Introduction

1.1 Purpose of the certification guide

This certification guide provides information on the requirements to secure and renew a drinking water operator and water quality analyst certificate. The guide provides interpretation of the Certification of Drinking Water System Operators and Water Quality Analysts Regulation, O. Reg. 128/04, made under the Safe Drinking Water Act, 2002.

This guide should not be considered legal advice. In the event of a conflict between this guide and the requirements of the legislation, the legislation shall govern. Owners, operating authorities, operators and water quality analysts should refer to O. Reg. 128/04 and the Safe Drinking Water Act, 2002 for a complete understanding of their legal responsibilities, and certification compliance requirements.

1.2 Certification program administration

The Ontario Drinking Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Program is administered by a third party under contract with the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks. The third party certification program administrator is the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office (OWWCO).

The Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office is responsible for processing certificate and certificate renewal applications, processing exam applications, coordinating and marking exams, notifying operators of the need to renew their certificate, selling exam study guides, informing operators on continuing education courses that meet the necessary criteria and providing information to operators.

Details on how to contact the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office are provided in section 13 of this guide.

All decisions regarding the issuance, suspension or revocation of certificates are made by the Director under O. Reg. 128/04 within the Program Management Branch, Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks.

1.3 Separate wastewater operator licensing program guide

A separate program guide for the licensing of wastewater operators is available on the ministry’s drinking water landing page.

1.4 Tips on reading this guide

The reference to Director throughout the regulation is to a person or persons appointed by the Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks as having the authority to make decisions under O. Reg. 128/04. The Director includes the Manager of Certification and Licensing Programs Office within the Program Management Branch, Environmental Policy Division, Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks.

Key terms used in this guide are bolded within the section in which the term is used. For exact legal definitions of terms, please refer to the relevant regulation and the Safe Drinking Water Act, 2002 (SDWA).

Policies that supplement O. Reg. 128/04 are contained in separate guidelines, and can be obtained from the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office (see sections 13 of this guide for contact information) or on the ministry’s website. However, in some instances, parts of these policies have been included in this guide.

1.5 Program mandate

The Ontario Drinking Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Program establishes occupational standards for operators and water quality analysts. It is also intended to give greater assurance of safe drinking water to the residents of Ontario through ensuring that operators have the education, experience and knowledge to perform their responsibilities effectively.

Systems and subsystems

2.1 System categories governed by O. Reg. 128/04

Section 12 (1) under the SDWA requires that no person shall operate a municipal drinking water system or a regulated non-municipal drinking water system unless the person holds a valid operator’s certificate issued in accordance with the regulations.

The Drinking Water Systems Regulation (O. Reg. 170/03) identifies the regulated non-municipal system categories that require a certified operator. The following five system categories, (please see O. Reg. 170/03 for their definition), require a certified operator and are governed by O. Reg. 128/04:

  • large municipal residential
  • small municipal residential
  • non-municipal year round residential
  • large non-municipal non-residential system serving a designated facility
  • large municipal non-residential system serving a designated facility

For routine operational testing, such as conducting chlorine residual and turbidity tests, all systems, except for large municipal residential systems, may also use a "Supervised Person." For more information on the designation of a "Supervised Person," please review the Steps to become a supervised person page.

2.2 Drinking water system categories

For the purpose of operator certification, O. Reg. 128/04 has categorized two types of systems:

  • municipal residential systems
  • limited systems

2.2.1 Municipal residential systems

Under O. Reg. 128/04 municipal residential systems include the following system categories defined in O. Reg. 170/03:

  • large municipal residential
  • small municipal residential – surface water or GUDI (Groundwater Under Direct Influence of Surface Water) only

Municipal residential systems are divided into three types of subsystems, with each having four classification levels as follows:

  • water distribution and supply subsystem – Classes I to IV
  • water distribution subsystem – Classes I to IV
  • water treatment subsystem – Classes I to IV

A distribution and supply subsystem is a municipal residential drinking water groundwater system that distributes and treats water, where the treatment is limited to disinfection. It does not include a system deemed to have source water under the direct influence of surface water, otherwise referred to as a GUDI system. (See section 2 of O. Reg. 170/03 for description of GUDI).

A distribution and supply subsystem includes groundwater systems:

  • with primary disinfection using chlorination, chloramination, UV or ozonation
  • that include addition of chemicals for stability or corrosion control

A distribution subsystem is a municipal residential subsystem that supplies and distributes water but does not include that part of the drinking water system that collects, produces or treats water.

A distribution subsystem includes a subsystem that:

  • provides secondary disinfection (i.e. booster chlorination – meaning to add chlorine to treated water received from another subsystem, because there was no chlorine residual evident); or
  • includes transmission or trunk mains and storage (e.g., reservoirs, standpipes, and elevated tanks.)

A water treatment subsystem is a municipal residential subsystem that collects, produces or treats water, but does not include that part of the drinking water system that is a distribution or distribution and supply subsystem.

A treatment subsystem includes any system that provides fluoridation, filtration, or any other treatment. A treatment system includes all systems deemed to be GUDI as described under section 2 of O. Reg. 170/03.

Figure 1: Separate Water Treatment and Water Distribution Systems

Black and white simple image showing water treatement to distribution system

Figure 2: Water Distribution and Supply System (Disinfection Only)

Black and white simple image from the distribution to the supply system

2.2.2 Limited Systems

Limited systems are systems that, compared to large municipal systems, have limited operational requirements. The following system categories are defined as limited systems under O. Reg. 128 /04:

  • small municipal residential – groundwater only
  • large non-municipal residential system
  • large non-municipal non-residential system serving a designated facility
  • large municipal non-residential system serving a designated facility

For each of these system categories there are two types of subsystems:

  • limited surface water subsystem
  • limited groundwater subsystem

A limited surface water subsystem is a system where the raw water supply is or is deemed to be surface water. It would include a system deemed to be under the direct influence of surface water, otherwise referred to as a GUDI system as described under section 2 of O. Reg. 170/03.

A limited groundwater subsystem is a system where the raw water is groundwater. It does not include a system deemed to be a GUDI system.

System classification

3.1 Overview

Only municipal residential systems are classified, since they cover a range of different subsystem types and sizes. A system’s classification is determined by its size, population served and operating complexity; the larger and more complex a system, the higher the class.

