Overview

The Modifying Industrial Operations Protocol (MIOP) and the Industrial Operations Protocol (IOP) were developed to give direction to industries working within forest areas of Ontario on how to prevent wildfires and how to be prepared to control any fires occurring on or near their industrial worksites.

The protocol applies to industrial operations within the Ontario Fire Region during the fire season, which is April 1 to October 31 each year.

Learn more about the Industrial Operations Protocol (IOP, PDF) for operations governed under the Forest Fires Prevention Act, and Regulation 207/96 (Outdoor Fires) as amended. If you need this information in an alternative format, please contact the Natural Resource Information and Support Centre or call toll-free: 1-800-667-1940 (Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. E.T. except statutory holidays) or via TTY: 1-866-686-6072. Note: We will acknowledge emails and online messages within two business days and answer them within 15 business days.

Learn more about the Modifying Industrial Operations Protocol (MIOP, PDF) for operations governed by a forest management plan approved under the Crown Forest Sustainability Act, 1994.

For more information on the MIOP or the IOP Training (including Fuel Group Decision Keys) and how to access the forest fire suppression training manual (SP 102, 105, and 106), please contact your local Fire Management Headquarters.

How to evaluate the risk of fire

Fire intensity is the key indicator that determines the difficulty of controlling a forest fire.

Industries or municipalities with operations in forested areas rely on fire intensity codes to modify work activities as fire danger increases. During these times, extra precautions may be required, or work may be modified or put on hold until it is safe to continue, to prevent any fires from starting.

View the forest fire danger ratings map and the forest fire activity map.

Here are five steps to determine how and when operations should continue or stop.

1. Check the operational risk/fire risk category

Some industrial operations are more likely to create a source of ignition (e.g., spark from heavy equipment).

2. Check if the forest is in Leaf On/Leaf Off condition

The risk of fire ignition changes with the seasons. The protocol refers to "Leaf Off"/"Leaf On" conditions as the trigger point when these conditions change.

3. Find the fuel group on the worksite

There are five fuel groups used in the protocols. They range from:

  • fuel group 1 – the least flammable/hazardous which consists primarily of deciduous forest types in the "Leaf On" condition, to
  • fuel group 5 – the most flammable/hazardous which consists of conifer forest types that burn easily, including those impacted by insects

4. Check the difficulty of controlling a forest fire

Use the fire intensity codes and weather forecasts on this page to determine the difficulty of controlling a forest fire.

5. Cross reference operational risk/fire risk category to fire intensity code

Operations may be modified or put on hold for all or part of the next day or until the fire intensity code changes.

Contact us

If you have any questions or if you need a hard copy or alternative format of the either protocol, contact your local Fire Management Headquarters.

Northeast region fire intensity codes/weather

Fire intensity codes

Industrial Fire Intensity Codes are targeted to be available by 14:30 Eastern Daylight Time for all stations in the Northeast Fire Region.

Weather observations and forecasts

Available after 14:30 EDT

Cooperators report

Learn about the current fire situation (PDF) in the Northeast region.

Northwest region fire intensity codes/weather

Fire intensity codes

Weather observations and forecasts

Available after 14:30 CDT; 15:30 EDT:

Cooperators report

Learn about the current fire situation (PDF) in the Northwest region.

Updated: May 19, 2021
Published: July 10, 2014