Context

The French Language Services Act

The French Language Services Act (FLSA) provides individuals with certain rights to receive services in French from government agencies, as defined in the FLSA, and institutions of the Legislature. This includes any head or central office of a government agency or institution of the Legislature, as well as any other office designated by regulation and any office of such agency or institution that is located in or serves an area designated under the FLSA.

Designation of public service agencies (Ontario Regulation 398/93)

Organizations that provide a service to the public, are subsidized in whole or in part by public money, and wish to obtain official designation under the FLSA, or to expand their existing designation to cover additional services may seek a designation under the FLSA.

As a designated public service agency, the organization would be subject to the French-language service obligations under the FLSA that apply to government agencies, either in respect of some or all of its services, depending on the designation.

The Ministry of Francophone Affairs

The Ministry of Francophone Affairs (MFA) works with ministries and organizations to ensure that the needs and interests of the Franco-Ontarian community are taken into account in public policies and programs, and to facilitate the participation of the Franco-Ontarian community in government-related initiatives.

As the steward of the FLSA and main advisor of the government on Francophone affairs and French-language services (FLS), the MFA’s mandate includes overseeing the administration of the FLSA.

Purpose

This user guide provides organizations with guidance on how to submit a complete designation request or update, and to better comply with the designation requirements.

Who can apply for a designation

An organization can apply for a designation as a “public service agency” if it:

Submission of the designation request

The organization must submit the completed designation request, including the Human Resources plan and all documents intended to support the application for designation, to the ministry, or ministries, providing funding (“sponsoring ministry”) through the FLS Designation Tool on the Transfer Payment Ontario (TPON) website.

Please contact a sponsoring ministry representative for additional information.

Note for Francophone organizations that operate exclusively in French and serve a solely French-speaking clientele (“by and for” Francophones)

The organization’s policies will automatically pertain to services in French. However, due to the particulars of a designation under the FLSA, Francophone organizations must demonstrate how, for instance, their governance structure, policies and recruitment strategies protect the delivery of quality FLS and address the difficulties often encountered in the delivery of FLS by and for Francophones in a minority setting in Ontario.

All organizations requesting a partial or full designation under the FLSA must meet the same set of requirements established by the Government of Ontario.

Next steps

The process and steps following the submission of a request are outlined below.

The sponsoring ministry:

  1. reviews, analyzes and determines whether the request meets all designation criteria. The ministry may reach out to the organization if more information is required, as needed
  2. recommends to the MFA to proceed with the request if all designation requirements are met
  3. advises the organization of the status of the request

The MFA:

  1. reviews, analyzes and determines whether the request meets all designation criteria
  2. recommends to the Minister for Francophone Affairs to bring forward a regulation amendment to O. Reg. 398/93 (“designation regulation”) made under the FLSA providing for the requested designation, for approval by the Lieutenant Governor in Council (LGIC)

The LGIC:

  1. may make (that is, approve) a regulation designating the organization as a public service agency for the purpose of the definition of “government agency”

Once the designation has been approved, the MFA files the designation regulation with the Registrar of Regulations who, in turn, orders the publication of the regulations on both e-Laws and the Ontario Gazette. A letter is then sent to the organization to congratulate them on their designation.

Evaluation of designated organizations

To ensure designated organizations remain in compliance with the designation requirements, organizations must complete an evaluation every three years, providing updated versions of the Human Resources plan and other supporting documents. Any changes to the offer of FLS must be disclosed and supported by the relevant documents.

Instructions for completing specific sections of the designation request

Organization profile

Upon registration on the FLS Designation Tool, please provide your organization’s legal name and operating name if the two are different.

Designation information

Please make sure to list the official name(s) of program(s)/service(s). The name(s) indicated here will then be used to update O. Reg. 398/93 (Designation of Public Service Agencies) if the designation request is approved.

Community

Refer to this map to identify designated areas, if applicable.

An accessible list of all the designated areas in Ontario, as shown on the map, is also available on the Ministry of Francophone Affairs’ website.

Note: Refer to the Glossary for a detailed list of defined terms.

Human Resources plan

The Human Resources plan must indicate the organization’s capacity at the date of the designation request.

Below is a sample print-out of an HR Plan. To view your HR Plan in the same format, click the Print icon located at the top right of the window.