Limited systems are not classified as they have only one level for surface and groundwater. Owners determine whether or not they own a limited system based on the categories and definitions provided in O. Reg. 128/04 and O. Reg. 170/03 respectively.

Systems are required to be operated by persons holding a valid operator’s certificate of the same type as the type of subsystem. For municipal residential systems at least one operator must hold a certificate of the same class or higher than the class of the subsystem; for example, a Class IV subsystem must be operated by at least one Class IV operator.

3.1.1 Classification of municipal residential systems

The owner of a municipal residential subsystem must file an application with the Director to have the type and classification of their subsystem determined. Subsystems are classified by assigning classification points for subsystem characteristics in the tables found in Schedules 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 of O. Reg. 128/04.

Municipal systems will receive a classification reflecting the type of subsystem and a class, for example Water Treatment Subsystem Class II.

The owner must ensure that the certificate of classification is conspicuously displayed at the subsystem or, if this is not practical (e.g. at some distribution systems), the certificate should be displayed at the premises from which the subsystem is managed.

3.1.2 Reclassification of municipal subsystems

If the subsystem is altered or no longer meets the criteria under which it was originally classified, the owner must apply to have the classification re-determined.

Generally, if a subsystem is undergoing an upgrade or expansion and an amendment to their drinking water works permit under the SDWA (subsection 32 (2) of the SDWA footnote 1 ) is required, it is recommended that the owner consult with the Program Administrator to determine if reclassification is required.

Further, the Director may request that a subsystem have their classification re-determined if the classification points in Schedules 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3 of the regulation have been amended, or the Director is of the opinion that the subsystem or group of subsystems no longer meets their original classification.

3.1.3 Systems that do not fall under provincial jurisdiction

Drinking water systems that do not fall under provincial jurisdiction do not require classification of their systems (e.g. federal facilities and First Nations systems). To enable participation in the operator certification program, these systems must be assessed by the ministry to determine what type and class the system would be considered under O. Reg. 128/04. Once assessed, operators who work in these systems can be certified, and the experience gained working in these systems will be evaluated for certificate upgrades and renewals.

The system owner can request an assessment by submitting a complete facility classification form to the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office. Once the system is assessed, a certificate of classification will be issued and may be displayed at the system.

In addition, the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office may assess limited subsystems, if an operator wishes to apply experience from that subsystem towards a Class I certificate.

Operator and water quality analyst responsibilities

Operators and Water Quality Analysts play a key role in safeguarding drinking water across the province. All certified drinking water operators and water quality analysts are expected to act and behave with a view to ensuring the safety of public health and for the protection of the environment.

O. Reg. 128/04 states that operators and water quality analysts shall “exercise the level of care, diligence and skill in respect of a drinking water system that a reasonably prudent operator [or water quality analyst] would be expected to exercise in a similar situation” and, “to act honestly, competently and with integrity, with a view to ensuring the protection and safety of the users of a drinking water system.” The ministry is authorized to take disciplinary action if an operator or water quality analyst has failed to meet the above, in order to protect public health and the environment and to maintain the integrity of the operator certification program.

Certification of operators

5.1 Overview

Section 12 (1) of the SDWA requires that only persons holding a valid operator’s certificate can operate a municipal system or a regulated non-municipal system.

Operating functions are those functions typically performed by an operator as described in the definition of 'operator' below.

This includes, for example, a maintenance worker, a laboratory technician, or other employee who is 'on call' and is expected to perform operating functions when 'called out' to do so.

5.1.1 Functions that must be performed by a certified operator

An operator is defined by the functions they perform, not by their job title, union affiliation, or whether or not they are in a supervisory or management position.

An operator means a person who conducts operational checks of or who adjusts, tests, or evaluates a process that controls the effectiveness or efficiency of a subsystem and includes a person who adjusts or directs the flow, pressure or quality of water within the subsystem, if that person works in a distribution subsystem or a distribution and supply subsystem.

O. Reg. 170/03, Schedules 1, 2, 6, 7 and 8 provide that the following must be done by a certified operator for system categories that require a certified operator (please refer to O. Reg. 170/03 for specific requirements):

  • take appropriate action in response to a disinfection equipment alarm;
  • make adjustments to the water treatment equipment;
  • examine test results of continuous monitoring equipment within 72 hours;
  • conduct tests for maintenance and operational checks; and
  • comply with:
    1. the required maintenance schedule or, where this is not available, the manufacturer’s instructions regarding checking or maintaining water treatment equipment
    2. if (a) is not applicable, in the case of a system providing chlorination or chloramination, at least weekly check to confirm proper functioning. For other systems, water treatment equipment is to be checked at least every three months to confirm proper functioning.

Further, under the Drinking Water Testing Services regulation, O. Reg. 248/03, an operator is considered a qualified person for the purpose of conducting water tests footnote 2 and can test for the operational parameters listed under O. Reg. 248/03 (e.g., testing for chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, pH, etc.) Any other water test (analysis) prescribed by O. Reg. 170/03 must be done by a person or laboratory holding a 'drinking water testing services' licence issued by the ministry.

A person must be certified as an operator in order to perform the following functions (also referred to as operating functions):

  • control flow or pressure of drinking water in drinking water subsystems
  • disinfect or treat water using chemicals and/or through making adjustments to treatment equipment
  • monitor gauges, meters and control valves related to disinfection, treatment or distribution of drinking water
  • conduct water tests for the 24 operational parameters listed under O. Reg. 248/03 (e.g. testing for chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, pH, etc.)
  • start and stop pumps, engines and generators to control and adjust flow and treatment
  • open and close valves and gates, whether done manually or by remote control (a non-certified person can open and close valves for the purpose of exercising a valve)
  • add chlorine or other chemicals to the 'distribution' or 'distribution and supply' subsystem
  • perform wet-taps
  • flush hydrants
  • isolate watermains and reconnect isolated watermains
  • maintain logs (e.g., shift logs) or other forms of record-keeping related to treatment and distribution activities in the subsystem, make entries into such logs/records including meter and gauge readings

A person does not need to be certified to perform the following functions:

  • repair previously isolated watermains
  • install or do maintenance on a service meter or perform work on a service line that is covered under the Building Code
  • close a watermain valve as a result of an emergency (i.e. watermain break) if approved by a certified operator (if not an emergency, this must be done by a certified operator)
  • operate (close/open/adjust) a curb stop at or near the property line which controls the flow of water to a service
  • take water for firefighting purposes
  • perform dry taps
  • open or close hydrants for non-operational purposes such as the taking of water by the municipality footnote 3 . (The expectation is that a certified operator with responsibility for the system has been consulted prior to such taking of water).
  • flow and pressure testing

Note: this is not a complete list. Other tasks that impact quality of drinking water may also require an operator’s certificate to undertake. For additional information, please contact the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office.

