credit27,996,600(1,956,300)(6.5)29,952,90026,037,60023,495,374
Distribution Rate Protection382,049,70057,080,30017.6324,969,400347,438,600305,897,035
Ontario Electricity Rebate2,169,970,400(298,924,900)(12.1)2,468,895,3002,267,203,1003,960,831,281
Comprehensive Electricity Plan3,150,273,00027,832,8000.93,122,440,2003,122,440,200774,315,000
Fair Hydro Trust Financing Costs64,000,000N/AN/A64,000,00063,683,200N/A
Northern Ontario Energy Credit30,869,9002,975,20010.727,894,70028,775,60027,827,301
Total6,273,650,600(217,531,000)(3.4)6,491,181,6006,316,583,7005,538,651,914
Explanation for Estimates Changes from 2021-22($M)
Funding to existing Northern Ontario biomass electricity facility contracts27.8
Other data-drive forecast updates(245,3)
N/A(217.5)

D. Appendix – Time-limited and Discretionary Transfer Payments

Table D1: Time-Limited Discretionary Transfer Payments
Name of Time-Limited Discretionary Transfer PaymentVote-Item (#)Capital (CE) or Operating Expense (OE)Discretionary Transfer PaymentTime-Limited Transfer PaymentBudget 2022-23 ($)
Energy Support, Engagement and Indigenous Partnership Programs - non-time limited2902-1OEDiscretionary Transfer PaymentN/A2,447,400
Energy Support, Engagement and Indigenous Partnership Programs - Clean Home Heating Pilot2902-1OEDiscretionary Transfer PaymentTime-Limited Transfer Payment4,518,000
N/AN/AN/AN/AN/A6,965,400