Table showing a sample human resources plan

Accessible description of HR Plan image

Screen capture of a table titled HR Plan, which lists the following data: program/service; category; position; Function Centre (if applicable); total of full-time and part-time employees; number of full-time and part-time employees required for FLS, proficiency level(s) required; number of bilingual employees with the required level(s) of French language proficiency; variance value; variance explanation (if applicable).

Two positions are listed in the table as examples. The first is a Physician position, under a service titled Primary Care, and a category titled Front-Line, a sample Function centre of 0123456, with a total of 3 part-time employees, all of which having the required Advanced level of French language proficiency.

The second is a HR Manager position, under a service titled Administrative & Support Services, and a category titled Human Resources, a sample Function centre of 0123456, with a total of 1 full-time employee, all of which having the required Advanced- Plus level of French language proficiency.

No variance explanations are necessary for either position, since the required number of positions match the total number of positions and the required proficiency levels are met.

Designation requirements

Note:

  • Mandatory elements indicate how organizations must demonstrate their compliance with the requirements.
  • Best practices are recommendations made to organizations when planning and delivering FLS to optimize the services offered.

Governance

A designation request must include a letter from the chair of the board of directors or governing body confirming the following (see letter template in Appendix IV):

  1. Resolution adopted by the board or governing body to seek a designation.

  • Mandatory elements
    • The resolution must clearly identify the type of designation (full or partial) and the services targeted.
    • Ensure that the resolution is signed and attested to by an individual/individuals authorized to sign on behalf of the organization (for instance, the chair of the board of directors or governing body).
  • Best practice
    • The organization may further strengthen their commitment for FLS by way of a by-law.
  1. Policy framework for FLS to support the current and future offer of FLS.

  • Mandatory element
    • Ensure that the policy framework confirms the existence of a current and future offer of FLS.
  • Best practices

    A FLS policy framework should include, but is not limited to, the following:

    • a commitment to FLS and the Francophone community served
    • the responsibilities and commitment to FLS of third parties with which the organization enters into service delivery agreements, to the extent that these agreements pertain to the delivery of designated services
    • a strategic direction on FLS
    • a clear accountability framework for the delivery of quality FLS, including a survey on the quality of services offered and a complaint process
    • policies and procedures to support the delivery of FLS, including detailed guidelines for the active offer of FLS, such as the organization’s front desk, signage, and verbal and written communications (such as voice messages and email signatures, website, the development and distribution of materials), etc.
    • translation and quality assurance processes
    • a recruitment process for qualified bilingual staff and volunteers; FLS training and orientation for staff in designated bilingual positions (this could also be found in the human resources policy regarding FLS)
  1. Detailed statement describing the responsibilities of the board of directors or governing body and the senior management team with respect to FLS, as agreed on by the board or governing body.

  • Mandatory element
    • Provide a copy of the detailed statement.
  • Best practices

    A detailed statement on responsibilities could highlight the commitment of the board and senior management to:

    • being representative of and serving the community well, including Francophones
    • supporting, tracking and remaining accountable for the quality of FLS delivered
    • ensuring that employees are aware of their FLS obligations and that resources are made available to support the delivery of FLS. It is recommended that all staff, including members of the board of directors or governing body and management, receive training and orientation on FLS legislation, requirements and obligations
    • ensuring that complaints are addressed and resolved in a timely manner
    • reviewing the quality of FLS delivery

    To ensure Francophone representation, organizations could:

    • promote the participation of Francophones on their board of directors or governing body and relevant committees to engage them on subjects pertaining to the Francophone communities served
    • consider having proportional representation of Francophones in the community served on the committees of the board of directors or governing body
    • promote recruitment of board members or members of the governing body within the Francophone community
    • be actively involved with the Francophone community they serve. For example, organizations could:
      • participate in community strategic FLS planning
      • engage with key Francophone stakeholders and members of the community
      • actively promote, support and collaborate with partner organizations to deliver FLS in the community

    The inclusion of Francophone members on the board of directors or governing body is a powerful opportunity to faithfully represent the Francophone clientele within an organization’s governance structure. In addition, Francophone representation can help ensure control and increase accountability for the delivery of FLS.

Direct services to clients

Please provide schedules, a detailed description of how these services are offered in French and copies of relevant documents.

  1. All telephone services, including voice messages and interactive response systems, are actively offered in French.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide copies of voice messages scripts.