A person or contractor, not certified as a drinking water operator, can perform functions normally required to be done by a certified operator provided they are being directly supervised by a certified operator, who is physically present and monitoring the work being performed. The certified operator is responsible for all operational work.

5.1.2 Types of operator certificates

Operator certificates correspond to the types of subsystems.

Type of Subsystem Classes of Certificates
Water Treatment
  • Operator-in-Training
  • Class I
  • Class II
  • Class III
  • Class IV
Water Distribution and Supply
  • Operator-in-Training*
  • Class I
  • Class II
  • Class III
  • Class IV
Water Distribution
  • Class I
  • Class II
  • Class III
  • Class IV
Limited System
  • Limited Surface Water
  • Limited Groundwater

* One Operator-in-Training Certificate is issued for both Water Distribution and Water Distribution and Supply and allows the operator to work in both types of subsystems.

For Class I to IV certificates, a person may only hold a distribution or a distribution and supply certificate. A person may not hold both types of certificate at the same time.

5.2 Certificate Qualifications - Operators-In-Training

An operator-in-training (OIT) certificate allows new operators to gain one year of experience required in order to become a Class I operator.

To qualify for an OIT certificate a person must:

  • successfully complete Grade 12 or equivalent (see ministry Guideline 3.1 Grade 12 Equivalency for a list of the educational qualifications or training considered equivalent);
  • pass an OIT or Class I exam;

For more information on the requirements to obtain, renew or restart an OIT certificate please review ministry Guideline 2.4 Drinking Water Operator in Training Requirements.

5.3 Certificate qualifications – limited system & Class I to IV municipal

To qualify for a Class I to IV operator’s certificate, a person must:

  • meet education and training requirements;
  • meet experience requirements; and
  • pass a certification examination.

The higher the level of certificate, the more education and experience required. The experience must be gained in the type of municipal residential subsystem corresponding to the certificate for which the individual is applying. For example, if the applicant is applying for a treatment certificate, the person must have experience in a treatment subsystem. (See Note 6 to the Table below for exceptions.)

Operating experience footnote 4 is experience performing the functions described in section 5.1.1 of this guide. Operating experience means hands-on operating and/or onsite charge of the subsystem. On site charge will only apply to individuals who have operational responsibility for a subsystem, make routine operational decisions and provide detailed and specific operational instructions to other operators. This experience is typically obtained while directly supervising operators.

The certificate qualifications for each type and class of certificate are summarized in the following table (also see Notes to the Table immediately following the table).

Certificate Education/ Training (See Notes 1, 3 & 4) Experience (See Notes 2,5,6 & 7) Exam Other (See Note 10)
OIT Grade 12 or equivalent. N/A OIT or Class I (See note 11) N/A
Class I Grade 12 or equivalent. Must have completed Entry Level Course 1 year of valid operator experience while holding an OIT Class I exam Experience must be 'operating' experience — see definition above (See notes 12 and 13)
Class II Grade 12 or equivalent. Total of 3 years
(See note 8)
Class II exam Must hold a Class I certificate (or deemed to hold) for that type of municipal residential subsystem (See note 12)
Class III Grade 12 or equivalent + 2 years of additional education or training the Director considers relevant Total of 4 years, of which 2 years must be as an OIC in a Class II, III or IV system Class III exam Must hold a Class II certificate for that type of municipal residential subsystem (See note 13)
Class IV Grade 12 or equivalent + 4 years of additional education or training the Director considers relevant Total of 4 years, of which 2 years must be as an OIC in a Class III or IV system Class IV exam Must hold a Class III certificate for that type of municipal residential subsystem (See note 13)
Limited Surface Grade 12 or equivalent. Complete Operation of Small Drinking Water Systems Course N/A Limited Surface Subsystem exam N/A
Limited Ground-water Grade 12 or equivalent. Complete Operation of Small Drinking Water Systems Course N/A Limited Ground-water Subsystem exam N/A

Notes to Table:

Generally, an operator who works in a subsystem that does not require the operator to be at the subsystem full-time but does require the operator to be available full-time will receive one year experience credit for each year employed. However, an operator working part-time in a system requiring full-time operators will receive credit for the actual time worked

  1. A general description of Grade 12 equivalency is provided below. For a detailed description, please refer to the ministry’s Guideline 3.1 Grade 12 Equivalency.

    The following is considered equivalent to having secured Grade 12:

    • a Canadian postsecondary diploma or degree
    • securing the General Educational Development (GED) certificate
    • a 2-3 year diploma or 3-4 year degree from a recognized/accredited university or community college from Canada or the United States
    • a secondary school graduation diploma or GED from other Canadian provinces and territories (CEGEP from Quebec) and the United States
    • a certificate of apprenticeship from Ontario or other Canadian jurisdictions
    • education from other countries may also be considered as equivalent to Grade 12. Review Guideline 3.1 for more information or contact the Program Administrator (see section 13 for contact information.)
  2. Only experience gained while certified to do the work will be considered.
  3. For the purpose of calculating education or training obtained through continuing education, 450 hours of education or training equals one year. This translates into 45 Continuing Education Units (CEU), since 1 CEU equals 10 hours of training.
  4. Substitute experience for education/training:
    1. Class III applicants may substitute up to one year experience as an operator-in-charge (OIC) in a Class II, III or IV subsystem, above that required to meet the experience qualifications, for one year of education/training (or 450 hours of additional education/training.
    2. Class IV applicants may substitute up to two years of experience as an OIC in a Class III or IV subsystem, above that required to meet the experience qualifications, for the two years of additional education/training.
  5. Substitute education/training for experience: Class II, III and IV applicants can substitute education and training (except for elementary and secondary education), above that required to meet the additional education and training qualifications for up to 50% of the required operating experience.
    Eligible substitutions include:

    • relevant postsecondary education such as community college, trade school, university
    • training that meets the 'continuing education' training criteria for purpose of certificate renewal
  6. Substitute different experience: Class II, III and IV applicants may be permitted to substitute the following for certificate qualifying experience:

    1. experience as an operator in a different type of system
    2. experience in a system other than as an operator
    3. other relevant qualifications
  7. The Director needs to be satisfied that such experience or qualifications are relevant to the certificate being applied for.

