Statement of Conservation Interest

May 31, 2001

Approval statement

We are pleased to approve this Statement of Conservation Interest for the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve.

The Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is 8,656 hectares in size and lies within ecological site district 5E-11 in Southeastern Ontario. It is one of 378 new protected areas approved through Ontario’s Living Legacy, a land use strategy aimed in part, at completing Ontario’s system of parks and protected areas. This conservation reserve provides provincially significant representation of rock barren landscape life science values and regionally significant representation of earth science values.

During the preparation of Ontario’s Living Legacy, the public was widely consulted and provided valuable input into what became the Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy. Public comments during that time and during the September to October 2000 consultation on refining the proposed boundaries of this site, were supportive of the protection of this area.

This Statement of Conservation Interest will provide guidance for the management of the conservation reserve and provide the basis for the ongoing monitoring of activities. More detailed direction is not anticipated at this time.

Peter Waring
A/District Manager
Peterborough District

George Ross
Regional Director
Southcentral Region

1.0 Introduction

The Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is located in southeastern Ontario in Lennox & Addington and Frontenac Counties. This site is found south of Highway #7 and the Hamlet of Kaladar, adjacent to Highway #41. It covers an area of approximately 8,656 hectares and has been recognized since 1993 for having provincially significant life science values. These values were acknowledged again in 1999, as the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve was among the many protected areas that were created under Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy.

Conservation Reserves are established by regulation under the Public Lands Act . Statements of Conservation Interest are prepared in accordance with Procedural Guideline A – Resource Management Planning (PL Procedure 3.03.05).

The purpose of this SCI is to identify the various values present in the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve, including those that have been derived from the geology, ecology and recreational potential of the area. The SCI also outlines the activities that occur within the proposed reserve and provides guidelines for the management of current and future activities, in order to protect these values.

In addition to the 8,656 hectares of Crown land that have been regulated as part of this conservation reserve, there are two parcels of Crown land (158 ha and 325 ha respectively) adjacent to the western and central portions of the conservation reserve that have been designated as Forest Reserves in the Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy. These Crown land parcels are subject to Mining Act land tenure that pre-dated the Ontario’s Living Legacy decision to protect these areas as conservation reserve lands. Consistent with the Land Use Strategy, should the rights to the mining lands be returned to the Crown, these lands will be added to the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve by Public Lands Act regulation.

Figure 1: The Regional Setting of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve

This map shows a detailed information about The Regional Setting of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve.

Enlarge Figure 1: The Regional Setting of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve

Figure 2: The Boundary of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve

This map shows a detailed information about The Boundary of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve.

Enlarge Figure 2: The Boundary of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve

1.1 Background information

Name Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve
Site Region / Site District Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Forest / 5E-11
OMNR Administrative Region / District / Area Southcentral Region / Peterborough District / Kingston Area
Total Area (ha) Regulation Date 8656
April 21 , 2001 by Ontario Regulation 86/01

1.2 Representation targets

Earth Science Representation: Located in the Mazinaw Terrane of the Central Metasedimentary Belt. The dominant rock type is the tonalite of the Mellon Lake Complex, although quartz patches and felsic, coarse grained to pegmatite dikes and segregations are also abundant.

Life Science Representation: A total 92 wetland and terrestrial communities were recorded within the original ANSI and these associations were grouped in the following categories:

  1. Aquatic Vegetation Types
    • Lakes and Ponds
  2. Wetland Vegetation Types
    • Meadow Marsh
    • Tall Emergent Marsh
    • Floating Shrub - Rich Poor Fen
    • Open Shrub Bog
    • Coniferous Treed Bog
    • Thicket or Shrub Swamp
    • Deciduous Treed Swamp
    • Mixed Treed Swamp
    • Coniferous Treed Swamp
  3. Terrestrial Upland Vegetation
    • Open Rock Barren
    • Treed Rock Barren or Woodland Deciduous Treed Rock Barren
    • Wet Mesic - Mesic, Deciduous Forest on Shallow Soils Over Rock
    • Wet Mesic – Mesic Deciduous Forest on Shallow – Moderately Deep, Coarse Sandy Soils
    • Dry Mesic, Mixed Forest on Shallow Soils Over Rock
    • Mesic – Dry Mesic Coniferous Forest
    • Mesic – Wet Mesic, Coniferous Forest
  4. Semi -Natural Vegetation
  5. Anthropogenic Vegetation

Cultural Resources Representation: Minimal research has been conducted to date and there are no registered archeological sites located within the conservation reserve.