    Ensure that:

    • reception lines and general inquiry lines are answered using a bilingual greeting
    • calls to staff in designated positions are answered in both English and French
    • the automated system offers callers an English and French option and information on how to access services in French in both languages
  • Best practices
    • Staff in unilingual positions that may receive calls from the public in French are provided with key sentences in French to redirect French-speaking callers to bilingual staff.
    • If communication with the public occurs virtually (for instance, via Zoom, Skype or Teams), staff should ensure that invitations and other communications with the public contain instructions in French.
  1. FLS are actively offered by the organization at all points of contact. Upon first interaction, clients requesting these services are identified and directed accordingly.

  • Mandatory elements
    • At points of contact, FLS are clearly communicated. For example, clients are directed to the area where designated FLS are visible, available, easily accessible and equivalent to the quality of services in English.
    • Clearly indicate to clients that the organization provides services in French. This can be achieved by answering the phone in both French and English and always offering front desk services in French and English.
    • When the services covered by the designation are provided bilingually, the services in French should be offered on the same schedule as that of the services provided in English, and in a way that responds to the needs of Francophones.
  • Best practice
    • It is recommended to keep linguistic preference on the client’s file to ensure that services are proactively offered in French to them in the future.
  1. Contracts signed with third parties that offer services to clients on behalf of the organization seeking designation contain clause(s) stating their obligations to ensure the quality and active offer of FLS to clients (Only submit documents if you signed contracts with third parties).

  • Mandatory elements
    • If the organization currently has agreements with such third parties, provide a contract template (including relevant clauses/schedules).
    • Agreements with such third parties must include a clause stating the third parties’ obligation to provide designated services in French.
  1. Mechanisms to assess the quality of the delivery of FLS, such as a survey and complaint process, are available in French and are clearly communicated to clients.

  • Mandatory elements

    Provide:

    • copies of both the client satisfaction survey and complaint form in English and French or in a bilingual format
    • a description of the complaint process
    • an explanation of how these mechanisms are communicated to clients (for instance, via email, website, in person, paper form)

    When the complaint is submitted in French, it is important to ensure that any communication with the complainant (from intake to resolution) is in French.

  • Best practice
    • These are helpful mechanisms to receive direct feedback from clients which will help improve the quality of the services provided.

Visual identification and communications

Please provide samples or photographs when applicable.

  1. Information on designated services is clearly posted in French on the organization’s main webpages. Relevant webpages, including those pertaining to designated services, are available in French.

  • Mandatory element
    • Provide hyperlinks of relevant webpages in French in a simple Word document.
  • Best practices

    Relevant webpages are those that include the following information:

    • information on the organization
    • contact information
    • registration information and/or forms
    • career opportunities (when designated bilingual positions are posted)
    • information on events relevant to the Francophone community and online registration (if applicable)
    • feedback forms

    To ensure quality of French when translating webpages, organizations are encouraged:

    • to use professional translation services
    • to carefully review translations
  1. Any exterior signage is available in French. If the name of the organization is in English, the signage must indicate that FLS are available.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide photos of the exterior signage in French.
    • If signage is not available when the designation request is submitted, but arrangements have been made for displaying the signage within a reasonable delay, submit proof and a timeframe within which the signage will be completed.
    • Proof could consist of, for instance, a written commitment of the organization’s board of directors or governing body, or an invoice.
  1. Any interior signage is available in French and bilingual employees are identified. If the organization offers partial FLS, French signage must guide the public to the locations where FLS are offered.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide photos of the interior signage in French.
    • If signage is not available when the designation request is submitted, but arrangements have been made for displaying the signage within a reasonable delay, submit proof and a timeframe within which the signage will be completed.
    • Proof could consist of, for instance, a written commitment of the organization’s board of directors or governing body, or an invoice.
    • In the case of partial designation, organizations must submit pictures of signage guiding the public to the locations where FLS are offered.

    For designated services:

    • The public should be able to easily identify employees in designated bilingual positions.
    • Here are a few examples of how to identify bilingual employees:
      • “Je parle français” tags
      • bilingual voicemail
      • bilingual email signatures
      • bilingual signage (for example on office doors and name plates)
      • bilingual business cards, if applicable (see mandatory elements for Requirement 13)
  1. Admission forms and other documents intended for clients are available in French or in a bilingual format and are actively offered to the French-speaking clientele.