    Examples of different experience that may be considered are:

    The ratio is often 2:1 or 3:1. For example, three years of water distribution experience would be equivalent to one year of water treatment experience if applying for a higher water treatment certificate.

    See ministry Guideline 3.4 Experience ‘as a Drinking Water Operator’ for more detail on substitutions

    • experience gained working in a wastewater plant
    • experience gained working in a laboratory conducting tests on drinking water or wastewater
    • experience gained within a drinking water system doing electrical or mechanical maintenance, or work as a technical expert or trades person
  8. Application of part-time experience: the application of part-time experience is defined in ministry Guideline 3.4 Experience ‘as a Drinking Water Operator’, and the crediting of operating experience for contractors is detailed in ministry Guideline 5.3 Crediting Experience for Contractors.
  9. The years of experience indicated in this table are not cumulative. For example, a Class I operator is required to obtain one year of experience. The Class II operator requires a total of three years of experience, which includes the one year required to obtain the Class I certificate.
  10. An operator may upgrade their certificate only one class higher than the certificate they currently hold, and can only hold a certificate one class higher than the highest class of subsystem for which they are employed.
  11. An operator may write a Class I exam instead of an OIT exam to meet the exam qualification for an OIT certificate. For example, if a person writes and passes a Class I Water Treatment exam, provided they meet the other qualifications, they can apply for and received a Water Treatment OIT certificate.
  12. An operator who holds a Class I Water Treatment certificate is deemed to hold a Class I Water Distribution and Water Distribution and Supply certificate.
  13. If an operator wants to switch between a Water Distribution and Water Distribution and Supply certificate of the same class, the individual must have a valid Water Distribution and Supply exam result.

5.3.1 Entry level training course

To obtain a Class I certificate, an operator must complete the Entry Level Course. This comprehensive two-week course is available through the Walkerton Clean Water Centre. The course is delivered in two modules: a one-week correspondence module; and a one-week classroom module. See section 13 for contact information.

Students may also complete the Entry Level Course as part of environmental programs of certain community colleges. For a list of the Ontario college diploma programs that have incorporated the Entry Level Course, please visit www.wcwc.ca/en/training/entry-level. For any questions, contact the college directly or the Program Administrator.

5.3.2 Transferability of operator certificates

An operator who holds one type of certificate may be deemed to hold other certificates for the purpose of being able to work in that subsystem.

Certificate Held by Operator Certificate Operator Deemed to Also Hold
Class I to IV Water Treatment
  • Class I Distribution
  • Class I Distribution and Supply
  • Limited Surface Water
  • Limited Groundwater
Class I to IV Distribution and Supply
  • Distribution certificate of the same class
  • Limited Groundwater
Limited Surface Water
  • Limited Groundwater
Class I to IV Distribution Not transferable
Limited Groundwater Not transferable
OITs Not transferable

Note: The operator does not receive a certificate of the type they are deemed to hold.

5.3.3 Operator-in-training – specified operations

A person who holds an operator-in-training certificate may operate both municipal residential systems and limited systems.

The following table shows the subsystems that may be operated by an OIT:
Certificate Held by Operator Subsystems that may be Operated
Water Treatment Operator-in-Training
  • Class I – IV Water Treatment
  • Limited Surface Water
  • Limited Groundwater
Water Distribution/Distribution and Supply Operator in Training
  • Class I – IV Water Distribution and Supply
  • Class I – IV Water Distribution
  • Limited Groundwater

An operator who holds an OIT certificate may operate a limited subsystem only if they are under the supervision of an overall responsible operator and operator-in-charge who holds or is deemed to hold a limited subsystem certificate for that type of limited subsystem.

5.3.4 Conditional operator certificate

The Director may issue a conditional operator certificate for operators holding any type and class of municipal residential subsystem certificate (except for an operator-in-training certificate) and for operators holding a limited subsystem certificate.

The Director may issue a conditional certificate if:

  • the applicant’s employer or potential employer (owner or operating authority) satisfies the Director that they cannot obtain the services of an operator of the type and class required under this regulation (e.g. if an owner of a Class III water treatment subsystem is unable to find an operator holding a Class III water treatment certificate);
  • the owner or operating authority gives both the applicant and the Director a written commitment to help the applicant comply with all the conditions imposed on the certificate; and
  • the required fee is paid.

A conditional operator’s certificate is valid only for the subsystem for which it has been issued. The operator cannot use it to work in another facility. The Director may impose certain conditions on the certificate. The certificate expires three years after it is issued, or on an earlier date specified on the certificate, but may be renewed by the Director, if the renewal requirements are met. See section 5.4 of this guide, Certificate Renewal, below.

Examples of when a conditional certificate might be issued by the Director are as follows:

  • a system upgrade or expansion changes the classification level of the system, and no operator employed in the system has a certificate at the new classification level of the system
  • systems are unable to hire a person with the required class of certificate

Conditions that may be placed on a conditional certificate include, but are not limited to:

  • the operator meeting specific training requirements in addition to the annual training requirements
  • technical support or operational back-up be available to the operator holding the conditional certificate

5.3.5 Operator certificate to be displayed

The owner or operating authority must clearly display the certificate of every operator they employ at the operator’s workplace, or if this is not practical, such as for a distribution system, at the premises from which the subsystem is managed.

5.3.6 Reciprocity

Reciprocity refers to the process whereby certifying authorities may issue a certificate/licence without re-evaluating applicant’s qualifications from another jurisdiction. Under the Agreement on Internal Trade and Ontario Labour Mobility Act, the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks recognizes certificates/licences from other Canadian provinces or territories that have certification programs equal to that of the Province of Ontario. Through reciprocity, operators from each Canadian province and territory can obtain an equivalent certificate/licence in another Canadian province or territory. Ontario will also consider reciprocity for operators from the United States, provided the standards of the state meet those of Ontario.

The Ministry still requires the completion of the Entry Level Course for the issuance of a Class I drinking water certificate for those individuals who are applying from a Canadian province or territory which does not have an equivalent entry level program. Contact the Program Administrator for more details.