Recreational Opportunities: The conservation reserve supports both consumptive and non-consumptive uses. Current and potential activities include hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, ATV use, and canoeing.

1.3 Inventories

Survey Level Earth Science Life Science Cultural Recreational Other
Reconnaissance Duba & Frey, 2000. Site Checksheet White, 1993. Site district ANSI report None District Staff, 2000. Site Checksheet None
Detailed None ANSI site survey and evaluation in preparation None None None
Potential Future Studies Detailed Inventory Inventory of areas not covered by ANSI report Reconnaissance Survey Impact Study None

2.0 Values to be protected

2.1 Earth science

The Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is located within the Central Metasedimentary Belt of the Proterozoic Grenville Province. The Central Metasedimentary Belt has been further subdivided into five lithotechtonic terranes and the site is situated in the Mazinaw Terrane, which is characterized by a linear, northeast-trending, accumulation of supracrustral rocks that have been invaded by compositionally diverse plutons of various ages. The dominant rock type of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is the tonalite of the Mellon Lake Complex, although younger, foliation-parallel and foliation-oblique, narrow, felsic, coarse grained to pegmatite dikes and segregations are also common, as are coarse, locally folded, milky quartz patches (Duba & Frey, 2000).

The earth science features of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve indicate that it contributes to the conservation of the Grenville continental accretion theme, as outlined by Davidson (1981). Furthermore, the site is considered to be of regional significance in its representation of the plutonic rocks of the Mellon Lake Complex of the Mazinaw Terrane (Duba & Frey, 2000).

2.2 Life science

The Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is located within ecological site district 5E-11 and is within Chapman and Putnam’s (1984) bare rock ridges and shallow till landform unit. The life science values of the conservation reserve, which were assessed using the five standard criteria (representation, condition, diversity, ecological considerations, and special features), were found to be provincially significant. The findings of the Mellon Lake Life Science Checksheet (Barry, 2001a) are summarized below.

Representation:

The Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is considered to offer important representation of the vegetative communities found in the rugged 'ridge and valley' topography and in areas of past glacial scouring. As a result, a mosaic of rock barrens, dry-mesic mixed forest, and numerous small lakes and beaver controlled wetlands characterizes the site.

Conditions:

The condition of the site is considered to be fair, due to the impact of fire and logging on some vegetation communities within the last 50 years. There are also a number of adjacent cottages and the conservation reserve is fragmented by Highway 41, a major hydro transmission line and a number of all terrain vehicle (ATV) and snowmobile trails.

Diversity:

The community diversity of the site has been described as high since a total of 92 individual communities in 15 different categories have been identified in the site. Within these communities, there are 678 vascular plants and 597 of which are native species. There are also 84 species of breeding birds, 19 mammal species and 19 reptiles and amphibian species (Brownell, 1994).

Ecological considerations :

The conservation reserve has excellent linkage to several other protected areas including the Kaladar Jack Pine Barrens Conservation Reserve to the west. The Sheffield Conservation Area also provides a linkage between the southwest portion of the conservation reserve and the rest of the site. The site is also quite large, roughly rectangular, and contains headwaters, although it has limited buffering capabilities.

Special features :

A large number of species have been recorded in or adjacent to the site, with some of them being of regional or provincial significance.

Type of Species Species Richness Rare Species
Flora 678 species (16 Provincially Rare) Cooper’s Milk-vetch
Bulbostylis
Bicknell’s Sedge
Button-bush Dodder
Rough Barnyard Grass
Secund Rush
Little Prickly Pear Cactus
Redtop Panic Grass
Pale Green Orchid
Carey’s Smartweed
Snail-seed Pondweed
Scrub Oak
Virginia Meadow-beauty
Winged Sumac
Sharp-leaved Goldenrod
Marsh St. John’s-wort
Fauna Birds (1 Provincially Rare) Prairie Warbler
Fauna Mammals (0 Provincially Rare)  

3.0 Management guidelines

The management guidelines for the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve have been developed in accordance to the policies and permitted uses described in the Conservation Reserves Policy and Procedure 3.03.05 and the Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy. The current permitted uses in conservation reserves are summarized in Appendix A (Procedural Guideline B – Land Uses – Test of Compatibility).