  • Mandatory element
    • Provide samples of forms and documents translated in French.
  • Best practices
    • Admission forms and other documents aimed at French-speaking clients are available and actively offered in French at first point of contact, at the counter, on screen displays and online (if applicable).
    • Admission forms can include consent/referral forms.
  1. Correspondence addressed to the organization in French is responded to in French and the organization’s letterhead is available in French or a bilingual format.

  • Mandatory element
    • Provide sample(s) of the letterhead(s).
  1. Communications and publications intended for the public concerning services covered by the designation (including pamphlets, brochures, public notices and press releases) are simultaneously available in English and French.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide samples of recent communications and publications translated in French.
    • Organization staff are not required to have business cards. However, if employees use them, cards must be bilingual for those in designated positions. If applicable, provide a sample of bilingual business cards.
    • Any advertising must also take into account the service being promoted and the clientele targeted. Advertising related to designated services must be available in French or a bilingual format and circulate in Francophone media outlets if appropriate. If applicable, provide a sample.

    For organizations with a social media presence:

    • Organizations communicating information pertaining to designated services on social media should post to a bilingual account or use two separate accounts (French and English). This includes blogs, Twitter and Facebook pages, etc. The content should be equivalent in both languages. However, it can be adapted to make it more relevant to the Anglophone or Francophone audiences. If applicable, provide a sample.
    • When consulting with the community through public forums, events or consultations, these meetings, along with their accompanying documents, should be offered in a bilingual format or in both French and English. If applicable, provide a sample.
  • Best practices

    Organizations:

    • have a translation process in place and use professional translation services
    • implement a reviewing process for translations
    • make FLS resources (tools and software) available to staff to support quality communication in French

    Communications can be available in a bilingual format (both in English and French) or in two separate documents, one in English and one in French.

Accountability

  1. A senior manager has been identified to assume oversight and accountability for the delivery of FLS.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide a high-level list of responsibilities of the senior manager assigned to the delivery of FLS.
    • Definition of senior manager: Person responsible for the day-to-day tasks of effectively managing the services for which the designation is requested.
  • Best practices

    FLS responsibilities could be:

    • included in the senior manager’s job description
    • part of the senior manager’s annual performance review
    • integrated in the workplan of management overseeing FLS with key objectives and monitoring of deliverables

    The table under Appendix III offers suggestions of a senior manager’s FLS-related responsibilities.

  1. A mechanism is in place to review and address FLS issues and complaints, and a report on FLS accomplishments and issues is submitted at least once a year to the board of directors or governing body.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide an overview of the mechanism in place to review and address feedback received on the delivery of FLS (from the clientele through surveys and complaints processes such as under Requirement 7, or through other channels).
    • Provide an overview of the mechanism in place for reporting on FLS to the board of directors and governing body.
  • Best practices

    Organizations are encouraged to produce an annual report that should:

    • review the status of FLS
    • report on progress
    • highlight FLS best practices

Human resources policy and planning

  1. Ensure that a mechanism is in place to support the permanency and continuance of FLS.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide a copy of the human resources policy in addition to the human resources plan.
    • The human resources policy must address all the items identified in Requirements 16 to 19.
  • Best practice
    • Organizations are encouraged to put a strategy in place to ensure that the uninterrupted offer of FLS is equivalent to English language services.
  1. Put in place strategies to recruit, hire and retain qualified personnel and volunteers with the required level of proficiency in French.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Provide a copy of the human resources policy in addition to the human resources plan.
    • The human resources policy must address all the items identified in Requirements 16 to 19.
  • Best practices

    This is an opportunity for organizations to demonstrate their process for recruiting and hiring personnel with the required level of proficiency in French.

    This process could include:

    • having one bilingual or Francophone staff member on the recruiting panel
    • administering a verbal and/or a written test, etc.

    A table suggesting examples of French language proficiency levels can be found in Appendix II of this guide.