5.4 Certificate renewal

5.4.1 Overview

Renewal of an operator certificate is the responsibility of the holder of the certificate. An expired certificate is not a valid certificate. Contravening section 12 of the SDWA – i.e. working as an operator without holding a valid operator certificate – is an offence under the act. It is important that operators notify the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office of a change in address and renew their certificate before it expires.

Generally the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office issues a renewal notice to an operator ninety (90) days prior to the date when their certificate expires. Operators who apply for renewal, meet the renewal qualifications and pay the required fee will receive a new certificate containing the new expiry date.

5.4.2 Renewing an operator certificate

Operator certificates expire every three years. To qualify for renewal, the operator must have:

  1. completed the training requirements in section 29 of O. Reg. 128/04 – see Annual Training Requirements, section 5.4.3; footnote 5
  2. at least three months of operational or related experience in the previous 36 months; and
  3. paid the required fee

In general, related experience includes a role in the drinking water and wastewater industry that enables a person to remain knowledgeable and current on drinking water treatment or distribution equipment and methods.

For example, an operator who becomes a wastewater supervisor, trainer or technical expert could meet the experience requirement during the time that they are actively engaged in such role.

Other related experience could include experience as an electrical/mechanical or maintenance employee of the drinking water system or as a laboratory technician or scientist who tests water.

See ministry Guideline 3.4 Experience as a Drinking Water Operator  for more details on related experience.

For a conditional operator’s certificate to be renewed, the applicant must also have met the conditions of the conditional certificate.

5.4.3 Training requirements

Certificate renewal is conditional on meeting the training requirements for operators described in section 29 of O. Reg. 128/04.

The owner or operating authority must take reasonable steps to ensure that every operator employed in their subsystem completes the required hours of training each year over the three years between certificate renewals.

5.4.4 Type of training

The annual hours of training required under O. Reg. 128/04 are a minimum. The hours consist of three components:

  1. Director-approved continuing education training (typically classroom type courses and workshops with a set curriculum and evaluation);
  2. completion of the Mandatory Renewal Course which counts towards seven hours of the Director-approved continuing education requirement; and
  3. on-the-job practical training (provided in the workplace and may include equipment demonstrations, health and safety within the subsystem, etc.)

The continuing education training must be Director-approved based on the following criteria provided in O. Reg. 128/04:

  • have documented learning objectives
  • be planned and provided by a qualified training provider
  • include a means to verify that the participants have learned the material covered
  • cover subject matter that is directly related to the duties typically performed by an operator

The criteria for on-the-job practical training must meet specific criteria in O. Reg. 128/04:

  • have documented learning objectives
  • be provided by a trainer with expertise in the subject matter
  • cover subject matter directly related to the duties typically performed by an operator

The Mandatory Renewal Course is offered through the Walkerton Clean Water Centre. This one-day course is available in a correspondence and classroom format across Ontario. Completion of this course is mandatory for all operators at least once every three years.

The full details of what constitutes Director-approved continuing education training, as well as the full criteria for on-the-job practical training, are available in the Guide to Drinking Water Operator Training Requirements in O. Reg. 128/04.

5.4.5 Annual training requirements

Operators must complete the annual training requirements listed in Table 4 in order to be eligible for a certificate renewal. The following rules apply for completing the training requirements:

The hours required are based on the highest class of subsystem an operator works in.

  • Operators not employed in a subsystem on the day their certificate expires, but who wish to renew their certificate, must complete the hours of training for the highest type and class of subsystem for which they are certified.
  • Operators holding both distribution and treatment certificates do not need to complete double the amount of hours. Hours of training will be accepted for both distribution and treatment.
  • The training may be completed during any period during the three year period an operator holds a certificate. For example, an operator in a Class II subsystem must complete 35 hours of training per year. The operator may take 105 hours the first year of the certificate and 0 hours in years two and three. The average for the three years meets the required 35 hour minimum.
  • An operator may use continuing education hours above what is required to meet on-the-job practical training requirements, without limit. An operator cannot use on-the-job practical training hours to meet the continuing education requirements.
  • Only courses approved by the ministry and posted on the ministry’s Director Approved Course Listing found on the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office’s website (www.owwco.ca) may be used to meet the Director approved continuing education requirement.
  • The same course may only be used one in any three year certificate renewal period.
  • Part-time operators must take the full number of hours since all operators, whether they work full-time or part-time, need the same level of skills and knowledge to protect the safety of drinking water.
  • An operator may use conferences to meet up to 25% of the Director approved continuing education requirement, provided the conference is on the Director Approved Course Listing. Excess conference attendance may be used to meet the on-the-job practical training requirement.
Annual Training Requirements
System Class Continuing Education On-the-Job Practical Total
Limited System Ground 7 hours 13 hours 20 hours
Limited System Surface 7 hours 13 hours 20 hours
Class I 7 hours 23 hours 30 hours
Class II 12 hours 23 hours 35 hours
Class III 14 hours 26 hours 40 hours
Class IV 14 hours 36 hours 50 hours
Water Quality Analyst 7 hours 13 hours 20 hours

The owner or operating authority must keep records for five years of all the on-the-job practical training completed by operators in their employ. Such record should include the:

  • name of the operator
  • date of the training
  • method used for training
  • name of instructor(s)
  • duration of each training session taken by such operator
  • subject(s) covered

Operators must keep records of continuing education training in order to be able to submit such record to the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office along with the application for certificate renewal.

5.5 Reissuance of an operator certificate after it expires

If the renewal application is made within one year of the expiry date, the applicant must:

  • meet the normal certificate renewal requirements; and
  • pay a late renewal fee in addition to the normal renewal fee.

If the renewal application is made more than one year after the expiry date, the applicant must:

  • meet the qualifications for that type of class of certificate (including passing the certification exam);
  • complete the Mandatory Renewal Course referred to section 5.4.4 of this guide; and
  • pay a late renewal fee in addition to the regular renewal fee.

5.6 Replacement of certificates

The Director will issue a replacement certificate if:

  • the certificate is lost or destroyed; or
  • the name of the operator changes and the original certificate is returned to the Director; and
  • the required fee is paid.