3.1 Land tenure

Background:

The Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is comprised entirely of Crown Land. During the development of the reserve’s boundaries, it was noted that some blocks of private land were surrounded by the conservation reserve. These private lands are not part of the conservation reserve. Unopened road allowances and shoreline road allowances within and adjacent to the conservation reserve are owned by the local municipalities and are also not part of the conservation reserve.

Five private recreation camps are located on Crown lands within the boundaries of the conservation reserve. All five of the recreation camps operating on crown land are authorized through Land Use Permits.

Guidelines:

Sale of Crown lands within the reserve shall not be considered. Should adjacent private lands become available for acquisition, the purchase of lands will need to be examined in the context of future planning.

In order to consolidate the reserve boundaries and to facilitate more effective resource management, the Ministry of Natural Resources would be interested in entering into discussions with the townships to close all unopened road allowances and transfer them to the Crown for inclusion within the conservation reserve, if this matter was acceptable to the municipality.

Existing private recreation camps will be allowed to continue, undergo periodic maintenance, and may be eligible for enhanced tenure, but not purchase of the land. Requests for the transfer or enhancement of existing tenure documents will be addressed through a screening process that should include the Land Use Test of Compatibility (Appendix B).

3.2 Existing/proposed development

Background:

Portions of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve lie adjacent to both Highway #7 and Highway #41, which pass through the reserve in two places. A number of smaller roads also briefly cross through the site. In addition, a major utility line completely bisects the site.

Other development within the site includes a major ATV trail that run north south through the middle of the conservation reserve. At this time, there are no other confirmed trails, although their existence is highly probable.

Guidelines:

No new roads will be permitted within the conservation reserve. Existing roads through the conservation reserve are permitted to continue. The periodic maintenance of existing roads shall be permitted.

Existing transmission lines will also be allowed to continue, although all new energy and communication corridors will be discouraged, unless it can be demonstrated that there are no other alternatives. All other proposals for new development within the reserve (e.g. road upgrades, new trails, etc..) must meet the guidelines of Procedural Guideline B – Land Use Test of Compatibility (PL 3.03.05).

3.3 Recreational activities

Background:

Existing recreational activities within the conservation reserve include hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, ATV use, and canoeing. There are also a fair number of cottages on adjacent patented lands that bring a significant number of recreational users to the area. However, access to the site is somewhat limited and, as a result, the recreational utilization of the conservation reserve will remain low. The most suitable access point to the Mellon Lake area is through the Sheffield Conservation Area, which already has a parking lot and boat launch.

Guidelines:

The current range of recreational uses will be allowed to continue, provided that they do not have a negative impact on the values for which the conservation reserve was selected for protection. However, off-trail ATV and snowmobile use will be restricted to the retrieval of game.

3.4 Commercial activities

Background:

Commercial activity is limited to fur harvesting, with eight licensed traplines operating within the boundaries of the conservation reserve. While some bait fishing has been known to occur on Mellon Lake, there are no licensed operations at this time.

Guidelines:

Fur harvesting will be allowed to continue, unless there are significant demonstrated conflicts between these activities and the values for which the conservation reserve was protected. New operations can be considered and will be subject to the Land Uses Test of Compatibility (Appendix B).

During the evaluation of requests for new fur harvesting licenses, the associated trails that would be required also need to be considered. Requests for transfers will be dealt with on an on-going basis.

Conservation reserves do not permit commercial forestry, hydro development, the extraction of aggregate and peat or other industrial uses (Public Lands Act, Ontario Regulation 805/94). Other new commercial activities must meet the requirements of the Land Uses Test of Compatibility (Appendix A).

The Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy provides that controlled mineral exploration is permitted in specific new conservation reserves that have been identified as having provincially significant mineral potential. This mineral resource assessment has not yet been undertake and it is uncertain what is the mineral potential of the Mellon Lake area. If mineral values are such that a site is to be developed for a mine, that area would be deregulated from the conservation reserve and an appropriate replacement area would be added.

3.5 Aboriginal Interests

Background:

This site does not fall within the area of the Algonquin land claim; however it is close to the general area the local Sharbot Mishigama Anishabae assert as being their traditional use area. The site also lies within the Interim Traditional Area (as defined in 1994 by the Ministry of Natural Resources) of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte.