  1. Offer training for employees who do not fully meet the linguistic requirements for their designated position.

  • Mandatory elements
    • Organizations should demonstrate the offer of training by identifying tools, training or strategies used to support their employees.
    • In addition, continuous training is intrinsically valuable and could be used by any staff to improve their language skills.
    • If, despite its best efforts, an organization is unable to fill a designated position with an individual who fully meets the linguistic requirements of the position, and offers the position to a candidate that does not fully meet these requirements, then training must be made available to the employee and completed within a reasonable timeframe. By the end of the training, it is recommended to retest the employee’s linguistic proficiency.
  1. Identify all designated bilingual positions, the required levels of French language proficiency, whether the positions are vacant or filled and whether incumbents meet the proficiency requirements.

  • Mandatory element
    • This requirement is met by completing the Human Resources plan.
  • Best practices

    The human resources policy should accurately account for bilingual recruitment by considering the following:

    • The development of an ongoing process to assess the community’s demand for FLS and the appropriate number of bilingual staff members required to meet the demand and provide services equivalent to services offered in English. This could be achieved by implementing measures to assess:
      • the needs of the Francophone population
      • the volume of requests for service
      • the number of staff members required to provide FLS
      • the required level of staff’s FLS proficiency
    • The internal organization policies and procedures should account for evaluation of designated positions. For example, if a complaint is received and/or analyzed by a member of the management team, a bilingual manager must be available during hours of operation to ensure that there is no delay in the intake or processing of a complaint submitted in French.
    • The development of a strategy for filling designated positions, including plans to advertise vacancies, including in Francophone media, job boards and networks.
    • The use of an accredited language assessment service, if possible.

    A table suggesting French language proficiency levels can be found in Appendix II of this guide

Community support

Only for new designations.

  1. Letters of support for the designation from Francophone individuals or organizations in the region served are included in the designation request.

  • Mandatory element
    • Organizations must provide letters of support.
  • Best practice
    • Individualized letters should come from both service providers or partners in the community and clients who have benefitted from the FLS provided or support the designation.

Appendices

Appendix I: Definition of “government agency” under the French Language Services Act

“government agency” means,

  1. a ministry of the Government of Ontario, except that a psychiatric facility, residential facility or college of applied arts and technology that is administered by a ministry is not included unless it is designated as a public service agency by the regulations,
  2. a board, commission or corporation the majority of whose members or directors are appointed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council,
  3. a non-profit corporation or similar entity that provides a service to the public, is subsidized in whole or in part by public money and is designated as a public service agency by the regulations,
  4. a long-term care home as defined in the Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007 that is designated as a public service agency by the regulations or a home for special care as defined in the Homes for Special Care Act that is designated as a public service agency by the regulations,
  5. a service provider as defined in the Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2017 or a board as defined in the District Social Services Administration Boards Act that is designated as a public service agency by the regulations,

and does not include a municipality, or a local board as defined in the Municipal Affairs Act, other than a local board that is designated under clause (e).

Appendix II: Recommended French language proficiency levels

French Language Proficiency
LevelOral proficiencyWritten proficiency
Advanced-Minus level (1)At this level, the individual has the ability to handle a variety of communication tasks. The individual is able to describe and explain in all timeframes in most informal and some formal situations across a variety of familiar topics. The vocabulary often lacks specificity. Nevertheless, the individual is able to use rephrasing and paraphrasing. Although grammatical, lexical and pronunciation errors are evident, the individual can speak with enough accuracy to be understood.At this level, the individual is able to meet basic work-related writing needs. The individual is able to narrate and describe in major verb forms or tenses and is able to compose simple summaries on familiar topics. The individual is able to combine and link sentences into paragraphs to form full texts. Writing is understood although some additional effort may be required.
Advanced level (2)At this level, the individual has the ability to participate in conversations and satisfy many work requirements. The individual can discuss work-related matters with some ease and facility, expressing opinions and offering views. The individual is able to take part in a variety of verbal exchanges and to participate in meetings and discussion groups. However, the individual still needs help with handling complicated issues or situations. The individual is generally good in either grammar or vocabulary but not in both.At this level, the individual is able to use a variety of sentence types to express general ideas and opinions on non-specialized topics. The individual can write simple letters and reports required by the position. The individual experiences few problems with either grammar or spelling. However, the writing style may represent literal translations. Nevertheless, a sense of organization is emerging, and the individual is beginning to sense what is stylistically and grammatically correct in French.
Advanced-Plus level (3)At this level, the individual is able to give oral presentations in both formal and informal settings. The individual is able to present a fairly detailed outline of his/her line of reasoning on general or work-related topics in formal and informal settings, in meetings and in discussion groups. Some mastery of idioms and of specific vocabulary appropriate to a variety of contexts is evident. Grammar is generally appropriate. Deficiencies in vocabulary are compensated for by synonyms and paraphrases. Problems may be encountered when discussing more specialized topics, but the individual at this level has very little difficulty in making themselves understood.At this level, the individual is able to write about a variety of topics with significant precision and detail. The individual can handle informal and formal correspondence according to appropriate conventions, and write summaries and reports of a factual nature. The individual can also write extensively about topics relating to particular interests and specialized areas of competence, although their writing tends to emphasize the concrete aspects of such topics.
Superior level (4)At this level, the individual has the ability to speak the language with sufficient structural accuracy, fluency and vocabulary to participate effectively in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social and professional topics. The individual is able to use idioms and specific vocabulary relevant to a variety of contexts and to give verbal presentations in both formal and informal settings.At this level, the individual is able to express him/herself effectively and accurately in most formal and informal writing tasks/assignments on practical, social and professional topics. The individual is able to recognize awkwardness in sentence structure and paragraphs. Errors in grammar and spelling are minor and infrequent.