5.7 Refusal to issue or renew an operator’s certificate

The Director may refuse to issue or renew an operator’s certificate if:

  • any of the circumstances under which the Director can revoke or suspend a certificate apply;
  • the applicant is the holder of any other water operator’s licence or certificate or water quality analyst’s certificate that has been revoked or suspended, or that the Director is authorized to revoke or suspend;
  • the certificate to be renewed was revoked or suspended; or
  • the applicant is a holder of a wastewater operator’s licence under O. Reg. 129/04 that was revoked or suspended, or that the Director is authorized to revoke or suspend.

5.8 Revocation or suspension of an operator’s certificate

The Director may revoke or suspend an operator’s certificate, including an operator-in-training’s certificate, for reasons described in subsection 13 (1) of O. Reg. 128/04. The Director may issue a certificate of another type and class than the certificate suspended or revoked, providing the applicant meets the necessary qualifications.

The Director may revoke or suspend a certificate if:

  • the application was fraudulent or contained inaccurate information;
  • the person was discharged from employment in a drinking water subsystem for gross negligence or for incompetence, unless the person has not yet exhausted the rights of appeal available under a collective agreement footnote 6 ;
  • the person has worked as an operator for any length of time without being certified for that type or class of operator he or she worked as or has lied about holding a type or class of certificate that they do not hold;
  • the person has previously had an operator’s certificate or a water quality analyst’s certificate revoked or suspended, and the Director has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is not competent to be an operator;
  • the person previously had an operator’s licence or a wastewater operator’s licence issued under O. Reg.435/93 and O. Reg. 129/04 revoked or suspended, and the Director has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is not competent to be an operator;
  • the person has failed to perform the duties of an operator-in-charge as described in section 26 of O. Reg.128/04, or has failed to keep records as described in section 27 of O. Reg. 128/04, which has resulted in:
    • the discharge of a pollutant into the natural environment;
    • an adverse effect on the health or safety of an individual; or
    • an adverse effect on a process in the subsystem or the system of which the subsystem is a part;
  • the person has failed to:
    • exercise the level of care, diligence and skill that a reasonably prudent operator would be expected to exercise in a similar situation; or
    • act honestly, competently and with integrity, with a view to ensuring the protection and safety of the users of the system; or
  • the person has failed to meet or has contravened any condition that is set out in his or her certificate.

5.9 Appeals

Any certificate decision made by the Director may be appealed to the Environmental Review Tribunal. Details on appeal rights are included in any letter issued by the Director that denies, suspends or revokes a certificate.

Water quality analyst certification and certificate renewal

6.1 Overview

Any water testing (analysis) prescribed by O. Reg. 170/03 must be done by a person or laboratory holding a drinking water testing services licence issued by the ministry. The exception is conducting a test for the 24 operational parameters listed under subsection 2(1) of the Drinking Water Testing Services regulation, O. Reg. 248/03, (e.g., testing for chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, pH, etc.) which can be done by a qualified person. A qualified person includes a certified drinking water operator, including an operator-in-training, and a water quality analyst. footnote 7

A water quality analyst means a person who holds a water quality analyst’s certificate issued under section 16 or 16.1 of O. Reg. 128/04 or who holds a conditional water quality analyst’s certificate issued under section 17 of O. Reg. 128/04.

6.2 Certification of water quality analysts

The Director will issue a water quality analyst (WQA) certificate provided the applicant meets all the qualifications which are as follows:

  • successfully complete Grade 12 or equivalent; or
  • pass the WQA exam; or
  • have one year of experience working in a drinking water system performing tests on water, working in a facility that provides related experience or have experience considered equivalent by the Director; or
  • complete Director approved training related to the testing of water; and
  • pay the required fee.

6.2.1 Water quality analyst certificate to be displayed

The owner or operating authority must ensure that a copy of the WQA's certificate is clearly displayed at the WQA's workplace, or if that is impractical, at the premises from which the workplace is managed.

6.2.2 Conditional water quality analyst certificate

An individual may apply for a conditional WQA certificate. The Director may issue a conditional WQA certificate if:

  • the owner or operating authority that employs or has offered to employ the WQA satisfies the Director that they cannot readily obtain the services of a certified water quality analyst;
  • the owner or operating authority gives both the applicant and the Director a written commitment that they will assist the applicant to comply with any conditions imposed on the certificate; and
  • the required fee is paid.

A conditional WQA certificate is valid only for the subsystem for which it has been issued.

A conditional certificate expires three years after it is issued, or on an earlier date specified on the certificate, but may be renewed by the Director if the renewal requirements are met.

6.2.3 Renewing a water quality analyst certificate

WQA certificates expire every three years. To qualify for renewal, the WQA must have:

  1. completed the training requirements set out in section 31 of O. Reg. 128/04 (See Training Requirements in section 5.4 of this guide);
  2. at least three months experience in the previous 36 months of working as a water quality analyst in a subsystem or related experience; and
  3. paid the required fee.

For a conditional WQA certificate to be renewed, the applicant must also have met the conditions set out in the conditional certificate.

6.3 Reissuance of a water quality analyst certificate after it expires

If the renewal application is made within one year of the expiry date, the applicant must:

  • meet the normal certificate renewal requirements; and
  • pay a late renewal fee in addition to the normal renewal fee.

If the renewal application is made more than one year after the expiry date, the applicant must:

  • meet the qualifications for a WQA certificate, including passing the certification exam;
  • complete the Mandatory Renewal Course described in section 5.4.4 of this guide; and
  • pay a late renewal fee in addition to the renewal fee.

6.4 Replacing a water quality analyst certificate

The Director will issue a replacement certificate if the:

  • certificate is lost or destroyed; or
  • name of the water quality analyst changes and the original certificate is returned to the Director; and
  • required fee is paid.

6.5 Refusal to issue/renew a water quality analyst certificate

The Director may refuse to issue or renew a water quality analyst’s certificate if:

  • any of the circumstances under which the Director can revoke or suspend a certificate under apply;
  • the applicant is the holder of any other certificate that has been revoked or suspended or that the Director is authorized to revoke or suspend;
  • the applicant is a holder of a wastewater operator’s licence under O. Reg. 129/04 that was suspended or that the Director is authorized to revoke or suspend; or
  • the certificate to be renewed is revoked or suspended under section 19.

6.6 Revocation/suspension of a water quality analyst certificate

The Director may revoke or suspend a WQA's certificate for the reasons described in section 19 of O. Reg. 128/04.