Guidelines:

In the creation of this conservation reserve, it is not intended that any existing Aboriginal or Treaty rights, as recognized by section 35 of the Constitution Act , 1982, will be abrogated or derogated.

3.6 Natural Resource Stewardship

3.6.1 General

Background:

To date, natural resource stewardship has been virtually non-existent. However, in order to sustain the health of the ecosystem and the current level of use, some of the conservation reserve’s representative natural values may require active management.

Guidelines:

The conservation reserve will be managed by allowing natural ecosystems and processes to function and the emphasis will be on ensuring that the natural values of the reserve are protected.

3.6.2 Vegetation

Background:

Some vegetation community associations, including the large regional significant rock barrens for which the reserve was protected, may require prescribed burns to regenerate them. Although it is not known whether or not such activities were ever practiced within the boundaries of the conservation reserve, prescribed burns have been implemented in the Kaladar area in the past for the purpose of blueberry production (Brownell, 1997).

Guidelines:

Although the landscape will be allowed to function naturally, some vegetation communities may need to be examined to determine whether or not fire needs to be introduced into the ecosystem. Such management will be established within the context of the current forest fire management program and more detailed resource management planning for this area.

3.6.3 Wildlife

Background:

The conservation reserve is located in Wildlife Management Unit 62, where controlled deer hunting is permitted, as well as open seasons for moose, black bear, and a variety of small game and waterfowl. Eight licensed traplines are active within the conservation reserve.

All of the major lakes in the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve have been classified as warm water and are known to support populations of walleye, bass and northern pike. Fisheries management within the site is minimal and there is no known history of fish stocking within the boundaries of the conservation reserve.

Guidelines:

Hunting and fishing within the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve will be guided by the relevant Ontario hunting and fishing regulations. Fur harvesting will be managed through the maintenance of the current licensing system.

The status of the fish populations within the conservation reserve should continue to be monitored and future stocking may be considered in order to ensure that the native fish populations are maintained and that angling opportunities are provided for.

3.7 Cultural Resource Stewardship

Background:

Cultural values in the reserve have not yet been identified, as archeological research in the vicinity of the site has been minimal. As a result, there are no registered archeological sites with the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve, although there are ten sites in the general vicinity.

However, the Ministry of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation advises that the site should be considered to have many localities that are of moderate to very high potential for the presence of significant archeological, or other cultural heritage sites.

Guidelines:

Interested parties will be encouraged to conduct inventories and studies of the area, consistent with Procedural Guideline C – Research Activities in Conservation Reserves (Appendix B). In light of the Ministry of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation’s information on cultural resource potential, any proposed development should be preceded by a cultural heritage resource assessment. Specific recommendations for the stewardship of cultural resources will depend on the results of such investigations.

3.8 Client services

Background:

Client services, such as interpretation and signage, have been non-existent to date due to the lack of direct access to the conservation reserve.

Guidelines:

Given the lack of access to the site, client services within the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve will be extremely limited and will focus on self-interpretation. There is currently no intention to develop any public access points, although signage could be placed strategically along the perimeter if future planning warrants such an endeavor. The need for public access may also need to be examined in the future.

3.9 Research

Background:

Research in the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve has focused on the completion of inventories of that area’s natural heritage values. Such research stems from the fact that the site was considered to be a candidate Area of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI) by White in 1993.

Guidelines:

The ministry will encourage further research and documentation of the values that were identified in the representation targets (Section 1.2). Research will be conducted consistent with Procedural Guideline C – Research Activities in Conservation Reserves. Research emphasis will be placed on the information that was found to be lacking in SCI Section 1.3.

3.10 Marketing

Background:

To date, there has been very little promotion of the area.

Guidelines:

Given the lack of access to the site, extensive marketing of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve is not warranted. However, a map and basic information about the conservation reserve will be prepared and made available to interested parties. All other marketing of the area should focus on the area’s unique contribution to Ontario’s Living Legacy.

4.0 Implementation

Administrative responsibility for this Conservation Reserve lies with the Ministry’s Kingston Area Office of the Peterborough District. Although the Area Office will take a lead role in addressing the management needs of the reserve, partnerships with local interest groups may also be established, where appropriate.