Appendix III: Example of FLS responsibilities for a senior manager

Example of key responsibilities:

  • Put in place resources for service delivery:
    • assessment and assignment of required resources
  • Day-to-day delivery of FLS:
    • monitoring adherence of the FLS policy and HR Plan with the designation requirements
    • identification of service delivery issues
    • development and implementation of solutions to address FLS issues
  • Prepare a report to board of directors or governing body on FLS delivery

Appendix IV: Template letter from the Chair of the board of directors or governing body requesting a designation to the funding ministry or ministries

Date: [insert date]

To: [Ministry Contact]

Subject: Request for [full/partial] designation under the French Language Services Act (FLSA)

Our organization is requesting an official designation under the FLSA and confirms our ability to offer [all/some] public services in French on a continuous basis for [Insert specific name of service(s)/facility(ies)/program(s)]. This letter is an attestation that the organization has complied with the requirements below and has included the required supporting documents.

  1. [Board of directors/governing body] Resolution

The [board of directors/governing body] passed a resolution on [Insert date] affirming the organization’s decision to seek a [full/partial] designation under the FLSA for [Insert specific name of service(s)/facility(ies)/program(s)].

  1. Organization’s Policy Framework

The [board of directors/governing body] has confirmed our organization’s detailed French-language services (FLS) policy framework in support of the current and future offer of FLS.

  1. Allocation of Responsibilities

The [board of directors/governing body] has agreed upon their responsibilities, as well as those of the organization’s senior management team, with respect to the delivery of FLS. Enclosed is a detailed statement with the responsibilities of the respective parties.

If you require further information, please contact [Contact name, Title] at [Contact details: phone number or email address].

Authorized Signature [Chair of the board of directors/governing body]

[Name, title] [Name of organization]

Appendix V: Map of designated areas

There are 26 designated areas in Ontario, as shown on this map (PDF).

An accessible list of all the designated areas in Ontario, as shown on the map, is also available on the Ministry of Francophone Affairs’ website.

Glossary

By and for Francophones

A service or an organization that operates exclusively in French and serves a solely French-speaking clientele.

Designated agency

An organization designated as a public service agency pursuant to the French Language Services Act. Such an organization is required to comply with applicable French language services requirements under the French Language Services Act.

Designated area

An area designated under the French Language Services Act for the provision of government services in French.

Designated bilingual position

A position that requires a specific level of French-language proficiency for oral and/or written skills and plays a key role in the active offer of services in French. Designated bilingual positions are identified within an organization to serve the French-speaking population of the area and ensure service continuity (back-up planning).

Francophone

The Government of Ontario’s Inclusive Definition defines Francophones as those who have French as their mother tongue; those whose mother tongue is neither French nor English but have a particular knowledge of French as an official language; and those who use French at home.

Full designation

Designation under the French Language Services Act of all the services offered by an organization that are funded by the Government of Ontario.

Funding

Funding refers here to financial assistance provided by government to non-government entities. Transfer Payments are a key method for providing funding to non-government entities in Ontario. However, government funding does not include tax credits, deductions, or exemptions.

Partial designation

Designation under the French Language Services Act of some of the services offered by an organization that are funded by the Government of Ontario.