The Director may revoke or suspend a certificate if:

  • the application was fraudulent or contained inaccurate information;
  • the person was discharged from employment in a drinking water subsystem for gross negligence or for incompetence, unless the person has not yet exhausted the rights of appeal available under a collective agreement;8
  • the person has worked as a WQA for any length of time without being certified or has lied about being certified;
  • the person has previously had a WQA's certificate revoked or suspended, and the Director has reasonable grounds to believe that the person is not competent to perform their duties;
  • the person has failed to:
    • exercise the level of care, diligence and skill that a reasonably prudent operator would be expected to exercise in a similar situation; or
    • act honestly, competently and with integrity, with a view to ensuring the protection and safety of the users of the system; or
  • the person has failed to meet or has contravened any condition that is set out in his or her certificate.

6.7 Water quality analyst training requirements

See section 5.4 for more details on training requirements.

Certification examinations

7.1 Exam application

In addition to meeting the experience and education requirements specific to the different operator certificates, the applicant must also pass a certification exam in order to receive a certificate.

Applicants may only write examinations one class higher than the class of certificate that they hold. Applicants must wait a minimum of 90 days from the date of writing to take the next class level exam or to rewrite an exam after a failure.

7.2 Locations

A list of the exam dates and locations can be found on the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office’s website (see Section 13 of this guide for contact information).

7.3 Confirmation letter and Code of Conduct

When a person has been registered to write an examination, the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office will send them an examination confirmation letter and the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks' Water and Wastewater Operator Certification and Examination Code of Conduct (Code of Conduct).

The confirmation letter confirms the person’s registration in the examination session, provides the examination details, and must be presented prior to writing the exam.
The Code of Conduct:

  • is a precondition to writing a ministry certification examination;
  • outlines examples of unethical behaviour during the exam and application process; and
  • provides examples of possible consequences for an operator if he or she were to behave dishonestly.

Absolutely no electronic devices, including cell phones, with the exception of non-programmable calculators, may be brought into the exam session. If a person is found to possess any unauthorized materials or equipment during a certification exam, their exam will be forfeited and other disciplinary actions may be taken against them.

7.4 Exam results validity

If an operator writes an examination for a certificate they have not yet acquired, the examination mark is valid for five years from the day of completion. For example, if a Class III operator writes his or her Class IV examination, but is not eligible for a Class IV certificate, that exam mark is valid for a five year period. For more information on this policy, review ministry Guideline 3.11 Exam Results Validity.

Operating standards for subsystems

The owner or operating authority of a subsystem must ensure that every operator employed in that subsystem holds a certificate applicable to that type of subsystem, or a conditional certificate applicable to that particular subsystem.

8.1 Overall responsible operator

The owner or operating authority. footnote 8 must designate an overall responsible operator (ORO) to ensure that a knowledgeable, experienced staff person is available at all times to provide advice to all operators working within the subsystem and to respond immediately and effectively to emergencies.

An overall responsible operator means an operator designated as overall responsible operator of a subsystem under section 23 of O. Reg. 128/04

The owner or operating authority of each municipal residential subsystem must designate as ORO, an operator who holds a certificate for that type of subsystem and that is of the same class as or higher than the class of that subsystem. For example, the ORO of a Class III water treatment subsystem must hold a Class III or Class IV water treatment subsystem operator’s certificate.

The owner or operating authority of each limited subsystem must designate as ORO, an operator who holds a limited subsystem operator’s certificate for that type of subsystem. This would include certificates that are deemed to be limited subsystem certificates (see section 5.3.2 of this guide, Transferability of operator certificates).

To designate means to appoint an operator as holding the position of ORO. It must be clear to other operators working in the subsystem and to the ministry inspector who the ORO is for each shift. The expectation is that the ORO would be identified either by a timely recording the ORO's name in the daily log, through a memo that is posted, etc.

The intent of the regulation is that there be an ORO designated for a subsystem at all times. In order to achieve this goal, an owner or operating authority can designate one operator to be the ORO for particular shifts or days and another operator as the ORO for the other shifts or days, provided there is only one ORO designated at any given time. The operator designated as the ORO must hold a certificate for that type of subsystem which is the same class or higher than that subsystem and must be fully aware that they are the ORO assigned at that time.

The ORO may have responsibility for more than one subsystem provided it does not affect their ability to perform their responsibilities.

The ORO may be off-site; however, he or she must be able to respond immediately and effectively as required.

Licensed engineering practitioners without a drinking water operator’s certificate cannot be designated as ORO.

If a designated ORO holding the proper qualifications is absent or unable to act, the owner or operating authority, or, if the owner or operating authority authorizes it, the ORO, may designate an operator who holds a certificate applicable to that type of subsystem and no more than one class lower to act on their behalf. For example, if the ORO for a Class IV distribution subsystem is absent, an operator holding a Class III distribution subsystem certificate can act in their place.

Owners/operating authorities of municipal residential systems can only rely on "backup" overall responsible operators for up to 150 days in any 12-month period in a municipal residential subsystem. The Director can make an exception if the Director is satisfied that the owner or operating authority cannot reasonably hire an operator holding a class of certificate as high or higher than the class of subsystem. The Director must also be satisfied that extending the time period will not result in a drinking water hazard or a significant risk to the natural environment.

The duties of an ORO cannot be delegated to an operator-in-training.

8.2 Operator-in-charge

The owner or operating authority of each subsystem must designate one or more operators-in-charge (OIC).

An operator-in-charge means an operator or licensed engineering practitioner who is designated as an operator-in-charge of a subsystem under section 25 of O. Reg. 128/04.

An OIC can be any operator, but cannot be an operator-in-training.

The owner or operating authority can also designate a licensed engineering practitioner, who does not have an operator’s certificate, as an OIC. However, the owner can only rely on a licensed engineering practitioner or series of licensed engineering practitioners to be an OIC for up to 180 days in any 24-month period.

The owner or operating authority must ensure that records are maintained of the amount of time each operator works as an OIC.

8.2.1 Duties of an operator-in-charge

An OIC is authorized to:

  • set operational parameters for the subsystem or for a process that controls the effectiveness or efficiency of the subsystem; and
  • direct or instruct other operators in the subsystem to set such operational parameters.