The short term goals for the implementation of this SCI shall be to:

  • Prepare a basic map and information package (fact sheet) about the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve
  • Encourage further inventory and research activities to enhance information about the reserve
  • Explore the possibility of entering into discussions with the municipality to stop up and close of all unopened road allowances within the reserve and transfer these to the Crown
  • Conduct additional studies to evaluate the need for public access, other client services, and marketing of the area; and
  • Seek to protect conservation reserve natural heritage and recreational values from adverse impacts of activities from adjacent lands, including possible mining or aggregate extraction activities on the adjacent Crown lands designated as Forest Reserves

5.0 Review and revision

This Statement of Conservation Interest for the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve will be subject to review and revision on an ongoing basis.

Two particular issues may result in an amendment to this SCI.

  • That parcel of Crown land situated west of and adjacent to the existing Kaladar Jack Pine Barrens Conservation Reserve and regulated as part of the Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve, but may be more effectively managed as part of the Kaladar Jack Pine Barrens. If a Ministry assessment concludes this is the case, then the existing Kaladar Jack Pine Barrens SCI and the Mellon Lake SCI would be revised to add these lands to the Kaladar Jack Pine Barrens for administrative purposes only. The existing Public Lands Act regulations for these two conservation reserves would not have to be amended
  • Secondly, as referenced in Section 1.0 of this SCI and consistent with the Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy, should the existing Mining Act tenure on the two Forest Reserve designated parcels of Crown land adjacent to this conservation reserve be returned to the Crown, then these lands will have to be formally regulated as part of this conservation reserve by a Public Lands Act regulation amendment. This SCI would be updated accordingly

If changes are required to this SCI, they will occur through a standard process of minor and major amendments. Minor amendments are uses and activities that do not affect or conflict with any of the policies that are already laid out in the SCI. These changes shall be dealt with in a relatively informal manner and will require the approval of the Area Supervisor.

Uses and/or activities that were not anticipated in the preparation of this SCI and which have the potential to have a negative impact upon the values of this proposed conservation reserve will require a major amendment, This amendment process will require the approval of the District Manager and Regional Director.

References

Andersen, Chris. February 2001. Personal communication. Ontario Ministry of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation, Heritage Operations.

Barry, Janice. 2001a. Natural Heritage Area – Life Science Checksheet: Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Peterborough District.

Barry, Janice. 2001b. Recreation Inventory Report – Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve (C14), Version 1 – February 2001. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Peterborough District.

Brownell, Vivian R. 1997. A Biological Inventory and Evaluation of the Puzzle Lake Area of Natural and Scientific Interest [Draft]. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Brownell, Vivian R. 1994. Preliminary Comparison of Mellon Lake, Puzzle Lake and Kaladar Jack Pine Barrens ANSIs. Unpublished.

Chapman, L.J., and Putnam, D.F. 1984 The Physiography of Southern Ontario , Ontario Geological Survey.

Duba, D. and E.D. Frey. 2000. Earth Science Checksheet – C14 Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve [Draft]. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. 2000b. Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve (C3) Fact Sheet , Peterborough District.

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. 1999. Ontario’s Living Legacy Land Use Strategy.

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources 1997 Conservation Reserve Policy PL 3.03.05, Lands and Natural Heritage Branch.

White, David J. 1993. Life Science areas of natural and scientific interest in Site District 6-10: A review and assessment of significant natural areas. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Tweed District.

Appendix A: Procedural guideline B - Land Uses - Test Of Compatibility

The Conservation Reserve policy provides broad direction with regard to the permitted uses. The policy provides only an indication of the variety of uses that will be considered acceptable in conservation reserves. The only caution is that "any new uses, and commercial activities associated with them, will be considered on a case by case basis, and, they must pass a test of compatibility to be acceptable." What does a 'test of compatibility' mean?

An examination of this must start from the premise of why an area is set aside - specifically, its representative natural heritage values. Criteria are then identified to guide compatibility considerations. These criteria apply to the long term acceptability of both existing uses and new uses.

  1. Conformity to SCI/RMP: SCI describe values for which an area has been set aside and the range of appropriate us es that will be permitted in the area. SCI may also speak to the acceptability of other 'new' uses currently not occurring in the area.

    The first 'test' is: "do proposed new land uses and/or commercial activities conform to the direction of the SCI/RMP for the conservation reserve? Would the new use(s) depart from the spirit of appropriate indicator land uses in the SCI/RMP?"

  2. Impact Assessment: If the proposed use(s) pass test one it is important to determine their impact on the area before they are approved. This should include the following:
    • impact on natural heritage values : "will the new use(s) impact any natural values in the area? If so how and to what degree? Is it tolerable?"
    • impact on cultural values : "will the new use(s) impact any historical or archaeological values in the area?"
    • impact on research activities : "will the new use(s) affect any research activities in the area?"
    • impact on current uses : "will the new use(s) have any negative impact on the array of current uses?" impact on area administration: "will the new use(s) increase administrative costs and/or complexity?" (For example, the cost of area monitoring, security and enforcement).
    • impact of accommodating the use outside the conservation reserve: "Could the use(s) be accommodated as well or better outside the conservation reserve?"
    • impact on socio -economics of the area: "will the new use(s) affect the community(ies) surrounding the area in a positive or negative way?" (For example, will the new use make the area less remote thereby affecting a local tourism industry that is dependent on the area’s remoteness for its appeal)?
    • impact on area accessibility: "does the new use(s) give someone exclusive rights to the area or a portion of the area to the exclusion of other existing uses?"

The following table provides a guide of indicator uses for the consideration of uses that may be permitted within conservation reserves. For any specific conservation reserve the test of compatibility should be applied to determine which specific uses are acceptable.

Appendix B: Indicator uses for Conservation Reserves – generic and specific

(Modifications were made to reflect current OLL policies, as the original chart that is found in the Procedural Guideline B – PL 3.03.05 only applies to pre-OLL conservation reserves)

Industrial activities

Activity Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
Existing
Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
New
Specific application
in Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve
Existing
Specific application
In Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve
Existing
Commercial timber harvest No No No No
Cutting of trees by leaseholders and property owners for fuelwood and small-scale uses Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe
Timber salvage/sunken log retrieval Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe
Mineral exploration Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe
Mining No1 No1 No1 No1
Extraction of peat, soil, aggregate, other materials No No No No
Forest renewal Maybe2 Maybe2 Maybe2 Maybe2
Hydro power generation No No No No
Communications corridors Yes No3 Yes No3
Energy transmission corridors Yes No3 Yes No3
Transportation corridors Yes No3 Yes No3
Resource access roads Maybe3 Maybe3 Maybe3 Maybe3
Private access roads Yes No4 Yes No4

Recreation activities

Activity Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
Existing
Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
New
Specific application
in Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve
Existing
Specific application
In Mellon Lake Conservation Reserve
Existing
Sport fishing Yes Yes Yes Yes
Sport hunting Yes Yes Yes Yes
Facility development Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe
Non-trail snowmobiling Maybe5 Maybe5 Maybe5 Maybe5
Non-trail ATV use Maybe5 Maybe5 Maybe5 Maybe5
Motorized boating Yes Yes Yes Yes
Camping Maybe Maybe Yes Yes

Trails:
- hiking,
- snowmobiling,
- cycling,
- horse riding,
- cross-country skiing

Yes Maybe Yes Maybe
Private recreation camps Y6 No Yes6 No

1 If, as a result of a controlled mineral exploration, a site within a conservation reserve in the OLL planning area is to be developed for a mine, it will be deregulated and appropriate replacement area added to the reserve.

2 If a new conservation reserve has been recently cut, companies have an obligation to proceed with renewal. It can be conducted where it will be of net benefit to the protected area and to, the greatest extent possible, it should be designed to replicate natural conditions.

3 The intent is to actively discourage these uses, but it is recognized that in some circumstances these will be no alternative; this will be determined through planning.

4New private access roads, including additions to existing roads, will not be permitted except where there are previous commitments that were made prior to March 29, 1999. Such commitments will be subject to the completion of a public planning process.