The operator-in-charge shall:

  • take all steps reasonably necessary to operate the processes within his or her responsibility in a safe and efficient manner, in accordance with the relevant operations manuals;
  • ensure that the processes within his or her responsibility are measured, monitored, sampled and tested in a manner that permits them to be adjusted when necessary;
  • ensure that records are maintained of all adjustments made to the processes within his or her responsibility; and
  • ensure that all equipment used in the processes within his or her responsibility is properly monitored, inspected and evaluated and that records of equipment operating status are prepared and available at the end of every operating shift.

OICs and watermain breaks

Upon completion of the excavation, the OIC shall conduct a visual inspection to determine the nature of the break. The OIC will assess the evidence of contamination or potential contamination of the watermain before and during the repair procedure, and shall classify the break as a Category 1 or Category 2 as per the Watermain Disinfection Procedure .

For more information on the roles and responsibilities of the ORO and OIC, please review ministry Guideline 5.1 Overall Responsible Operator vs Operator-in-Charge.

8.3 Strikes and lockouts

During a strike or a lockout involving operators employed in a subsystem, the Director may direct that the subsystem be allowed to operate without the presence of an ORO or certified operator for that type of subsystem. However, the Director must be satisfied the system can be operated without risk to human health or the natural environment.

To assist the Director in making such a determination, the owner or operating authority must submit a strike plan containing specific information. Details on the information required can be secured from the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office.

Information on how to prepare for a strike or lock-out can be found in ministry Guideline 5.2 Obtaining Director’s Direction to Use Non-Certified Operators in the Event of a Strike or Lock-out.

8.4 Recordkeeping regarding the operation of the subsystem

The owner or operating authority must ensure that logs or other forms of record-keeping are available to record information about the operation of the subsystem.

Entries into such records must be made chronologically. Entries can only be made by the ORO, the OIC or by a person authorized to do so by the owner, operating authority, ORO or the OIC. The person who makes the entry must be clearly identified on the record.

The OIC or another authorized person must record the following information on each operating shift:

  • date, time of day the shift began and ended, and number or designation of the shift;
  • names of all operators on duty during the shift;
  • any departures from normal operating procedures that occurred during the shift and time they occurred;
  • any special instructions that were given during the shift to depart from normal operating procedures and the person who gave the instructions;
  • any unusual or abnormal conditions that were observed in the subsystem during the shift, any action that was taken and any conclusions that were drawn from the observations; and
  • any equipment that was taken out of service or ceased to operate during the shift and any action taken to maintain or repair equipment during the shift.

The owner or operating authority must ensure that all records are accessible at the subsystem for at least five years after the last entry (in the case of a book type record keeping method) or for at least five years after each entry (in the case of a loose-leaf or electronic record keeping method). Copies or summaries of the records must be given to the Director when requested.

8.5 Operation and maintenance manuals

The owner or operating authority of a subsystem shall ensure that operators and maintenance personnel in the subsystem have ready access to the comprehensive operations and maintenance manuals that contain plans, drawings and process descriptions sufficient for the safe and efficient operation of the subsystem.

Owner/operating authority responsibilities

Owners and operating authorities have been assigned specific responsibilities under O. Reg. 128/04.

Responsibilities of owners and operating authorities include:

  • file an application for subsystem classification
  • ensure the certificate of subsystem classification is displayed in the workplace
  • ensure that a copy of the certificate of every certified operator and water quality analyst in their employ is conspicuously displayed at the workplace of the operator or the water quality analyst, of if this is not practical, then at the premises from which the workplace is managed.
  • designate an overall responsible operator
  • designate one or more operators as operators-in-charge
  • ensure that records are maintained of the amount of time each operator works as an operator-in-charge
  • ensure that logs or other record-keeping mechanisms are provided to record information concerning the operation of the subsystem
  • ensure that logs and other record-keeping methods are accessible in the subsystem for:
    • at least five years after last entry was made if a book type record
    • at least five years after each entry was made if a loose-leaf or electronic record is kept on a continuous basis
  • ensure that operators and maintenance personnel have ready access to comprehensive operations and maintenance manuals that contain plans, drawings, and process descriptions sufficient for the safe and efficient operation of the subsystem
  • take reasonable steps to ensure that every operator and water quality analyst in the employ complete the required annual number of hours of training
  • retain training records for on-the-job training for operators and water quality analysts in their employ for at least five years

Application forms

When applying for exams or certificates, all documentation, fees and forms are fully completed.

Please keep a copy of all forms submitted. Application forms, supporting documents and fees are to be forwarded to the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office.

Information on program fees is available on the ministry’s drinking water landing page (www.ontario.ca/drinkingwater) and the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office’s website.

Preparing for certification — study guides

The Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office has a number of study materials and aids to help operators prepare for exams. For a list of current study materials and for recommendations on other materials, please visit the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office’s website. See section 13 of this guide for contact information.

Water Wastewater Operator Certification System (WWOCS)

Operators and WQAs have the ability to gain access to key information to help track their certificates/licences in the Water Wastewater Operator Certification System (WWOCS). The system allows operators to view their own personal certification information, including certificates/licences and expiry dates, the Director approved courses that have successfully completed and their past exam results.

To get access to WWOCS, an operator must obtain a user ID and password from Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office. The application for to request a user ID can be found on the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office’s website. The system can be accessed via the internet at the following web address: www.lrcsde.lrc.gov.on.ca/wwocs_web/.

For more information on the system, or to obtain a user guide, please contact the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office.

How to obtain more information

For more information, copies of ministry guidelines, Need-To-Know guides, forms, copies of O. Reg. 128/04 or to order study manuals, please contact the Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office:

Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office (OWWCO)
295 The West Mall
Suite 302
Etobicoke, ON M9C 4Z4

Telephone: 416-231-2100
Toll Free: 1-877-231-2122
Fax: 416-231-2107
Email: info@owwco.ca
Website: Ontario Water Wastewater Certification Office

For more information on the required Drinking Water Operators courses, Entry Level course and Mandatory Renewal Course, please contact the Walkerton Clean Water Centre:

Walkerton Clean Water Centre
P.O. Box 160,
20 Ontario Rd.,
Walkerton, ON N0G 2V0

Telephone: 519-881-2003
Toll Free: 1-866-515-0550
Fax: 519-881-4947
Email: inquiry@wcwc.ca
Website: Walkerton Clean Water Centre