5 Use may be permitted for the direct retrieval of game only.

Commercial activities

Activity Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
Existing
Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
New
Specific application
in Proposed Hungry Lake Conservation Reserve
Specific application
in Proposed Hungry Lake Conservation Reserve
Fishing Yes7 Maybe Yes7 Maybe
Bait-fish harvesting Yes7 Maybe Yes7 Maybe
Commercial fur trapping Yes7 Maybe Yes7 Maybe
Trapping cabin Yes No Yes No
Out-post camps/tourism facilities Maybe8 Maybe8 Maybe8 Maybe8
Commercial bear hunting (tourist operators) Yes No Yes No
Wild rice harvesting Yes7 Maybe Yes7 Maybe
Food harvesting Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe

Resource management activities

Activity Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
Existing
Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
New
Specific application
in Proposed Hungry Lake Conservation Reserve
Specific application
in Proposed Hungry Lake Conservation Reserve
Resource inventorying Yes Yes Yes Yes
Resource monitoring Yes Yes Yes Yes
Fire protection Yes Yes Yes Yes
Insect and disease Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe
Featured Species Management Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe

Other activities

Activity Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
Existing
Generic OLL policy
Permitted?
New
Specific application
in Proposed Hungry Lake Conservation Reserve
Specific application
in Proposed Hungry Lake Conservation Reserve
Research Yes Yes Yes Yes
Collecting Maybe9 Maybe9 Maybe9 Maybe9
Food Gathering Yes Yes Yes Yes
Land disposition Maybe Maybe Maybe Maybe
Habitat Management for Wildlife        
Research Yes Yes Yes Yes
Collecting Maybe9 Maybe9 Maybe9 Maybe9
Food gathering Yes Yes Yes Yes
Land disposition Yes10 Maybe10 Yes10 Maybe10
Habitat Management for Wildlife Maybe1 Maybe1 Maybe Maybe

6. Existing private recreation camps are eligible for enhanced tenure but not for the purchase of lands. A decision to grant enhanced tenure, or to transfer recreational camps will be addressed though a screening process.

7. Existing use permitted to continue, unless there are significant demonstrated conflicts. New operations can be considered, subject to the 'test of compatibility.'

8. Existing authorized tourism facilities can continue unless there are demonstrated conflicts. The operators of tourism facilities can apply to upgrade tenure from LUP to lease. New tourism facilities can be considered during planning for a conservation reserve.

9. Must be part of an authorized research project.

10. Sale of lands is not permitted with the exception of some minor types of dispositions where it does not detrimentally affect the values an area is intended to protect. Renewals of existing leases of land use permits will be allowed for approved activities.

Appendix C: Procedural guideline C – research activities in Conservation Reserves

Purpose

To encourage contributions to the goal of conservation reserves by:

  • providing direction for research activities associated with conservation reserves; and
  • establishing a process for the review and approval of proposals by researchers, which could have an impact on the values protected by the conservation reserve

Definition

Research means any investigation or study of the natural, cultural, social, economic, management or other features or characteristics of conservation reserves.

Guidelines

Research will be encouraged to provide a better understanding of the natural values protected by a conservation reserve and to advance their protection, planning and management. The Statement of Conservation Interest will define, for each conservation reserve, the key research issues, set out the parameters within which research may occur and identify research needs.

Applications and approvals

Researchers must apply in writing to the Area Supervisor for permission to conduct research. The request letter must contain a statement explaining why the proposed research should be undertaken in the particular conservation reserve in preference to another location.

Proposals will be reviewed and approved by the Area Supervisor, guided by the Statement of Conservation Interest prepared for each reserve (see Guideline A – Resource Management Planning) and using Guideline B – Land Uses – Test of Compatibility. Permission must be granted in writing, including any conditions to be met in conducting the research, prior to the undertaking of any research project.

Terms and conditions

Permission to conduct research under this policy will be valid for a period of 12 consecutive months from date of issue. Permission to continue a research project for additional periods of 12 months or less may be granted upon submission of a written request and progress report. The Ministry may require the posting of collateral to assure that the terms and conditions of granting permission are met.

The Area Supervisor may suspend or revoke permission at any time for failure on the part of the researcher to meet:

  1. The intent or conditions of this policy
  2. The requirements under the Public Lands Act, including all amendments, where applicable
  3. The requirements under any other Act or Regulations of Ontario or Canada, including those governing the taking, handling, storing, confining, trapping, excavating and marketing any specimen, artifact, information or action (for example, scientific collector’s permit)
  4. The conditions and agreements specified in granting permission

Final report

The researcher will submit copies of reports, publications and theses following from the results of the project to the Area Supervisor.

Updated: June 28, 2021
Published: November 10, 2015